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[UPDATE] Oracle just revised the crypto roadmap (https://www.java.com/en/jre-jdk-cryptoroadmap.html), they will not deprecate SHA-1 for codesigning: 2017-03-14 Target date changed from 2017-04-18 to 2017-07-18. Narrowed scope from all SHA-1 usage: only TLS will be affected, *code signing will not not be affected at this time*.

This does not affect, in any way, the fine answer I received below, as it will apply, no doubt, in the future.

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Original post:

Attempting to run our Webstart-deployed Java application on JRE 9 ea 153, I get the following popup:

enter image description here

Looking further at details, I see that the certificate will still be valid for a while:

enter image description here

, therefore, I am wondering if deprecating SHA1 is the reason?

This certainly does sound like a policy in line with (others' in the industry), but the message doesn't really sound neophyte-friendly (especially if it is meant to face end-users), so I am left wondering.

I looked for a roadmap. This is what I found, but I'm not sure whether I'm interpreting correctly this paragraph correctly:

Disable SHA-1 in certificate chains anchored by roots included by default in Oracle's JDK; local or enterprise CAs are not affected. Signed code that is timestamped before 2017-01-01 is not affected.

as the reason for the failure above. I would very much appreciate a confirmation.

FWIW, our certificate is issued by a CA, which I presume is different from an "enterprise" CA.

Thank you.

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    Can you try to sign it with a local cert? Just to confirm that the used CA not being an enterprise CA is the problem at work here? But i strongly suspect that your assumption is right.
    – Timmeey
    Jan 26, 2017 at 17:11
  • The certificate is issued by Comodo, if that helps. We've been using it to sign the jars for quite a while, for our users, which are not internal, but spread around the globe. Not sure whether this adds anything to the discussion, but thank you for weighing in. I'd need to look into creating a local cert, it's not something - it's not something I dabble with daily. Jan 26, 2017 at 17:17
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    Thanks for the additional Information. If that signed Jar is meant to be used by end-users there is no way a package that was SHA1 signed in 2017 is going to work. Phasing out SHA1 was announced long ago. Only way would be to install a local CA or something, but that is not going to happen on end-user machines (neither should it). For end-users you need a new valid Cert from your CA. Your cert would have expired in a few month anyway. So go poke management to authorize a new Cert and talk to change management to authorize the switching of the certs ;-)
    – Timmeey
    Jan 26, 2017 at 17:39
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    Would you mind making your comment into an answer, so I can vote it as such? Side-question, not sure if it warrants a new topic: will I need to dual-sign the jar, to support older versions of Java, when I switch to the new certificate? Jan 26, 2017 at 19:28
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    @Timmeey agreed, your comment qualifies as an answer IMO
    – Eugene
    Jan 27, 2017 at 6:48

1 Answer 1

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If that signed Jar is meant to be used by end-users there is no way a package that was SHA1 signed in 2017 is going to work.

Phasing out SHA1 was announced a long time ago. Only way would be to install a local CA or something, but that is not going to happen on end-user machines (neither should it).

To sign a Jar for your end-users you need a new valid SHA-256 Cert from your CA, and re-sign any Jar that was signed with the old one AFTER 31.12.2016. Your cert would have expired in a few month anyway.

Whether you have to dualsign your jars depends on the oldest JVM version you are targeting. As far as i understand it anything >=1.4.2 supports SHA-256. If you want to target even older Versions (hell when i started programming java 1.5 was already considered OLD) you would need something like dual-signing. More Information can be found here and here

"How to dual sign a jar" is probably a new topic because it is hardly related to this question i think.

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  • Thanks for the extra details. They also confirmed that I don't need bother dual-signing, as I'm targeting Java 6+. Jan 27, 2017 at 14:26

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