1

i do not understand what difference there is between data volume and data containers... For example this two docker-compose confguration have same result but the first use a data container

whit data container

datacontainer:
 image: httpd:2.4-alpine
 volumes:
  - ../src:/usr/local/apache2/htdocs

apache:
 image: httpd:2.4-alpine
 ports:
  - 80:80
 volumes_from:
  - datacontainer

without data container

apache:
 image: httpd:2.4-alpine
 ports:
  - 80:80
 volumes:
  - ../src:/usr/local/apache2/htdocs

what are the advantages and disadvantages of using a data container?

6
  • Your first example is not how data containers are supposed to work
    – tkausl
    Jan 26 '17 at 14:42
  • 1
    what is its proper use?
    – hellb0y77
    Jan 26 '17 at 14:49
  • They are supposed to store the data in them. In your first compose yml, your apache just inherits the volume "to the outside" and stores everything on the host, as if the data container never existed.
    – tkausl
    Jan 26 '17 at 14:54
  • so I should have a datacontainer with the code inside, created earlier, every time you change the code, I re-create the data container
    – hellb0y77
    Jan 26 '17 at 15:20
  • No, your application lives in your main container. The data container is to store persistent data your application stores. Thats the whole point, so you can tear down your application, update it, start a fresh container with the updated app and the data is still in the datacontainer
    – tkausl
    Jan 26 '17 at 15:24
5

Neither one of those examples are really data volumes or data containers. They are both bind mounts to the host, one more indirectly than the other. I tend to refer to those as host volumes.

A data container is deprecated to the named volumes. They would look like:

datacontainer:
 image: httpd:2.4-alpine
 command: tail -f /dev/null
 volumes:
  - /data

apache:
 image: httpd:2.4-alpine
 ports:
  - 80:80
 volumes_from:
  - datacontainer

Then you could recreate the apache container, or upgrade it, without upgrading the datacontainer, and still have your data available. There are multiple drawbacks to this, and if implemented with the volume defined in the image I posted a blog about just how much I dislike that. But the biggest issue is that you're managing your data as a container, so any container cleanup routines will equally cleanup your data, not very good if your opposed to data loss or container sprawl.

A named volume is much easier and has all the same features of a data container, but separates the data management from the container management, allowing containers to be purged without fear, and data to be backed up from one place. They look like:

apache:
 image: httpd:2.4-alpine
 ports:
  - 80:80
 volumes:
  - data:/data

Note in version 2 of compose, you'd be more specific with the volume definition.

0

The data container pattern was designed around data persistence, though it is mostly obsoleted by named volumes in Docker 1.9. The main advantage of both volumes and the data container pattern is that bind mounting on a host is host dependent, meaning you couldn't use that in a docker file. Volumes allow you the flexibility to define volumes when you build your images.

In addition, Data volumes are designed to persist data, independent of the container’s life cycle. Docker therefore never automatically deletes volumes when you remove a container, nor will it “garbage collect” volumes that are no longer referenced by a container.

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