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What's the difference between a process and a process image?

What does one contain that the other doesn't? What are the distinguishing components?

This is all within the context of process control structures and process location in memory.

  • The answer depends upon what you are referring to. A PROCESS only has one meaning while PROCESS IMAGE can have multiple meanings. Where and how do you see the term being used? – user3344003 Jan 27 '17 at 2:40
  • @user3344003 Thanks for the response. The terms were used in the context of process control structures and process location in memory. Further research suggests that the process image is just a process's allocated space in virtual memory? Therefore, both the process and process image can contain exactly the same components (program code, program data, stack, PCB)? I would appreciate it if someone could please clarify this. – handler's handle Jan 27 '17 at 3:02
  • PCB meaning what? Then, what is the scope of the image then? The process address space includes the system address space. If you are thinking of a process dump, that is typically just the user address. If you are talking to whole image of the process, that could include the user address range and the system address ranges. – user3344003 Jan 27 '17 at 4:17
  • @user3344003 PCB meaning process control block. So are you saying that a process image is just the physical manifestation of the process in virtual memory? – handler's handle Jan 27 '17 at 4:29
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From what I understand, a process image is an image of a process taken when memory is allocated to it before execution. This happens because, when multitasking, the kernel needs to re-enter the process where it left off. If the process were to be changed in mid execution, bad things could happen so the operating system makes a read-only version of the process and uses that during execution.

Here's a webpage with more details on process images

  • Thanks for the response. So the process image is just a process's allocated space in virtual memory? Therefore, both the process and process image can contain exactly the same components (program code, program data, stack, PCB)? – handler's handle Jan 26 '17 at 18:12
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    Yes. The only difference is that the process image is read only (in other words, uneditable) whereas the process can be changed at any point. – Gab Jan 27 '17 at 4:39
  • Interesting. And it being read only is due to the fact that it is in secondary memory rather than in main memory? If it was in main memory, it would be editable? – handler's handle Jan 27 '17 at 4:40
  • Its read only because during multi-tasking, the kernal needs to exit and re-enter the instructions in the process when it is its turn to access the CPU. If the process is changed while another process is running, when the scheduler comes back to the process in question, it will crash because the process is now different. – Gab Jan 27 '17 at 4:45
  • Ahh, I see. Thank you for the assistance. – handler's handle Jan 27 '17 at 4:48
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A process can involve more than its image. It is a live and changing image, hence the name, that is run by the CPU.
A single process can have multiple images at different intervals, along with its effect on the CPU that is not directly included in the image, like arithmetic operations.

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When a programme is loaded as a process it is allocated a section of virtual memory which forms its useable address space. Within this process image there are typically at least four elements :

Program code (or text)

The program instructions to be executed. Note that it is not necessary for the processor to read the totality of a process into physical memory when a program is run, instead by a procedure known as ?dynamic paging? the next block of instructions is loaded as required and may be shared between processes.

Program data

May be distinguished as initialised variables including external global and static variables, uninitialised variables (known as a bss area on Unix derivative systems). Data blocks are not shared between processes by default.

Stack

A process will commonly have at least two last-in, first-out (LIFO) stacks, including a user stack for user mode and a kernel stack for kernel mode.

Process Control Block

Information needed by the operating system to control the process.

Source

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