2

In Perl, what's the best way to turn this string:

7705554200-4299

into

7705554200-7705554299

I know how to grab the first 6 digits but not sure how to insert them after the hyphen.

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

my $num = '7705554200-4299';

# Check to see number is a range
if ($num =~ /-/)
{
  # Pull area code and exchange
  my $extract = substr($num, 0, 6);
  print "Area code + exchange: $extract\n";
}
3

Figured it out

#!/usr/bin/perl

my $num = '7704814200-4299';

# Check to see if it is a range
if ($num =~ /-/)
{
  # Pull area code and exchange
  my $extract = substr($num, 0, 6);
  print "Extracted this: $extract\n";

  $num =~ s/-/-$extract/;
  print $num;

}
  • While you can do this in a regex, you found a solution that allowed you to print out debug information and is probably easier to maintain. Congrats! Not every solution should be done with a regex! (Sometimes it's unavoidable, but not this time.) – Tanktalus Jan 26 '17 at 21:50
  • To support comment by Tanktalus (beat me to it), this is a nice solution. Crystal clear and nicely maintable. Most of the time there are alternatives to complex regex and they are usually better code. – zdim Jan 26 '17 at 22:46
  • Regex here isn't all that hard (I still prefer what you did), and for your reference: $num =~ s/(\d{6})\d*-\K/$1/. The only trick is \K, a particular form of the postive lookbehind. These patterns only assert that something is there, without consuming it. The \K also 'frees' everything matched before it so that the substitution won't touch it. So we don't have to retype it. See this in perlretut – zdim Jan 26 '17 at 22:48
  • In fact \K is in Extended Patterns in perlre, under "Lookaround assertions" – zdim Jan 26 '17 at 22:57
1

Since you don't really need the full power of regular expression pattern matching, you can use index and the fourth parameter of substr to insert some characters immediately after the hyphen:

use strict;
use warnings;

my $num = '7705554200-4299';
substr($num, index($num, '-') + 1, 0, substr($num, 0, 6));
print "$num\n";

You can also use substr as an lvalue, but personally, I find that version to be more obtuse:

substr($num, index($num, '-') + 1, 0) = substr($num, 0, 6);

Result:

7705554200-7705554299

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