26

This should be simple, but I'm just not seeing it.

If I have a process ID, how can I use that to grab info about the process such as the process name.

20

Under Linux, you can read proc filesystem. File /proc/<pid>/cmdline contains the commandline.

  • 6
    An alternative is ps -o cmd= <pid>. – Ricardo Stuven Jan 16 '13 at 17:05
  • 7
    And /proc/<pid>/comm actually gives the process name. – Skippy le Grand Gourou Jul 5 '13 at 15:01
14

Try PSUtil -> https://github.com/giampaolo/psutil

Works fine on Windows and Unix, I recall.

  • That seems like the right thing to do. It bugs me that it's not in debian 5 however. – andyortlieb Nov 16 '10 at 14:08
  • 2
    That's a (common) problem with debian, not with psutil ;) – Paweł Polewicz Jun 23 '11 at 22:01
  • 1
    you can just "python setup.py install" to install it from sources. – Giampaolo Rodolà Aug 4 '11 at 11:17
  • I agree with you both, and it's something I would have done if it were on a particular server, but it's for an application that we're distributing that still only supports debian 5 at this time ;) . Reading /proc will just be easier and more reliable for us to manage in the long run. – andyortlieb Oct 27 '11 at 22:11
  • I am using p.name() which is truncating the output. Is there any other way to get the complete process name?? – Ravi Shanker Reddy Aug 30 '17 at 0:03
1

For Windows

A Way to get all the pids of programs on your computer without downloading any modules:

import os

pids = []
a = os.popen("tasklist").readlines()
for x in a:
      try:
         pids.append(int(x[29:34]))
      except:
           pass
for each in pids:
         print(each)

If you just wanted one program or all programs with the same name and you wanted to kill the process or something:

import os, sys, win32api

tasklistrl = os.popen("tasklist").readlines()
tasklistr = os.popen("tasklist").read()

print(tasklistr)

def kill(process):
     process_exists_forsure = False
     gotpid = False
     for examine in tasklistrl:
            if process == examine[0:len(process)]:
                process_exists_forsure = True
     if process_exists_forsure:
         print("That process exists.")
     else:
        print("That process does not exist.")
        raw_input()
        sys.exit()
     for getpid in tasklistrl:
         if process == getpid[0:len(process)]:
                pid = int(getpid[29:34])
                gotpid = True
                try:
                  handle = win32api.OpenProcess(1, False, pid)
                  win32api.TerminateProcess(handle, 0)
                  win32api.CloseHandle(handle)
                  print("Successfully killed process %s on pid %d." % (getpid[0:len(prompt)], pid))
                except win32api.error as err:
                  print(err)
                  raw_input()
                  sys.exit()
    if not gotpid:
       print("Could not get process pid.")
       raw_input()
       sys.exit()

   raw_input()
   sys.exit()

prompt = raw_input("Which process would you like to kill? ")
kill(prompt)

That was just a paste of my process kill program I could make it a whole lot better but it is okay.

1

Using psutil, here is the simplest code i can give you:

import psutil

# The PID ID of the process needed
pid_id = 1216

# Informations of the Process with the PID ID
process_pid = psutil.Process(pid_id)
print(process_pid)
# Gives You PID ID, name and started date
# psutil.Process(pid=1216, name='ATKOSD2.exe', started='21:38:05')

# Name of the process
process_name = process_pid.name()
0

Try this

def filter_non_printable(str):
    ret=""
    for c in str:
        if ord(c) > 31 or ord(c) == 9:
            ret += c
        else:
            ret += " "
    return ret

#
# Get /proc/<cpu>/cmdline information
#
def pid_name(self, pid):
    try:
        with open(os.path.join('/proc/', pid, 'cmdline'), 'r') as pidfile:
            return filter_non_printable(pidfile.readline())

    except Exception:
        pass
        return

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