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I'm having a hard time understanding why the following case will leave the file "lock" present on the file system.

file script:

#!/bin/sh
set -e
run-parts sub &> /dev/null

file sub/subscript:

#!/bin/sh
set -e

# Exit if another job is running.
[ -e ./lock ] && exit 0

trap "rm -f ./lock; exit" 0 1 2 5 15

touch ./lock
echo "test"

When now running run-parts --report . in the folder where script is, why does it exit with the file lock present?

What I think it should do:

1) look for runnable scripts in the current folder (finds script)

2) it will run script and inside it will run another run-parts instance which finds the script sub/subscript and run this one

3) the file sub/subscript will create the file lock and should remove it again when signals 0, 1, 2, 5 or 15 occur.

What I found out so far:

1) Removing &> /dev/null will remove the lock file

2) Removing --report will also remove the lock file

However in my case, these two resolutions are not an option, as I am not the maintainer of the code.

From what I understand, neither of the mentioned signals will be triggered. Why is this?

OS: Debian Jessie

  • Instead of &> /dev/null, try redirecting to a file, like &> /tmp/out and see if the output contains anything useful? – Grisha Levit Jan 27 '17 at 4:38
  • Unfortunately the lockfile is still present and an empty file /tmp/out is created. – 1FpGLLjZSZMx6k Jan 27 '17 at 5:17
  • I suspect trap isn't getting called under certain circumstances. It helps if you can put an additional touch /tmp/trap.stat inside the trap code to verify if that is indeed the case. If trap calling is the issue, it could be an OS specific problem. – codeforester Feb 6 '17 at 1:19
  • I have modified the trap line from trap "rm -f ./lock; exit" 0 1 2 5 15 to trap "touch ./trapfile; rm -f ./lock; exit" 0 1 2 5 15. The specified "trapfile" is not being created when running the command (run-parts --report .) – 1FpGLLjZSZMx6k Feb 6 '17 at 14:52
  • Maybe you should handle more signals, maybe SIGPIPE (13). see man 7 signal for more signals. – user3132194 Mar 1 '17 at 9:09
0

So...

#!/bin/sh
set -e

# Exit if another job is running.
[ -e ./lock ] && exit 0

First, change #!/bin/sh to #!/bin/bash since this is a bash question. You are probably running a flavor of Linux that links /bin/sh to /bin/bash, but that's not certain. Next, if you run this, and the lock file exists, it will exit and leave the file.

trap "rm -f ./lock; exit" 0 1 2 5 15

touch ./lock
echo "test"

Then the above is ran, if lock wasn't there. You touch the file, echo test, and remove it. You've not mentioned if you've see a "test" echoed back yet. It seems to be working as intended.

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