5

I have an array of integers of length 150 and the integers range from 1 to 3. For example,

array([1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1,
       1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1,
       1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2,
       2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2,
       2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3,
       3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3,
       3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3])

I would like to convert/map/transform

1 to [0,0,1]

2 to [0,1,0]

3 to [1,0,0]

Is there an efficient way to do that?

So the outputs is like

[0,0,1],[0,0,1],[0,0,1]...[1,0,0]
3
  • Have you tried using dictionaries? – João Areias Jan 26 '17 at 3:07
  • hmm.. I think I tried but can I map it to an array? [0,0,1] ... and so on. I tried but to no avail. Maybe I implemented it wrongly – misheekoh Jan 26 '17 at 3:08
  • I think you can – João Areias Jan 26 '17 at 3:09
7

First, encode your transform as an array (with a dummy first element since you don't map 0):

>>> mapping = np.array([[0,0,0],[0,0,1],[0,1,0],[1,0,0]])

Then it's trivial:

>>> arr = np.array([1,1,2,3,3,3])
>>> mapping[arr]
array([[0, 0, 1],
      [0, 0, 1],
      [0, 1, 0],
      [1, 0, 0],
      [1, 0, 0],
      [1, 0, 0]])
0
6

You can actually just compare them and set the appropriate items:

>>> # a bit shorter so it's easier to demonstrate
>>> arr = np.array([1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3])
>>> arr2 = np.zeros([arr.size, 3], arr.dtype)
>>> arr2[:, 0] = arr == 3
>>> arr2[:, 1] = arr == 2
>>> arr2[:, 2] = arr == 1

>>> arr2
array([[0, 0, 1],
       [0, 0, 1],
       [0, 1, 0],
       [0, 1, 0],
       [0, 1, 0],
       [1, 0, 0],
       [1, 0, 0],
       [1, 0, 0],
       [1, 0, 0],
       [1, 0, 0],
       [1, 0, 0],
       [1, 0, 0],
       [1, 0, 0],
       [1, 0, 0],
       [1, 0, 0],
       [1, 0, 0],
       [1, 0, 0],
       [1, 0, 0],
       [1, 0, 0]])

You said you were interested in efficiency, so I did some timings:

my_dict = {
    1:[0,0,1],
    2:[0,1,0],
    3:[1,0,0]
    }

mapping = np.array([[0,0,0],[0,0,1],[0,1,0],[1,0,0]])

def mine(arr):
    arr2 = np.zeros([arr.size, 3], arr.dtype)
    arr2[:, 0] = arr == 3
    arr2[:, 1] = arr == 2
    arr2[:, 2] = arr == 1
    return arr2

def JoaoAreias(arr):
    return [my_dict[i] for i in arr]

def JohnZwinck(arr):
    return mapping[arr]

def Divakar(arr):
    return (arr == np.arange(3,0,-1)[:,None]).T.astype(np.int8)

def Divakar2(arr):
    return np.take(mapping, arr,axis=0)

arr = np.random.randint(1, 4, (150))
np.testing.assert_array_equal(mine(arr), JohnZwinck(arr))
np.testing.assert_array_equal(mine(arr), mine_numba(arr))
np.testing.assert_array_equal(mine(arr), Divakar(arr))
np.testing.assert_array_equal(mine(arr), Divakar2(arr))
%timeit mine(arr)        # 5. - 10000 loops, best of 3: 48.3 µs per loop
%timeit JoaoAreias(arr)  # 6. - 10000 loops, best of 3: 179 µs per loop
%timeit JohnZwinck(arr)  # 3. - 10000 loops, best of 3: 24.1 µs per loop
%timeit mine_numba(arr)  # 1. - 100000 loops, best of 3: 6.02 µs per loop
%timeit Divakar(arr)     # 4. - 10000 loops, best of 3: 34.2 µs per loop
%timeit Divakar2(arr)    # 2. - 100000 loops, best of 3: 13.5 µs per loop

arr = np.random.randint(1, 4, (10000))
np.testing.assert_array_equal(mine(arr), JohnZwinck(arr))
np.testing.assert_array_equal(mine(arr), mine_numba(arr))
np.testing.assert_array_equal(mine(arr), Divakar(arr))
np.testing.assert_array_equal(mine(arr), Divakar2(arr))
%timeit mine(arr)        # 4. - 1000 loops, best of 3: 201 µs per loop
%timeit JoaoAreias(arr)  # 6. - 100 loops, best of 3: 10.2 ms per loop
%timeit JohnZwinck(arr)  # 5. - 1000 loops, best of 3: 455 µs per loop
%timeit mine_numba(arr)  # 1. - 10000 loops, best of 3: 103 µs per loop
%timeit Divakar(arr)     # 3. - 10000 loops, best of 3: 155 µs per loop
%timeit Divakar2(arr)    # 2. - 10000 loops, best of 3: 146 µs per loop

So it depends on your datasize which to prefer, if it's rather small than @JohnZwinck has the fastest solution, for "bigger" datasets my approach wins. :)


Actually if you're going to use something like (or alternativly cython or similar) you can beat all other approaches:

import numba as nb

@nb.njit
def mine_numba(arr):
    arr2 = np.zeros((arr.size, 3), arr.dtype)
    for idx in range(arr.size):
        item = arr[idx]
        if item == 1:
            arr2[idx, 2] = 1
        elif item == 2:
            arr2[idx, 1] = 1
        else:
            arr2[idx, 0] = 1
    return arr2
5
  • Nice timings. You can make your version even slightly faster by adding order='F' to the zeros() call. That makes it more efficient when you assign the values column-wise. – John Zwinck Jan 26 '17 at 3:48
  • Hmm! Very nice. Since the data I'm working on is small, John's one is sufficient. But I'll keep this in mind! – misheekoh Jan 26 '17 at 3:52
  • @JohnZwinck I actually tried that (or something similar: I created a transposed array and returned the np.transpose) but for small data sets this is marginally slower (while being up to 10-20% faster on huge arrays). The numba solution (probably overkill :-)) I had was much more interesting and faster. – MSeifert Jan 26 '17 at 4:04
  • I added two approaches and timed those against others. But couldn't test out for numba. Would you be kind enough to include mine into your results? – Divakar Jan 26 '17 at 7:34
  • @Divakar of course. Your second approach is really fast. I definetly need to use np.take more often. :) – MSeifert Jan 26 '17 at 8:21
3

how about this?

a = [1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3]
b = []

for i in a:
    if i == 1:
        b.append([0,0,1])
    elif i == 2:
        b.append([0,1,0])
    else:
        b.append([1,0,0])

print(b)

#[[0, 0, 1], [0, 0, 1], [0, 0, 1], [0, 1, 0], [0, 1, 0], [0, 1, 0], [1, 0, 0], [1, 0, 0], [1, 0, 0]]
3

I would do it using dictionaries and list comprehension, like this

'''
This is a dictionary to map your values
'''
my_dict = {
    1:[0,0,1],
    2:[0,1,0],
    3:[1,0,0]
    }
'''
This is your original Array
'''
my_array = [1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1,
       1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1,
       1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2,
       2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2,
       2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3,
       3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3,
       3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3]
'''
Use list comprehention to map one to another
'''
my_new_array = [my_dict[i] for i in my_array]
7
  • 1
    But almost certainly not very efficient compared to any numpy solution. However this is probably the fastest pure-python solution! – MSeifert Jan 26 '17 at 3:26
  • 2
    @JoãoAreias: Big-O is not relevant--a NumPy solution will absolutely destroy a dict solution if the data are even moderately large. OP is already using NumPy, so the import is already done. – John Zwinck Jan 26 '17 at 3:31
  • 1
    @JoãoAreias: NumPy does all the heavy lifting using optimized C and Fortran code. In this case it's 10x faster than using dict. Not to mention that the dict solution has to do an indirect (hash table) lookup every time, whereas the NumPy array solution I posted uses direct array indexing. – John Zwinck Jan 26 '17 at 3:39
  • 2
    @JoãoAreias I did some benchmarks in my answer. NumPy can do very fast implicit iterations. Much faster than python. The fact that your solution is only a factor 4 (to 50) slower is actually pretty amazing. – MSeifert Jan 26 '17 at 3:40
  • 1
    Cool, thanks guys, I guess I will start using numpy way more than I usually do. And by the way, your answer was pretty clever. – João Areias Jan 26 '17 at 3:43
2

Approach #1 : Using NumPy broadcasting -

(arr == np.arange(3,0,-1)[:,None]).T.astype(np.int8)

Approach #2 : Similar to @John Zwinck's idea of indexing, but with np.take along the first axis, which helps here because the indices are hugely repeated. These are timed in this previous post.

mapping = np.array([[0,0,0],[0,0,1],[0,1,0],[1,0,0]])
out = np.take(mapping, arr,axis=0)

Runtime test using @MSeifert's benchmark setup -

In [85]: arr = np.random.randint(1, 4, (10000))

In [86]: %timeit MSeifert(arr)
    ...: %timeit JoaoAreias(arr)
    ...: %timeit JohnZwinck(arr)
    ...: 
10000 loops, best of 3: 105 µs per loop
100 loops, best of 3: 2.97 ms per loop
1000 loops, best of 3: 240 µs per loop

# Approach #1 
In [87]: %timeit (arr == np.arange(3,0,-1)[:,None]).T.astype(np.int8)
10000 loops, best of 3: 44.1 µs per loop

# Approach #2
In [88]: %timeit np.take(mapping, arr,axis=0)
10000 loops, best of 3: 73 µs per loop
1

Solution using list comprehension if you have range from 1 to 3:

>>> [([0,0,1] if x==1 else [0,1,0] if x==2 else [1,0,0]) for x in c]

[[0, 0, 1], [0, 0, 1], [0, 0, 1], [0, 0, 1], [0, 0, 1], [0, 0, 1], [0, 0, 1], [0, 0, 1], [0, 0, 1], [0, 0, 1], [0, 0, 1], [0, 0, 1], [0, 0, 1], [0, 0, 1], [0, 0, 1], [0, 0, 1], [0, 0, 1], [0, 0, 1], [0, 0, 1], [0, 0, 1], [0, 0, 1], [0, 0, 1], [0, 0, 1], [0, 0, 1], [0, 0, 1], [0, 0, 1], [0, 0, 1], [0, 0, 1], [0, 0, 1], [0, 0, 1], [0, 0, 1], [0, 0, 1], [0, 0, 1], [0, 0, 1], [0, 0, 1], [0, 0, 1], [0, 0, 1], [0, 0, 1], [0, 0, 1], [0, 0, 1], [0, 0, 1], [0, 0, 1], [0, 0, 1], [0, 0, 1], [0, 0, 1], [0, 0, 1], [0, 0, 1], [0, 0, 1], [0, 0, 1], [0, 0, 1], [0, 1, 0], [0, 1, 0], [0, 1, 0], [0, 1, 0], [0, 1, 0], [0, 1, 0], [0, 1, 0], [0, 1, 0], [0, 1, 0], [0, 1, 0], [0, 1, 0], [0, 1, 0], [0, 1, 0], [0, 1, 0], [0, 1, 0], [0, 1, 0], [0, 1, 0], [0, 1, 0], [0, 1, 0], [0, 1, 0], [0, 1, 0], [0, 1, 0], [0, 1, 0], [0, 1, 0], [0, 1, 0], [0, 1, 0], [0, 1, 0], [0, 1, 0], [0, 1, 0], [0, 1, 0], [0, 1, 0], [0, 1, 0], [0, 1, 0], [0, 1, 0], [0, 1, 0], [0, 1, 0], [0, 1, 0], [0, 1, 0], [0, 1, 0], [0, 1, 0], [0, 1, 0], [0, 1, 0], [0, 1, 0], [0, 1, 0], [0, 1, 0], [0, 1, 0], [0, 1, 0], [0, 1, 0], [0, 1, 0], [0, 1, 0], [1, 0, 0], [1, 0, 0], [1, 0, 0], [1, 0, 0], [1, 0, 0], [1, 0, 0], [1, 0, 0], [1, 0, 0], [1, 0, 0], [1, 0, 0], [1, 0, 0], [1, 0, 0], [1, 0, 0], [1, 0, 0], [1, 0, 0], [1, 0, 0], [1, 0, 0], [1, 0, 0], [1, 0, 0], [1, 0, 0], [1, 0, 0], [1, 0, 0], [1, 0, 0], [1, 0, 0], [1, 0, 0], [1, 0, 0], [1, 0, 0], [1, 0, 0], [1, 0, 0], [1, 0, 0], [1, 0, 0], [1, 0, 0], [1, 0, 0], [1, 0, 0], [1, 0, 0], [1, 0, 0], [1, 0, 0], [1, 0, 0], [1, 0, 0], [1, 0, 0], [1, 0, 0], [1, 0, 0], [1, 0, 0], [1, 0, 0], [1, 0, 0], [1, 0, 0], [1, 0, 0], [1, 0, 0], [1, 0, 0], [1, 0, 0]]

This is more pythonic and fast.

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