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After I learned how to use einsum, I am now trying to understand how np.tensordot works.

However, I am a little bit lost especially regarding the various possibilities for the parameter axes.

To understand it, as I have never practiced tensor calculus, I use the following example:

A = np.random.randint(2, size=(2, 3, 5))
B = np.random.randint(2, size=(3, 2, 4))

In this case, what are the different possible np.tensordot and how would you compute it manually?

0
54

The idea with tensordot is pretty simple - We input the arrays and the respective axes along which the sum-reductions are intended. The axes that take part in sum-reduction are removed in the output and all of the remaining axes from the input arrays are spread-out as different axes in the output keeping the order in which the input arrays are fed.

Let's look at few sample cases with one and two axes of sum-reductions and also swap the input places and see how the order is kept in the output.

I. One axis of sum-reduction

Inputs :

 In [7]: A = np.random.randint(2, size=(2, 6, 5))
   ...:  B = np.random.randint(2, size=(3, 2, 4))
   ...: 

Case #1:

In [9]: np.tensordot(A, B, axes=((0),(1))).shape
Out[9]: (6, 5, 3, 4)

A : (2, 6, 5) -> reduction of axis=0
B : (3, 2, 4) -> reduction of axis=1

Output : `(2, 6, 5)`, `(3, 2, 4)` ===(2 gone)==> `(6,5)` + `(3,4)` => `(6,5,3,4)`

Case #2 (same as case #1 but the inputs are fed swapped):

In [8]: np.tensordot(B, A, axes=((1),(0))).shape
Out[8]: (3, 4, 6, 5)

B : (3, 2, 4) -> reduction of axis=1
A : (2, 6, 5) -> reduction of axis=0

Output : `(3, 2, 4)`, `(2, 6, 5)` ===(2 gone)==> `(3,4)` + `(6,5)` => `(3,4,6,5)`.

II. Two axes of sum-reduction

Inputs :

In [11]: A = np.random.randint(2, size=(2, 3, 5))
    ...: B = np.random.randint(2, size=(3, 2, 4))
    ...: 

Case #1:

In [12]: np.tensordot(A, B, axes=((0,1),(1,0))).shape
Out[12]: (5, 4)

A : (2, 3, 5) -> reduction of axis=(0,1)
B : (3, 2, 4) -> reduction of axis=(1,0)

Output : `(2, 3, 5)`, `(3, 2, 4)` ===(2,3 gone)==> `(5)` + `(4)` => `(5,4)`

Case #2:

In [14]: np.tensordot(B, A, axes=((1,0),(0,1))).shape
Out[14]: (4, 5)

B : (3, 2, 4) -> reduction of axis=(1,0)
A : (2, 3, 5) -> reduction of axis=(0,1)

Output : `(3, 2, 4)`, `(2, 3, 5)` ===(2,3 gone)==> `(4)` + `(5)` => `(4,5)`

We can extend this to as many axes as possible.

21
  • 1
    What do you exactly mean by sum-reduction? – floflo29 Jan 26 '17 at 11:56
  • 5
    @floflo29 Well you might know that matrix-multiplication involves elementwise multiplication keeping an axis aligned and then summation of elements along that common aligned axis. With that summation, we are losing that common axis, which is termed as reduction, so in short sum-reduction. – Divakar Jan 26 '17 at 12:05
  • 2
    @BryanHead The only way to reorder the output axes using np.tensordot is to swap the inputs. If it doesn't get you your desired one, transpose would be the way to go. – Divakar May 19 '17 at 17:47
  • 1
    Would have been better if @Divakar have added the example starting from 1-D tensor along with how each entry is computed. E.g. t1=K.variable([[1,2],[2,3]] ) t2=K.variable([2,3]) print(K.eval(tf.tensordot(t1,t2,axes=0))) output: [[[2. 3.] [4. 6.]] [[4. 6.] [6. 9.]]] Not sure how the output shape is 2x2x2. – CKM Aug 20 '19 at 16:31
  • 1
    @dereks The sum-reduction term used in this post is an umbrella term for element-wise multiplication and then sum-reduction. In the context of dot/tensordot, I assumed it would be safe to put it that way. Apologies if that was confusing. Now, with matrix-multiplication you have one axis of sum-reduction (second axis of first array against first axis of second array), whereas in tensordot more than one axes of sum-reduction. The examples presented show how axes are aligned in the input arrays and how the output axes are obtained from those. – Divakar Nov 21 '19 at 15:25
7

tensordot swaps axes and reshapes the inputs so it can apply np.dot to 2 2d arrays. It then swaps and reshapes back to the target. It may be easier to experiment than to explain. There's no special tensor math going on, just extending dot to work in higher dimensions. tensor just means arrays with more than 2d. If you are already comfortable with einsum then it will be simplest compare the results to that.

A sample test, summing on 1 pair of axes

In [823]: np.tensordot(A,B,[0,1]).shape
Out[823]: (3, 5, 3, 4)
In [824]: np.einsum('ijk,lim',A,B).shape
Out[824]: (3, 5, 3, 4)
In [825]: np.allclose(np.einsum('ijk,lim',A,B),np.tensordot(A,B,[0,1]))
Out[825]: True

another, summing on two.

In [826]: np.tensordot(A,B,[(0,1),(1,0)]).shape
Out[826]: (5, 4)
In [827]: np.einsum('ijk,jim',A,B).shape
Out[827]: (5, 4)
In [828]: np.allclose(np.einsum('ijk,jim',A,B),np.tensordot(A,B,[(0,1),(1,0)]))
Out[828]: True

We could do same with the (1,0) pair. Given the mix of dimension I don't think there's another combination.

3
  • I still don't fully grasp it :(. In the 1st example from the docs they are multiplying element-wise 2 arrays with shape (4,3) and then doing sum over those 2 axes. How could you get that same result using a dot product? – Brenlla Apr 22 '19 at 12:30
  • The way I could reproduce the 1st result from the docs is by using np.dot on flattened 2-D arrays: for aa in a.T: for bb in b.T: print(aa.ravel().dot(bb.T.ravel())) – Brenlla Apr 22 '19 at 13:12
  • 1
    The einsum equivalent of tensordot with axes=([1,0],[0,1]), is np.einsum('ijk,jil->kl',a,b). This dot also does it: a.T.reshape(5,12).dot(b.reshape(12,2)). The dot is between a (5,12) and (12,2). The a.T puts the 5 first, and also swaps the (3,4) to match b. – hpaulj Apr 23 '19 at 2:43
2

The answers above are great and helped me a lot in understanding tensordot. But they don't show actual math behind operations. That's why I did equivalent operations in TF 2 for myself and decided to share them here:

a = tf.constant([1,2.])
b = tf.constant([2,3.])
print(f"{tf.tensordot(a, b, 0)}\t tf.einsum('i,j', a, b)\t\t- ((the last 0 axes of a), (the first 0 axes of b))")
print(f"{tf.tensordot(a, b, ((),()))}\t tf.einsum('i,j', a, b)\t\t- ((() axis of a), (() axis of b))")
print(f"{tf.tensordot(b, a, 0)}\t tf.einsum('i,j->ji', a, b)\t- ((the last 0 axes of b), (the first 0 axes of a))")
print(f"{tf.tensordot(a, b, 1)}\t\t tf.einsum('i,i', a, b)\t\t- ((the last 1 axes of a), (the first 1 axes of b))")
print(f"{tf.tensordot(a, b, ((0,), (0,)))}\t\t tf.einsum('i,i', a, b)\t\t- ((0th axis of a), (0th axis of b))")
print(f"{tf.tensordot(a, b, (0,0))}\t\t tf.einsum('i,i', a, b)\t\t- ((0th axis of a), (0th axis of b))")

[[2. 3.]
 [4. 6.]]    tf.einsum('i,j', a, b)     - ((the last 0 axes of a), (the first 0 axes of b))
[[2. 3.]
 [4. 6.]]    tf.einsum('i,j', a, b)     - ((() axis of a), (() axis of b))
[[2. 4.]
 [3. 6.]]    tf.einsum('i,j->ji', a, b) - ((the last 0 axes of b), (the first 0 axes of a))
8.0          tf.einsum('i,i', a, b)     - ((the last 1 axes of a), (the first 1 axes of b))
8.0          tf.einsum('i,i', a, b)     - ((0th axis of a), (0th axis of b))
8.0          tf.einsum('i,i', a, b)     - ((0th axis of a), (0th axis of b))

And for (2,2) shape:

a = tf.constant([[1,2],
                 [-2,3.]])

b = tf.constant([[-2,3],
                 [0,4.]])
print(f"{tf.tensordot(a, b, 0)}\t tf.einsum('ij,kl', a, b)\t- ((the last 0 axes of a), (the first 0 axes of b))")
print(f"{tf.tensordot(a, b, (0,0))}\t tf.einsum('ij,ik', a, b)\t- ((0th axis of a), (0th axis of b))")
print(f"{tf.tensordot(a, b, (0,1))}\t tf.einsum('ij,ki', a, b)\t- ((0th axis of a), (1st axis of b))")
print(f"{tf.tensordot(a, b, 1)}\t tf.matmul(a, b)\t\t- ((the last 1 axes of a), (the first 1 axes of b))")
print(f"{tf.tensordot(a, b, ((1,), (0,)))}\t tf.einsum('ij,jk', a, b)\t- ((1st axis of a), (0th axis of b))")
print(f"{tf.tensordot(a, b, (1, 0))}\t tf.matmul(a, b)\t\t- ((1st axis of a), (0th axis of b))")
print(f"{tf.tensordot(a, b, 2)}\t tf.reduce_sum(tf.multiply(a, b))\t- ((the last 2 axes of a), (the first 2 axes of b))")
print(f"{tf.tensordot(a, b, ((0,1), (0,1)))}\t tf.einsum('ij,ij->', a, b)\t\t- ((0th axis of a, 1st axis of a), (0th axis of b, 1st axis of b))")
[[[[-2.  3.]
   [ 0.  4.]]
  [[-4.  6.]
   [ 0.  8.]]]

 [[[ 4. -6.]
   [-0. -8.]]
  [[-6.  9.]
   [ 0. 12.]]]]  tf.einsum('ij,kl', a, b)   - ((the last 0 axes of a), (the first 0 axes of b))
[[-2. -5.]
 [-4. 18.]]      tf.einsum('ij,ik', a, b)   - ((0th axis of a), (0th axis of b))
[[-8. -8.]
 [ 5. 12.]]      tf.einsum('ij,ki', a, b)   - ((0th axis of a), (1st axis of b))
[[-2. 11.]
 [ 4.  6.]]      tf.matmul(a, b)            - ((the last 1 axes of a), (the first 1 axes of b))
[[-2. 11.]
 [ 4.  6.]]      tf.einsum('ij,jk', a, b)   - ((1st axis of a), (0th axis of b))
[[-2. 11.]
 [ 4.  6.]]      tf.matmul(a, b)            - ((1st axis of a), (0th axis of b))
16.0    tf.reduce_sum(tf.multiply(a, b))    - ((the last 2 axes of a), (the first 2 axes of b))
16.0    tf.einsum('ij,ij->', a, b)          - ((0th axis of a, 1st axis of a), (0th axis of b, 1st axis of b))

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