200

Suppose I have a value of 15.7784514, I want to display it 15.77 with no rounding.

var num = parseFloat(15.7784514);
document.write(num.toFixed(1)+"<br />");
document.write(num.toFixed(2)+"<br />");
document.write(num.toFixed(3)+"<br />");
document.write(num.toFixed(10));

Results in -

15.8
15.78
15.778
15.7784514000 

How do I display 15.77?

  • 3
    I'm tempted to ask, why you don't want rounding? It seems incorrect no matter where... – Camilo Martin Nov 24 '12 at 10:48
  • 44
    It's useful when displaying currency. – Richard Ye Dec 16 '12 at 5:00
  • @ mik01aj - When displaying currency, it is more common to truncate calculated values, rather than rounding them. For example, most tax forms in the US truncate rather than round calculated fractional cents. In that case, the truncated value is the correct value. – Steven Byks Feb 10 '17 at 18:06
  • 4
    @CamiloMartin there is a huge difference between a debt of 1.49 billion dollars and 1.0 billion dollars. – Broda Noel Feb 1 '19 at 20:07
  • 3
    There is also a huge difference between 1.49 billion and 1.50 billion dollars. That's $100 million. – Liga Sep 24 '19 at 8:05

36 Answers 36

229

Convert the number into a string, match the number up to the second decimal place:

function calc(theform) {
    var num = theform.original.value, rounded = theform.rounded
    var with2Decimals = num.toString().match(/^-?\d+(?:\.\d{0,2})?/)[0]
    rounded.value = with2Decimals
}
<form onsubmit="return calc(this)">
Original number: <input name="original" type="text" onkeyup="calc(form)" onchange="calc(form)" />
<br />"Rounded" number: <input name="rounded" type="text" placeholder="readonly" readonly>
</form>

The toFixed method fails in some cases unlike toString, so be very careful with it.

| improve this answer | |
  • 22
    +1 That should solve the rounding issue. I'd still output the result of the above using toFixed, though, so: (Math.floor(value * 100) / 100).toFixed(2). As you probably know, weird precision things can happen with floating point values (and on the other side of the spectrum, if the number happens to be 15, sounds like the OP wants 15.00). – T.J. Crowder Nov 15 '10 at 17:38
  • 1
    hehe, or if you combine both: Number((15.7784514000*100).toString().match(/^\d+/)/100); – skobaljic Oct 21 '13 at 12:08
  • 28
    Math.floor(value * 100) / 100 won't work if value = 4.27 seriously, try it. – Dark Hippo Jan 17 '14 at 16:56
  • 3
    @DarkHippo Thats because 4.27 is actually 4.26999999999, Math.round is generally a better solution, albeit not the answer to the original question. Realistically given the output is a string this should be done using string manipulation instead of a numeric solution with all the floating point foibles. – BJury Apr 2 '14 at 10:04
  • 3
    ...that doesn't sound right. Converting between types under any circumstances seems roundabout and unsafe. Unless a really advanced programmer would argue that "all types are just streams" or something. – JackHasaKeyboard Aug 18 '17 at 6:19
67

Update 5 Nov 2016

New answer, always accurate

function toFixed(num, fixed) {
    var re = new RegExp('^-?\\d+(?:\.\\d{0,' + (fixed || -1) + '})?');
    return num.toString().match(re)[0];
}

As floating point math in javascript will always have edge cases, the previous solution will be accurate most of the time which is not good enough. There are some solutions to this like num.toPrecision, BigDecimal.js, and accounting.js. Yet, I believe that merely parsing the string will be the simplest and always accurate.

Basing the update on the well written regex from the accepted answer by @Gumbo, this new toFixed function will always work as expected.


Old answer, not always accurate.

Roll your own toFixed function:

function toFixed(num, fixed) {
    fixed = fixed || 0;
    fixed = Math.pow(10, fixed);
    return Math.floor(num * fixed) / fixed;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 7
    toFixed(4.56, 2) = 4.55 – cryss Oct 31 '16 at 9:17
  • 2
    So many of these answers have a multiplication inside a Math.floor() function. This will fail for some numbers! Floating point arithmetic is not accurate and you need to use different methods. – Nico Westerdale Nov 4 '16 at 15:33
  • 1
    function toFixedCustom(num, fixed) { var re = new RegExp('^-?\\d+(?:\.\\d{0,' + (fixed || -1) + '})?'); if(num.toString().match(re) ){ return num.toString().match(re)[0]; } } – Ryan Augustine May 8 '18 at 10:26
  • 2
    The updated answer will fail for a number big or small enough that javascript would represent in scientific notation. toFixed(0.0000000052, 2) yields '5.2'. This can be fixed by using return num.toFixed(fixed+1).match(re)[0]; Notice I'm using toFixed with one decimal place above the target to avoid rounding, then running your regex match – Netherdan Sep 27 '19 at 12:49
35

I opted to write this instead to manually remove the remainder with strings so I don't have to deal with the math issues that come with numbers:

num = num.toString(); //If it's not already a String
num = num.slice(0, (num.indexOf("."))+3); //With 3 exposing the hundredths place
Number(num); //If you need it back as a Number

This will give you "15.77" with num = 15.7784514;

| improve this answer | |
  • 5
    If you're not forcing a decimal, you may want to add a conditional in case you encounter whole numbers. Like this: num = num.toString(); if(num.indexOf(".") > 0){num = num.slice(0, (num.indexOf("."))+3)}; Number(num); – ベンノスケ Oct 11 '12 at 1:12
  • 1
    nice if it has decimals but if it's an integer it will fail – Ruslan López Jun 8 '16 at 21:57
  • If the num is 0.00000052, then it will be wrong getting 5.2e – Vasanth Jul 21 '16 at 19:05
  • 1
    @Vasanth If the number is 0.00000052 it returns "0.00". Maybe the answer has been edited since – Drenai Dec 5 '17 at 14:58
  • Yeah, it fails in edge cases – VPaul May 15 '19 at 13:40
18

October 2017

General solution to truncate (no rounding) a number to the n-th decimal digit and convert it to a string with exactly n decimal digits, for any n≥0.

function toFixedTrunc(x, n) {
  const v = (typeof x === 'string' ? x : x.toString()).split('.');
  if (n <= 0) return v[0];
  let f = v[1] || '';
  if (f.length > n) return `${v[0]}.${f.substr(0,n)}`;
  while (f.length < n) f += '0';
  return `${v[0]}.${f}`
}

where x can be either a number (which gets converted into a string) or a string.

Here are some tests for n=2 (including the one requested by OP):

0           => 0.00
0.01        => 0.01
0.5839      => 0.58
0.999       => 0.99
1.01        => 1.01
2           => 2.00
2.551       => 2.55
2.99999     => 2.99
4.27        => 4.27
15.7784514  => 15.77
123.5999    => 123.59
0.000000199 => 1.99 *

* As mentioned in the note, that's due to javascript implicit conversion into exponential for "1.99e-7" And for some other values of n:

15.001097   => 15.0010 (n=4)
0.000003298 => 0.0000032 (n=7)
0.000003298257899 => 0.000003298257 (n=12)
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    toFixedTrunc(0.000000199, 2) // 1.99 – Maharramoff May 19 '19 at 21:34
  • 1
    @ShamkhalMaharramov: if you open the development console and enter 0.000000199 what do you get? You get 1.99e-7. Also, if you enter 0.000000199.toString() what do you get? You get "1.99e-7" So, when you pass 0.000000199 to the function, it ends up working on "1.99e-7" not "0.000000199" and "correctly" returns "1.99". See ecma-international.org/ecma-262/6.0/… – SC1000 Aug 15 '19 at 12:44
13

parseInt is faster then Math.floor

function floorFigure(figure, decimals){
    if (!decimals) decimals = 2;
    var d = Math.pow(10,decimals);
    return (parseInt(figure*d)/d).toFixed(decimals);
};

floorFigure(123.5999)    =>   "123.59"
floorFigure(123.5999, 3) =>   "123.599"
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    it fails with 1234567.89 – Ruslan López Jun 8 '16 at 21:47
  • Could you elaborate Lopez? – zardilior Oct 14 '16 at 13:39
  • 3
    floorFigure(4.56, 2) = 4.55 – cryss Oct 31 '16 at 9:18
8
num = 19.66752
f = num.toFixed(3).slice(0,-1)
alert(f)

This will return 19.66

| improve this answer | |
  • 6
    (4.9999).toFixed(3).slice(0, -1) returns 5.00, expected result is 4.99. – Bruno Lemos Apr 6 '18 at 5:32
  • 1
    I recommend using something like .toFixed(6).slice(0, -4) instead. – Bruno Lemos Apr 6 '18 at 6:03
  • that's perfect, in my case it woks ok. for example if I want to have just one decimal number use num.toFixed(2).slice(0,-1) ( if num has 1.2356, it'll return 1.2) – Esteban Perez Apr 8 '19 at 22:33
7

Simple do this

number = parseInt(number * 100)/100;
| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    parseInt(8.2*100) = 819 – VPaul May 15 '19 at 13:42
6

Another single-line solution :

number = Math.trunc(number*100)/100

I used 100 because you want to truncate to the second digit, but a more flexible solution would be :

number = Math.trunc(number*Math.pow(10, digits))/Math.pow(10, digits)

where digits is the amount of decimal digits to keep.

See Math.trunc specs for details and browser compatibility.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    This is the best answer if you do not have to support IE11. – T. Junghans Jun 26 at 14:24
5

These solutions do work, but to me seem unnecessarily complicated. I personally like to use the modulus operator to obtain the remainder of a division operation, and remove that. Assuming that num = 15.7784514:

num-=num%.01;

This is equivalent to saying num = num - (num % .01).

| improve this answer | |
  • That's interesting Nijkokun, thanks for pointing it out. I've never run into problems using this technique, but clearly I should take a closer look for instances like this. As an alternative you could use ((num*=100)-(num%1))/100 which resolves this issue. The priority in my case is execution speed because of the volume of calculations I'm applying this to, and this is the fastest way of achieving this that I've found. – jtrick Feb 5 '15 at 3:36
  • 1
    The point was to avoid the object and function lookups and conversions required in the other solutions offered. Thanks for the feedback! – jtrick Feb 5 '15 at 3:46
  • 1
    also fails with negatives as -5 – Ruslan López Jun 8 '16 at 21:40
  • I'm also interested in a fast rounding, how would you make this code do 1 decimal? – thednp Dec 2 '16 at 2:04
5

The answers here didn't help me, it kept rounding up or giving me the wrong decimal.

my solution converts your decimal to a string, extracts the characters and then returns the whole thing as a number.

function Dec2(num) {
  num = String(num);
  if(num.indexOf('.') !== -1) {
    var numarr = num.split(".");
    if (numarr.length == 1) {
      return Number(num);
    }
    else {
      return Number(numarr[0]+"."+numarr[1].charAt(0)+numarr[1].charAt(1));
    }
  }
  else {
    return Number(num);
  }  
}

Dec2(99); // 99
Dec2(99.9999999); // 99.99
Dec2(99.35154); // 99.35
Dec2(99.8); // 99.8
Dec2(10265.985475); // 10265.98
| improve this answer | |
  • Dec2(99) should return 99.00 – VPaul May 15 '19 at 13:42
5

My version for positive numbers:

function toFixed_norounding(n,p)
{
    var result = n.toFixed(p);
    return result <= n ? result: (result - Math.pow(0.1,p)).toFixed(p);
}

Fast, pretty, obvious. (version for positive numbers)

| improve this answer | |
  • needed a non-rounding for float values (e.g. money), with only 1 decimal. The above function should be the "answer" of this topic, it's excellent, works like a charm. cheers to the author & thanks. :))) – Adrian Tanase May 31 '17 at 21:35
  • Failed for negative value. -0.7752. Test it toFixed_norounding(-0.7752,2) returns -0.78 instead of -0.77 – Ling Loeng Nov 14 '18 at 17:16
4

The following code works very good for me:

num.toString().match(/.\*\\..{0,2}|.\*/)[0];
| improve this answer | |
  • I will add the optional minus sign to make it perfect -? ;) – Ruslan López Jun 8 '16 at 22:01
3

I fixed using following simple way-

var num = 15.7784514;
Math.floor(num*100)/100;

Results will be 15.77

| improve this answer | |
  • It doesn't work with negative values: -15.7784514 returns -15.78 – Clément Baconnier Dec 6 '18 at 9:41
3

Just truncate the digits:

function truncDigits(inputNumber, digits) {
  const fact = 10 ** digits;
  return Math.floor(inputNumber * fact) / fact;
}
| improve this answer | |
2

Here you are. An answer that shows yet another way to solve the problem:

// For the sake of simplicity, here is a complete function:
function truncate(numToBeTruncated, numOfDecimals) {
    var theNumber = numToBeTruncated.toString();
    var pointIndex = theNumber.indexOf('.');
    return +(theNumber.slice(0, pointIndex > -1 ? ++numOfDecimals + pointIndex : undefined));
}

Note the use of + before the final expression. That is to convert our truncated, sliced string back to number type.

Hope it helps!

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    I like the simplicity of this approach, and I feel that all the solutions that avoid using Maths, are more appropriate for solving this problem. So, the use of slice() etc, is the correct way forward. The only advantage of my method is that it will process numbers passed in that are strings [surrounded by quote marks [single/double]]. For some reason, the function above threw an error in FF, when I did: console.log('truncate("0.85156",2)',truncate("0.85156",2)); – Charles Robertson Jun 2 '17 at 21:24
2

truncate without zeroes

function toTrunc(value,n){  
    return Math.floor(value*Math.pow(10,n))/(Math.pow(10,n));
}

or

function toTrunc(value,n){
    x=(value.toString()+".0").split(".");
    return parseFloat(x[0]+"."+x[1].substr(0,n));
}

test:

toTrunc(17.4532,2)  //17.45
toTrunc(177.4532,1) //177.4
toTrunc(1.4532,1)   //1.4
toTrunc(.4,2)       //0.4

truncate with zeroes

function toTruncFixed(value,n){
    return toTrunc(value,n).toFixed(n);
}

test:

toTrunc(17.4532,2)  //17.45
toTrunc(177.4532,1) //177.4
toTrunc(1.4532,1)   //1.4
toTrunc(.4,2)       //0.40
| improve this answer | |
2

This worked well for me. I hope it will fix your issues too.

function toFixedNumber(number) {
    const spitedValues = String(number.toLocaleString()).split('.');
    let decimalValue = spitedValues.length > 1 ? spitedValues[1] : '';
    decimalValue = decimalValue.concat('00').substr(0,2);

    return '$'+spitedValues[0] + '.' + decimalValue;
}

// 5.56789      ---->  $5.56
// 0.342        ---->  $0.34
// -10.3484534  ---->  $-10.34 
// 600          ---->  $600.00

function convertNumber(){
  var result = toFixedNumber(document.getElementById("valueText").value);
  document.getElementById("resultText").value = result;
}


function toFixedNumber(number) {
        const spitedValues = String(number.toLocaleString()).split('.');
        let decimalValue = spitedValues.length > 1 ? spitedValues[1] : '';
        decimalValue = decimalValue.concat('00').substr(0,2);

        return '$'+spitedValues[0] + '.' + decimalValue;
}
<div>
  <input type="text" id="valueText" placeholder="Input value here..">
  <br>
  <button onclick="convertNumber()" >Convert</button>
  <br><hr>
  <input type="text" id="resultText" placeholder="result" readonly="true">
</div>

| improve this answer | |
2

An Easy way to do it is the next but is necessary ensure that the amount parameter is given as a string.

function truncate(amountAsString, decimals = 2){
  var dotIndex = amountAsString.indexOf('.');
  var toTruncate = dotIndex !== -1  && ( amountAsString.length > dotIndex + decimals + 1);
  var approach = Math.pow(10, decimals);
  var amountToTruncate = toTruncate ? amountAsString.slice(0, dotIndex + decimals +1) : amountAsString;  
  return toTruncate
    ?  Math.floor(parseFloat(amountToTruncate) * approach ) / approach
    :  parseFloat(amountAsString);

}

console.log(truncate("7.99999")); //OUTPUT ==> 7.99
console.log(truncate("7.99999", 3)); //OUTPUT ==> 7.999
console.log(truncate("12.799999999999999")); //OUTPUT ==> 7.99
| improve this answer | |
2

function formatLimitDecimals(value, decimals) {
  value = value.toString().split('.')

  if (value.length === 2) {
    return Number([value[0], value[1].slice(0, decimals)].join('.'))
  } else {
    return Number(value[0]);
  }
}

console.log(formatLimitDecimals(4.156, 2)); // 4.15
console.log(formatLimitDecimals(4.156, 8)); // 4.156
console.log(formatLimitDecimals(4.156, 0)); // 4

| improve this answer | |
1

I used (num-0.05).toFixed(1) to get the second decimal floored.

| improve this answer | |
1

My solution in typescript (can easily be ported to JS):

/**
 * Returns the price with correct precision as a string
 *
 * @param   price The price in decimal to be formatted.
 * @param   decimalPlaces The number of decimal places to use
 * @return  string The price in Decimal formatting.
 */
type toDecimal = (price: number, decimalPlaces?: number) => string;
const toDecimalOdds: toDecimal = (
  price: number,
  decimalPlaces: number = 2,
): string => {
  const priceString: string = price.toString();
  const pointIndex: number = priceString.indexOf('.');

  // Return the integer part if decimalPlaces is 0
  if (decimalPlaces === 0) {
    return priceString.substr(0, pointIndex);
  }

  // Return value with 0s appended after decimal if the price is an integer
  if (pointIndex === -1) {
    const padZeroString: string = '0'.repeat(decimalPlaces);

    return `${priceString}.${padZeroString}`;
  }

  // If numbers after decimal are less than decimalPlaces, append with 0s
  const padZeroLen: number = priceString.length - pointIndex - 1;
  if (padZeroLen > 0 && padZeroLen < decimalPlaces) {
    const padZeroString: string = '0'.repeat(padZeroLen);

    return `${priceString}${padZeroString}`;
  }

  return priceString.substr(0, pointIndex + decimalPlaces + 1);
};

Test cases:

  expect(filters.toDecimalOdds(3.14159)).toBe('3.14');
  expect(filters.toDecimalOdds(3.14159, 2)).toBe('3.14');
  expect(filters.toDecimalOdds(3.14159, 0)).toBe('3');
  expect(filters.toDecimalOdds(3.14159, 10)).toBe('3.1415900000');
  expect(filters.toDecimalOdds(8.2)).toBe('8.20');

Any improvements?

| improve this answer | |
0

Roll your own toFixed function: for positive values Math.floor works fine.

function toFixed(num, fixed) {
    fixed = fixed || 0;
    fixed = Math.pow(10, fixed);
    return Math.floor(num * fixed) / fixed;
}

For negative values Math.floor is round of the values. So you can use Math.ceil instead.

Example,

Math.ceil(-15.778665 * 10000) / 10000 = -15.7786
Math.floor(-15.778665 * 10000) / 10000 = -15.7787 // wrong.
| improve this answer | |
  • 5
    So many of these answers have a multiplication inside a Math.floor() function. This will fail for some numbers! Floating point arithmetic is not accurate and you need to use different methods. – Nico Westerdale Nov 4 '16 at 15:35
0

Gumbo's second solution, with the regular expression, does work but is slow because of the regular expression. Gumbo's first solution fails in certain situations due to imprecision in floating points numbers. See the JSFiddle for a demonstration and a benchmark. The second solution takes about 1636 nanoseconds per call on my current system, Intel Core i5-2500 CPU at 3.30 GHz.

The solution I've written involves adding a small compensation to take care of floating point imprecision. It is basically instantaneous, i.e. on the order of nanoseconds. I clocked 2 nanoseconds per call but the JavaScript timers are not very precise or granular. Here is the JS Fiddle and the code.

function toFixedWithoutRounding (value, precision)
{
    var factorError = Math.pow(10, 14);
    var factorTruncate = Math.pow(10, 14 - precision);
    var factorDecimal = Math.pow(10, precision);
    return Math.floor(Math.floor(value * factorError + 1) / factorTruncate) / factorDecimal;
}

var values = [1.1299999999, 1.13, 1.139999999, 1.14, 1.14000000001, 1.13 * 100];

for (var i = 0; i < values.length; i++)
{
    var value = values[i];
    console.log(value + " --> " + toFixedWithoutRounding(value, 2));
}

for (var i = 0; i < values.length; i++)
{
    var value = values[i];
    console.log(value + " --> " + toFixedWithoutRounding(value, 4));
}

console.log("type of result is " + typeof toFixedWithoutRounding(1.13 * 100 / 100, 2));

// Benchmark
var value = 1.13 * 100;
var startTime = new Date();
var numRun = 1000000;
var nanosecondsPerMilliseconds = 1000000;

for (var run = 0; run < numRun; run++)
    toFixedWithoutRounding(value, 2);

var endTime = new Date();
var timeDiffNs = nanosecondsPerMilliseconds * (endTime - startTime);
var timePerCallNs = timeDiffNs / numRun;
console.log("Time per call (nanoseconds): " + timePerCallNs);
| improve this answer | |
0

Building on David D's answer:

function NumberFormat(num,n) {
  var num = (arguments[0] != null) ? arguments[0] : 0;
  var n = (arguments[1] != null) ? arguments[1] : 2;
  if(num > 0){
    num = String(num);
    if(num.indexOf('.') !== -1) {
      var numarr = num.split(".");
      if (numarr.length > 1) {
        if(n > 0){
          var temp = numarr[0] + ".";
          for(var i = 0; i < n; i++){
            if(i < numarr[1].length){
              temp += numarr[1].charAt(i);
            }
          }
          num = Number(temp);
        }
      }
    }
  }
  return Number(num);
}

console.log('NumberFormat(123.85,2)',NumberFormat(123.85,2));
console.log('NumberFormat(123.851,2)',NumberFormat(123.851,2));
console.log('NumberFormat(0.85,2)',NumberFormat(0.85,2));
console.log('NumberFormat(0.851,2)',NumberFormat(0.851,2));
console.log('NumberFormat(0.85156,2)',NumberFormat(0.85156,2));
console.log('NumberFormat(0.85156,4)',NumberFormat(0.85156,4));
console.log('NumberFormat(0.85156,8)',NumberFormat(0.85156,8));
console.log('NumberFormat(".85156",2)',NumberFormat(".85156",2));
console.log('NumberFormat("0.85156",2)',NumberFormat("0.85156",2));
console.log('NumberFormat("1005.85156",2)',NumberFormat("1005.85156",2));
console.log('NumberFormat("0",2)',NumberFormat("0",2));
console.log('NumberFormat("",2)',NumberFormat("",2));
console.log('NumberFormat(85156,8)',NumberFormat(85156,8));
console.log('NumberFormat("85156",2)',NumberFormat("85156",2));
console.log('NumberFormat("85156.",2)',NumberFormat("85156.",2));

// NumberFormat(123.85,2) 123.85
// NumberFormat(123.851,2) 123.85
// NumberFormat(0.85,2) 0.85
// NumberFormat(0.851,2) 0.85
// NumberFormat(0.85156,2) 0.85
// NumberFormat(0.85156,4) 0.8515
// NumberFormat(0.85156,8) 0.85156
// NumberFormat(".85156",2) 0.85
// NumberFormat("0.85156",2) 0.85
// NumberFormat("1005.85156",2) 1005.85
// NumberFormat("0",2) 0
// NumberFormat("",2) 0
// NumberFormat(85156,8) 85156
// NumberFormat("85156",2) 85156
// NumberFormat("85156.",2) 85156
| improve this answer | |
0

It's more reliable to get two floating points without rounding.

Reference Answer

var number = 10.5859;
var fixed2FloatPoints = parseInt(number * 100) / 100;
console.log(fixed2FloatPoints);

Thank You !

| improve this answer | |
0

Already there are some suitable answer with regular expression and arithmetic calculation, you can also try this

function myFunction() {
    var str = 12.234556; 
    str = str.toString().split('.');
    var res = str[1].slice(0, 2);
    document.getElementById("demo").innerHTML = str[0]+'.'+res;
}

// output: 12.23
| improve this answer | |
0

Here is what is did it with string

export function withoutRange(number) {
  const str = String(number);
  const dotPosition = str.indexOf('.');
  if (dotPosition > 0) {
    const length = str.substring().length;
    const end = length > 3 ? 3 : length;
    return str.substring(0, dotPosition + end);
  }
  return str;
}
| improve this answer | |
0

All these answers seem a bit complicated. I would just subtract 0.5 from your number and use toFixed().

| improve this answer | |
0

The most efficient solution (for 2 fraction digits) is to subtract 0.005 before calling toFixed()

function toFixed2( num ) { return (num-0.005).toFixed(2) }

Negative numbers will be rounded down too (away from zero). The OP didn't tell anything about negative numbers.

| improve this answer | |
0

I know there are already few working examples, but I think it's worth to propose my String.toFixed equivalent, some may find it helpful.

That's my toFixed alternative, that don't round numbers, just truncates it or adds zeroes according to given precision. For extra long number it uses JS build-in rounding when precision is to long. Function works for all problematic number I've found on stack.

function toFixedFixed(value, precision = 0) {
    let stringValue = isNaN(+value) ? '0' : String(+value);

    if (stringValue.indexOf('e') > -1 || stringValue === 'Infinity' || stringValue === '-Infinity') {
        throw new Error('To large number to be processed');
    }

    let [ beforePoint, afterPoint ] = stringValue.indexOf('.') > -1 ? stringValue.split('.') : [ stringValue, ''];

    // Force automatic rounding for some long real numbers that ends with 99X, by converting it to string, cutting off last digit, then adding extra nines and casting it on number again
    // e.g. 2.0199999999999996: +('2.019999999999999' + '9999') will give 2.02
    if (stringValue.length >= 17 && afterPoint.length > 2 && +afterPoint.substr(afterPoint.length - 3) > 995) {
        stringValue = String(+(stringValue.substr(0, afterPoint.length - 1) + '9'.repeat(stringValue.split('.').shift().length + 4)));
        [ beforePoint, afterPoint ] = String(stringValue).indexOf('.') > -1 ? stringValue.split('.') : [ stringValue, ''];
    }

    if (precision === 0) {
        return beforePoint;
    } else if (afterPoint.length > precision) {
        return `${beforePoint}.${afterPoint.substr(0, precision)}`;
    } else {
        return `${beforePoint}.${afterPoint}${'0'.repeat(precision - afterPoint.length)}`;
    }
}

Keep in mind that precision may not be handled properly for numbers of length 18 and greater, e.g. 64-bit Chrome will round it or add "e+" / "e-" to keep number's length at 18.

If you want to perform operations on real numbers it's safer to multiply it by Math.sqrt(10, precision) first, make the calculations, then dive result by multiplier's value.

Example:

0.06 + 0.01 is 0.06999999999999999, and every formatting function that's not rounding will truncate it to 0.06 for precision 2.

But if you'll perform same operation with multiplier&divider: (0.06 * 100 + 0.01 * 100) / 100, you'll get 0.07.

That's why it's so important to use such multiplier/divider when dealing with real numbers in javascript, especially when you're calculating money...

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