19

This cannot be done in C#. Any way to do it?

...

laugh, in case my little pun wasn't understood, what I mean is: how can I mark a property in C# as NonSerialized? Of course, when the property contains logic, it's natural to be unable to do it, but Auto-Properties are serializable, and, as such, I would expect to have some way to allow me to prevent their serialization.

  • 3
    This is not possible. – SLaks Jan 2 '11 at 0:20
5

Edit * : Auto Implemented Properties are backed by an anonymous field which you don't really have access to, attributes are designed to be controlled by a reflection based mechanism. These fields cannot be referenced by the reflection mechanism (because they are anonymous). This compiler feature would require a lot of changes to the generation of auto-properties... It would also require that the compiler treat auto-properties as fields for the purpose of marking field attributes onto them.

To answer the more fundamental part of the question - your point was that Auto-Properties are serialized and so there should be a way to control their serialization. You're right - but auto properties are meant as a shorthand and were never designed to give you the full flexibility, but rather to allow you to easily extend their functionality the "long" way if you ever needed it.

  • I added the more details answer from my comments to the body of the answer.
  • I am not a C# noob ::- ). I know these things. Even so, the compiler COULD add a special check for auto-properties and allow for a NonSerialized attribute. If they are serialized, they SHOULD be marked for ignore. I know I can do it if I create setter/getters but that's another story and has nothing to do with my question ::- ). – Axonn Apr 6 '11 at 0:02
  • 1
    :) In that case i have a better explanation for you: Auto Implemented Properties are backed by an anonymous field which you don't really have access to, attributes are designed to be controlled by a reflection based mechanism. These fields cannot be referenced by the reflection mechanism (because they are anonymous). Your compiler feature would require a lot of changes to the generation of auto-properties... It would also require that the compiler treat auto-properties as fields for the purpose of marking field attributes onto them. – NightDweller Apr 6 '11 at 21:06
  • I noticed that this still doesn't answer fundamental part of your question - your point was that Auto-Properties are serialized and so there should be a way to control their serialization. You're right - but auto properties are meant as a shorthand and were never designed to give you the full flexibility, but rather to allow you to easily extend their functionality the "long" way if you ever needed it. – NightDweller Apr 6 '11 at 21:16
  • That is correct ::- D. After all, it boils down to me being quirky and wanting some things which would probably be clumsy to achieve. In the end, of course, I took the "long code" route and that's it. Not such a big deal. The answer, after all, is that it can't be done ::- ). – Axonn Apr 10 '11 at 18:25
  • :) that seems to be the case.. – NightDweller Apr 10 '11 at 21:43
8
  [NonSerialized]
  public string MyProperty { get; set; }

Is an error

  [XmlIgnore]
  public string MyProperty { get; set; }

Is not an error

NonSerialized Indicates that a field of a serializable class should not be serialized.

XmlIgnore Instructs the Serialize method of the XmlSerializer not to serialize the public field or public read/write property value

so, if you ask

I would expect to have some way to allow me to prevent their serialization.

the answer yes, if you're using XmlSerializer

  • 1
    Applying XmlIgnoreAttribute to a property causes that property to no longer appear in generated XML documentation. – Craig Boland Oct 12 '15 at 20:13
5

For events, you can use [field:NonSerialized], but for auto-properties this does not work. It seems like it would be a very logical way to handle auto-properties as well, but for some reason it doesn't seem to have been implemented.

1

I theory yes, it's possible. In practical nope, not possible.

Serialization classes only works on private fields. When you define a auto property; at behind the scenes compiler automatically generates a private field for it. That means this is a language feature not a .net framework feature.

Also serialization classes are included in redbits, which is any change prohibited due compatibility except bug fixes.

I hope thats helps.

1

What was said above is right: You can't prevent an auto-implemented property from being serialized by setting an attribute like [NonSerialized]. It just does not work.

But what does work is the [IgnoreDataMember] attribute in case you are working with an WCF [DataContract]. So

[DataContract]
public class MyClass
{
    [DataMember]
    public string ID { get; set; }

    [IgnoreDataMember]
    public string MySecret { get; set; }
}

will get serialized under WCF.

Although since WCF is an opt-in technology, you can also just omit the [IgnoreDataMember] and it will work as well. So maybe my comment is a little academical ;-)

0

You could probably do this with Mono.Cecil, a bytecode manipulation library. Theoretically, you could add custom attributes to the hidden backing field. This is so inconvenient, however, that I don't think it warrants an example.

If you had a large application with your own postprocessor, you might consider creating your own substitute for NonSerializedAttribute that could be applied to properties. The postprocessor could then use Mono.Cecil or similar to apply NonSerializedAttribute to the backing fields. It's quite common for large applications to undergo such postprocessing to save that extra bit of typing.

-4

[NonSerialized] public decimal yourproperty;

(decimal as example.)

Also remember, if you want enable your class to initialize a nonserialized member automatically, use the IDeserializationCallback interface and then implement IDeserializationCallback.OnDeserialization.

  • 5
    He said property. That's a field. – SLaks Nov 15 '10 at 13:24
  • o, yes. I missed. – arena-ru Nov 15 '10 at 13:29

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