5

I am stuck and I can't seem to figure this out. I have a simple class with an interface. I am injecting EFContext and Logger into this service. For some reason, no matter how I register the service it's always a singleton. I put the Guid property on the class to see if it changed on each request, but it stays the same.

Here is the AccountService class and its interface:

public interface IAccountService 
{
    Account GetAccountByEmailAndPassword(string emailAddress, string password);
}

public class AccountService : IAccountService
{
    private readonly IEFContext _context;
    private readonly ILogger<AccountService> _logger;
    private string _guid;

    public AccountService()
    {
        _context = context;
        _logger = logger;
        _guid = Guid.NewGuid().ToString();
    }

    public Account GetAccountByEmailAndPassword(string emailAddress, string password)
    {
        try
        {
            //get the account
            var account = _context.Account.FirstOrDefault(x => x.EmailAddress == emailAddress);

            //make sure we have an account
            if (account == null)
                return null;

            //generate hash from account
            var accountHash = GeneratePasswordSaltHash(account.Password, account.PasswordSalt);

            //generate hash from credentials passed in
            var passedInHash = GeneratePasswordSaltHash(
                Convert.ToBase64String(HashPassword(password)),
                account.PasswordSalt);

            // TODO: number of failed attempts should lock account etc.
            return accountHash == passedInHash ? account : null;
        } catch (Exception ex)
        {
            _logger.LogError("Exception in AccountService: " + ex.ToString());
            throw;
        }
    }
}

Here is how I am registering the services:

public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
{
    // App Settings
    services.Configure<AppSettings>(Configuration.GetSection("AppSettings"));

    // Add DBContext
    var connectionString = Configuration["AppSettings:Data:ConnectionString"];
    services.AddDbContext<EFContext>(options => options.UseSqlServer(connectionString));

    // Add framework services.
    services.AddMvc();

    //  Add DI
    services.AddScoped<IEFContext, EFContext>();
    services.AddScoped<IAccountService, AccountService>();
}

Here is the EFContext class and its interface:

public interface IEFContext
{
    DbSet<Account> Account { get; set; }

    int SaveChanges();
    EntityEntry Update(object entity);
}

public class EFContext : DbContext, IEFContext
{
    public EFContext(DbContextOptions options) : base(options) {}
    public DbSet<Account> Account { get; set; }
}

I can hit the database and all that with the context, but, everything is a singleton. I was first alerted to the issue because if I went into the database and manually updated some data on an Account, then requested the account again in code, the data would come back stale. I thought it was a context issue but I think I'm configuring the context lifecycle correctly by using .AddScoped<>, but I couldn't get it to work. So then I tried adding the _guid property to the AccountService to determine if it was getting newd up on each request and it doesn't appear to be. I have tried .AddTransient<> as well. Any help is appreciated. Thanks so much.

EDIT Here is my configure method:

public void Configure(IApplicationBuilder app, IHostingEnvironment env, ILoggerFactory loggerFactory)
    {
        loggerFactory.AddConsole(Configuration.GetSection("Logging"));

        loggerFactory.AddDebug();
        loggerFactory.AddSerilog();

        //Token stuff
        // secretKey contains a secret passphrase only your server knows
        var secretKey = "mysupersecret_secretkey!123";
        var signingKey = new SymmetricSecurityKey(Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes(secretKey));

        var tokenValidationParameters = new TokenValidationParameters
        {
            // The signing key must match!
            ValidateIssuerSigningKey = true,
            IssuerSigningKey = signingKey,

            // Validate the JWT Issuer (iss) claim
            ValidateIssuer = true,
            ValidIssuer = "ExampleIssuer",

            // Validate the JWT Audience (aud) claim
            ValidateAudience = true,
            ValidAudience = "ExampleAudience",

            // Validate the token expiry
            ValidateLifetime = true,

            // If you want to allow a certain amount of clock drift, set that here:
            ClockSkew = TimeSpan.Zero
        };

        app.UseJwtBearerAuthentication(new JwtBearerOptions
        {
            AutomaticAuthenticate = true,
            AutomaticChallenge = true,
            TokenValidationParameters = tokenValidationParameters
        });

        // Token generator
        var options = new TokenProviderOptions
        {
            Audience = "ExampleAudience",
            Issuer = "ExampleIssuer",
            SigningCredentials = new SigningCredentials(signingKey, SecurityAlgorithms.HmacSha256),
        };

        app.UseMiddleware<TokenProviderMiddleware>(Options.Create(options));

        app.UseMvc();
    }

In my Token middleware, I do have it using the AccountService, here is the token middleware:

public class TokenProviderMiddleware
{
    private readonly RequestDelegate _next;
    private readonly TokenProviderOptions _options;
    private readonly IAccountService _accountService;

    public TokenProviderMiddleware(RequestDelegate next, IOptions<TokenProviderOptions> options, IAccountService accountService)
    {
        _next = next;
        _options = options.Value;
        _accountService = accountService;
    }

    public Task Invoke(HttpContext context)
    {
        // If the request path doesn't match, skip
        if (!context.Request.Path.Equals(_options.Path, StringComparison.Ordinal))
        {
            return _next(context);
        }

        if (!context.Request.Method.Equals("POST")
           || !context.Request.ContentType.Contains("application/json"))
        {
            context.Response.StatusCode = 400;
            return context.Response.WriteAsync("Bad request.");
        }

        return GenerateToken(context);
    }

    private async Task GenerateToken(HttpContext context)
    {
        var rawAccount = await new StreamReader(context.Request.Body).ReadToEndAsync();
        var authAccount = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<AuthAccount>(rawAccount);

        var account = _accountService.GetAccountByEmailAndPassword(authAccount.EmailAddress, authAccount.Password);
        if (account == null)
        {
            context.Response.StatusCode = 400;
            await context.Response.WriteAsync("Invalid email address or password.");
            return;
        }

        var now = DateTime.UtcNow;

        // Specifically add the jti (random nonce), iat (issued timestamp), and sub (subject/user) claims.
        // You can add other claims here, if you want:
        var claims = new Claim[]
        {
            new Claim(JwtRegisteredClaimNames.Sub, account.EmailAddress),
            new Claim(JwtRegisteredClaimNames.Jti, Guid.NewGuid().ToString()),
            new Claim(JwtRegisteredClaimNames.Iat, ((DateTimeOffset)now).ToUnixTimeSeconds().ToString(), ClaimValueTypes.Integer64),
            new Claim(ClaimTypes.Role, account.RoleId.ToString()),
            new Claim(ClaimTypes.Name, account.EmailAddress)
        };

        // Create the JWT and write it to a string
        var jwt = new JwtSecurityToken(
            issuer: _options.Issuer,
            audience: _options.Audience,
            claims: claims,
            notBefore: now,
            expires: now.Add(_options.Expiration),
            signingCredentials: _options.SigningCredentials);
        var encodedJwt = new JwtSecurityTokenHandler().WriteToken(jwt);

        var response = new ApiResponse<AuthAccount>
        {
            StatusCode = (int)HttpStatusCode.OK,
            Message = "Access granted",
            Data = new AuthAccount
            {
                Access_Token = encodedJwt,
                Expires_In = (int)_options.Expiration.TotalSeconds
            }
        };

        // Serialize and return the response
        context.Response.ContentType = "application/json";
        await context.Response.WriteAsync(JsonConvert.SerializeObject(response, new JsonSerializerSettings { Formatting = Formatting.Indented }));
    }
}
6
  • Any "funky" code you are calling in Configure(...) class, like seeding? Post your Configure Method. If you instantiate DbContext inside Configure, this may cause troubles, because you resolve it in a place where you don't have a request and hence, no scope. Scopes are tied to Requests in ASP.NET Core (not really tied but each request creates a new scope) – Tseng Jan 25 '17 at 16:16
  • Also it may be worth to check out this stackoverflow.com/documentation/asp.net-core/1949/… on how to correctly instantiate scoped services inside Configure – Tseng Jan 25 '17 at 16:19
  • @Tseng this post just got rather long, but there it is in all it's glory. – crizzwald Jan 25 '17 at 16:34
  • but to your point, no, nothing funky with context or the account service. just the middleware using those dependencies - which, shouldn't cause an issue? – crizzwald Jan 25 '17 at 16:36
  • Well, the thing is: Middleware is only instantiated once (a singleton), so everything you . I see your IAccountService injected into the middleware, so that seems to cause the issue. You must resolve it on per context basis in Invoke method, using context.RequestServices.GetRequiredServce<T>() – Tseng Jan 25 '17 at 16:38
10

Middleware is only instantiated once, so it's a singleton effectively.

Everything you inject into the Middlewares constructor is hence resolved from the singleton container (the one you can access via app.ApplicationServices inside Configure method).

I see that your IAccountService is injected into the middleware, so that seems to cause the issue. You must resolve it on per context basis in Invoke method, using

public Task Invoke(HttpContext context, IAccountService accountService)
{
    // If the request path doesn't match, skip
    if (!context.Request.Path.Equals(_options.Path, StringComparison.Ordinal))
    {
        return _next(context);
    }

    if (!context.Request.Method.Equals("POST")
       || !context.Request.ContentType.Contains("application/json"))
    {
        context.Response.StatusCode = 400;
        return context.Response.WriteAsync("Bad request.");
    }

    return GenerateToken(context, accountService);
}

or

public Task Invoke(HttpContext context)
{
    var accountService = context.RequestServices.GetRequiredService<IAccountService>();

    // If the request path doesn't match, skip
    if (!context.Request.Path.Equals(_options.Path, StringComparison.Ordinal))
    {
        return _next(context);
    }

    if (!context.Request.Method.Equals("POST")
       || !context.Request.ContentType.Contains("application/json"))
    {
        context.Response.StatusCode = 400;
        return context.Response.WriteAsync("Bad request.");
    }

    return GenerateToken(context, accountService);
}
2
  • Yup, I'll try that and see if it works, thanks for your help! – crizzwald Jan 25 '17 at 16:44
  • For anyone else trying to use context.RequestServices.GetRequiredService<...>() in net Core 1.1, you will need to add a using to Microsoft.Extensions.DependancyInjection – FirstDivision Apr 10 '17 at 18:38

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