-1

This question already has an answer here:

Hi there trying to add an argument to an alias in bash. I'm using a Mac. I've searched a number of related questions: Alias in Bash, Alias in Bash with autocomplete, and a few others yet still can't sort this out. I know I need to use a function to create an alias that takes an input but it's unclear if its meant to look like any of the below options. All inputs in .bash_profile.

function mins_ago () { `expr $(date +%s) - 60 \* "$1"`; }

alias mins_ago = function mins_ago () { `expr $(date +%s) - 60 \* "$1"`; }

alias mins_ago = "function mins_ago () { `expr $(date +%s) - 60 \* "$1"`; }"

alias mins_ago = function mins_ago () { `expr $(date +%s) - 60 \* $1`; }

None of these seem to work. I either get a syntax error or it doesn't recognize the argument.

What is the actual line you'd put in .bash_profile to sort this properly? Thank you in advance. Is the alias bit included or do I just proceed to the function definition?

marked as duplicate by tripleee bash Jan 31 '18 at 12:29

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2

Defining alias is not the right approach when you can easily do it with functions, and use the bash, arithmetic operator $(())

function mins_ago() {
    printf "%s" "$(( $(date +%s) - (60 * $1) ))"
}

Add the above function in .bash_profile, and now testing it in the command-line,

date +%s
1485414114

value="$(mins_ago 3)"
printf "%s\n" "$value"
1485413834

(or) without a temporary variable to convert to readable format in GNU date, do

printf "%s\n" "$(date -d@$(mins_ago 3))"
  • I'm running what you posted above. Ah! source ~/.bash_profile didn't take for some reason, but exiting and trying again worked. Thank you sir. – HectorOfTroy407 Jan 26 '17 at 7:21
  • @HectorOfTroy407: Happy to be of help! – Inian Jan 26 '17 at 7:22
1

add this to your .bashrc and source it

mins_ago() {
  if [[ $@ != "" ]]; then
    command expr $(date +%s) - 60 \* "$@"
  else
    command echo "command error: mins_ago <integer>"
  fi
}

output:

$ mins_ago 1
1485414404
$ mins_ago
command error: mins_ago <integer>
0

Remove the backticks from your first try, and you should be fine.

The function will then output the timestamp, and you can write echo "$(mins_ago)".

0

Just type

mins_ago () {
 `expr $(date +%s) - 60 \* "$1"`; 
}

It works for GNU bash 4.1.2:

$ mins_ago 5
bash: 1485411776: command not found

To avoid the error, use echo:

mins_ago () {
 echo `expr $(date +%s) - 60 \* "$1"` 
}
  • Rather than adding echo, remove the backquotes. – Gordon Davisson Jan 26 '17 at 6:42
  • -bash: /Users/CloudFlare/.bash_profile: line 13: syntax error near unexpected token {expr $(date +%s) - 60 \* $1' -bash: /Users/CloudFlare/.bash_profile: line 13: function _hours(){expr $(date +%s) - 60 * $1;} _hours ' when i try mins_ago () { expr $(date +%s - 60 \* "$1"; } – HectorOfTroy407 Jan 26 '17 at 6:51
  • @HectorOfTroy407: Can you try my answer above? – Inian Jan 26 '17 at 6:54

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.