33

What is the alternative of ng-init="myText='Hello World!'" in Angular 2 to add in the template, not in the component

 <div ng-app="" ng-init="myText='Hello World!'">

the alternative in Angular 2

5
  • 1
    Above one is angular1 sample. i am expecting the alternative in angular2
    – Shamil
    Jan 26, 2017 at 4:13
  • Out of curiosity, what's your purpose in using ng-init in Angular2? Jan 26, 2017 at 4:14
  • Expecting something like this *ngOnInit = "checkCategoryStart = checkCategoryStart != row.category && row.category"
    – Shamil
    Jan 26, 2017 at 4:15
  • 1
    i am using inside the *ngFor
    – Shamil
    Jan 26, 2017 at 4:15
  • I don't think there's something like ng-init on Angular2. Anyway you can do this kind of thing on component instead of template. Jan 26, 2017 at 4:20

10 Answers 10

28

You can use a directive

@Directive({
  selector: 'ngInit',
  exportAs: 'ngInit'
}) 
export class NgInit {
  @Input() values: any = {};

  @Input() ngInit;
  ngOnInit() {
    if(this.ngInit) { this.ngInit(); }
  }  
}

you can use it to pass a function to be called like

<div [ngInit]="doSomething"

or to make values available

<div ngInit [values]="{a: 'a', b: 'b'}" #ngInit="ngInit">
  <button (click)="clickHandler(ngInit.values.a)">click me</button>
</div>
  • ngInit addes the directive
  • [values]="{a: 'a', b: 'b'}" sets some initial values
  • #ngInit="ngInit" creates a reference for later use
  • ngInit.values.a reads the a value from the created reference.

See also Converting Angular 1 to Angular 2 ngInit function

8
  • 1
    here is a plunker: plnkr.co/edit/HmWHjM8wa8gIhuClGdO2?p=preview . in almost all cases if you are looking at this you should probably ng g component youNeedAComponent +1 for exportAs example. Jul 28, 2017 at 6:48
  • 1
    nice hack. :) (y) Aug 17, 2017 at 7:39
  • How about passing a parm in method like <div [ngInit]="doSomething(parm)"? How should it be handled in the custom directive? Sep 13, 2017 at 3:09
  • Binding to functions is usually a bad idea, because it will be called every time change detection runs. Besides that I don't understand your question. There shouldn't be any need to handle it in a special way. Sep 13, 2017 at 3:34
  • @Rishi don't know what you mean. Why would it not work with *ngFor? Jun 7, 2018 at 11:33
10

Another approach is by using the @Output decorator and EventEmitter:

import {Directive, OnInit, Output, EventEmitter} from '@angular/core';

@Directive({
    selector: '[ngInit]'
})
export class NgInitDirective implements OnInit {

    @Output()
    ngInit: EventEmitter<any> = new EventEmitter();

    ngOnInit() {
        this.ngInit.emit();
    }
}

And then use it like:

<div *ngIf="condition" (ngInit)="initialize()">  ... </div>

Demo

1
5
@Directive({
  selector: '[ngxInit]',
})
export class NgxInitDirective {
  constructor(
    private templateRef: TemplateRef<any>,
    private viewContainer: ViewContainerRef) {
  }

  @Input() set ngxInit(val: any) {
    this.viewContainer.clear();
    this.viewContainer.createEmbeddedView(this.templateRef, {ngxInit: val});
  }
}

a value expression is set via *ngxInit and published using as micro-syntax:

<div *ngxInit="3 * i + j as idx">{{idx}}</div>

published as https://www.npmjs.com/package/ngx-init

2
4

You do not always need a custom directive for this. If you're okay with your function being called more than once, you can simple do:

<input #input [attr.init]="resizeInput(input)"/>

The word "init" there is completely arbitrary. The downside is yourInitFunction will get called on every digest cycle.

Note, if you return anything from your function this will add an attribute called "init" to your element with the returned value. If you return undefined, it will not add the attribute.

This is normally a non-issue, just keep it in mind.

3

It is possible by using OnInit Life Cycle hook as below,

  1. Import OnInit from core library

    import {Component, OnInit} from '@angular/core'
    
  2. Implement it to your component class

    export class App  implements OnInit {
    
    }
    
  3. Implement the ngOnInit method

     ngOnInit(){
        this.myText='Hello World!'
    
       }
    

LIVE DEMO

2
  • 1
    Note that the implements clause is completely optional as is the import of OnInit. Jan 26, 2017 at 6:16
  • Create a new scoped variable for each item inside ngFor
    – Warren
    Apr 18, 2018 at 22:04
2

While I agree that initialization should go into the ngOnInit life-cycle hook, it should also be noted that you can use the constructor of the component to initialize class members. In your simple example, you could even use the member declaration to set the variable, e.g.:

@Component({ template: '<div>{{myText}}</div>' })
export class MyComponent {
    myText = 'Hello World!';
}
0

Little Update! In the latest versions of Angular this will not work:

@Directive({
 selector: 'ngInit',
 exportAs: 'ngInit'
})

you should use '[]':

@Directive({
   selector: '[ngInit]',
   exportAs: 'ngInit'
})
0

A possible improvement over Günter's answer:

@Directive({
  selector: 'ngInit',
  exportAs: 'ngInit'
}) 
export class NgInit {
  @Input() ngInit: () => any;
  ngOnInit() {
    if(typeof this.ngInit === 'function') { 
        this.ngInit(); 
    } else {
        // preventing re-evaluation (described below)
        throw 'something';
    }
  }  
}

And then use higher-order functions for passing in data, like so:

// component.ts
myInitFunction(info) {
  // returns another function
  return () => console.log(info);
}

If you use a higher-order function like this, you also don't need to worry about what this is inside of myInitFunction since an arrow function is really what is passed.

Use the directive like so:

// component.html
<another-component #ref></another-component>
<div [ngInit]="myInitFunction(ref)"></div>

If you were to try and create a directive that doesn't pass in a function as the input in the manner described here, you run the risk of infinite loops. For example, you'd get that if you whole directive was simply evaluating the expression you gave it.

This is what would happen if your myInitFunction method didn't return another function (and your HTML was the same as above). You'd console out, return undefined, and then change detection would re-evaluate it, consoling out over and over.

0

I found a fairly easy fix for this problem using the data attribute. In my example, i just use it to show, but a toggle or whatever is possible using the same method obviously.

<div data-expand="false" #expandWrap>
  <span *ngIf="expandWrap.dataset.expand == 'false'">
    {{'Test expand without..'}}
    <span (click)="expandWrap.dataset.expand = 'true'">more</span>
  </span>
  <span *ngIf="expandWrap.dataset.expand == 'true'">
       {{'Test expand with more text because now we are expanded!'}}
  </span>
</div>

I made a small demo on stackblitz on how this works

0

How about this?:

@Directive({
  selector: '[onInit]'
})
export class OnInitDirective implements OnInit {
  @Output() onInit = new EventEmitter<void>();

  ngOnInit(): void {
    this.onInit.emit();
  }
}

Use like this:

<div (onInit)="doSomeStuff(someValue)"></div>

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