1

i have the following scenario:

interface ValueBinding<T> {
    public void setValue(T input);
}

public enum FacesBinding {
    VALUE;
    public void bindString(ValueBinding<String> fcn, HttpServletRequest req, String param){
        try {
            String val = req.getParameter(param);
            if( val != null )
                fcn.setValue(val);
        } catch (Exception e) { }        
    }
    public void bindBoolean(ValueBinding<Boolean> fcn, HttpServletRequest req, String param){
        try {
            fcn.setValue(req.getParameter(param) != null);
        } catch (Exception e) { }        
    }
    public void bindInt(ValueBinding<Integer> fcn, HttpServletRequest req, String param){
        try {
            int val = Integer.parseInt(req.getParameter(param));
            fcn.setValue(val);
        } catch (Exception e) { }        
    }
    public void bindLong(ValueBinding<Long> fcn, HttpServletRequest req, String param){
        try {
            long val = Long.parseLong(req.getParameter(param));
            fcn.setValue(val);
        } catch (Exception e) { }        
    }
...
...
}

and i use it in a "multithreaded" Environment like this:

concurrent Threads are calling this method

            @Override // concurrent Threads are calling this method
            public Category initData(FacesContext facesContext) throws Exception {
                Category entity = new Category();
                HttpServletRequest req = facesContext.getRequest();
                FacesBinding.VALUE.bindLong(entity::setId, req, Table.Category.Field.ID.name());
                FacesBinding.VALUE.bindString(entity::setName, req, Table.Category.Field.NAME.name());

                FacesBinding.VALUE.bindInt(entity::setPosition, req, Table.Category.Field.POSITION.name());
                FacesBinding.VALUE.bindBoolean(entity::setLocalized, req, Table.Category.Field.LOCALIZED.name());           
                return entity;
            }

is

FacesBinding.VALUE.bindLong(entity::setId, req, Table.Category.Field.ID.name());

100% Thread safe when i pass a method reference(interface) entity::setId as parameter of a method in enum Object (Singleton)?

NOTE:

entity::setId

entity::setName

entity::setPosition

...etc. ALL these methods are standard java setter methods

public void setId(long id) {
        this.id = id;
    }
public void setName(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }
....

UPDATE:

to be concrete: ARE

Category entity = new Category();
entity.setId(5);//thread safe for sure

100% equal to

FacesBinding.VALUE.bindLong(entity::setId, ...);

does the fact that FacesBinding ist Singleton and the method Reference in bindLong(entity::setId, ...) makes it thread-unsafe??

2
  • I don't see what could render this thread safe. But this deserve some research
    – AxelH
    Jan 27, 2017 at 14:59
  • @AxelH, isn't the fact that the method bindLong(entity::setId, ...) takes a method of a new Instance of the Object (new Category() in my case) makes it thread safe?
    – Rami.Q
    Jan 27, 2017 at 15:04

1 Answer 1

2

Your method reference call will be thread-safe if your setId method is thread-safe, nothing more and nothing less.

Method reference is a fancy shorthand for creating your ValueBinding objects. When they are compiled, there will be a private inner class of sorts that implements your functional interface and calls the method you specified. Since you specified method that belongs to an object, this inner class will also be equivalent to having constructor that accepts your Category object, and a private field to store it (I said equivalent to because by default implementations are not limited to this behavior if they can justify and choose any other).

10
  • setId method is a usual java setter method, since it belongs to a particular instance of the Category Object, is thread safe. does this mean that my implementation above 100% thread safe despite the fact that i use it as methode reference in Singleton object (enum)?
    – Rami.Q
    Jan 27, 2017 at 15:27
  • 1
    I would say that having it as a simple setter will rather make it not thread safe, because by thread safety you usually mean ordered writes, and since there is no synchronization in place neither on "ValueBinding" nor on "setId", and with added fact that any of your ValueBinding objects can be shared by several concurrent threads at discretion of its use-site. Jan 27, 2017 at 15:41
  • in my case the concurrent Threads are calling the initData(..) method. as you see inside this methode, i create a new instance of my Category Object. No thread has any direct access to the setter methods. every call of initData(..) become a new Instance. this is why i said its thread safe. But i am not sure if this the case by using method references in an enum Object. here are my worries.
    – Rami.Q
    Jan 27, 2017 at 15:57
  • 1
    In your particular situation, you indeed may consider your initData(FC) method to be thread safe, since it does not (as far as I can tell) use any values that another thread may also use. In terms of functions, your initData can be considered "pure" since it only depends on its input and not on some outside mutable state. However, I will still stand by my initial judgements: entity::getId is not thread-safe itself. It is just used in a thread-safe manner (i.e. there are no cases where several threads can access the same instance of entity::getId). Jan 27, 2017 at 16:03
  • 1
    Just a side note about Method References in Java 8, they are utilized as a functional interface, but they don't compile down to a private inner class. They compile down to an opcode that was added in Java 7 called invokedynamic that initially bootstraps and creates a dynamic linkage between the call and the code that is to be executed. After that initial call, the opcode is then read as invokestatic, so it is extremely efficient.
    – CraigR8806
    Jan 27, 2017 at 16:47

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.