38

I wondering if something similar to this is possible. Basically, I have a templated class that occasionally takes objects of templated classes. I would like to specialize it (or just a member function)for a specific templated class, but the 'generic' form of that class.

template<typename T, typename S>
class SomeRandomClass
{
    //put something here
};

template<typename T>
class MyTemplateClass
{
    void DoSomething(T & t) {
       //...something
    }
};

template<>
void MyTemplateClass< SomeRandomClass<???> >::DoSomething(SomeRandomClass<???> & t)
{
    //something specialized happens here
}

Replacing the question marks with appropriate types (double, etc) works, but I would like it to remain generic. I don't know what to put there, as any types wouldn't have been defined. I've looked around, and learned about template template parameters, and tried various combinations to no avail. Thanks for the help!

23

It's possible to specialize the class like this

template <>
template <typename T,typename S>
class MyTemplateClass <SomeRandomClass<T,S> >
{
    void DoSomething(SomeRandomClass<T,S>& t) { /* something */ }
};

It's not possible to specialize just the member method, because the specialization is on the class as a whole, and you have to define a new class. You can, however, do

template <>
template <typename T,typename S>
class MyTemplateClass <SomeRandomClass<T,S> >
{
    void DoSomething(SomeRandomClass<T,S>& t);
};

template <>
template <typename T,typename S>
void MyTemplateClass<SomeRandomClass<T,S> >::DoSomething(SomeRandomClass<T,S>& t)
{
    // something
}

to split up the declaration and definition.

  • Can you specialize a templated function the same way? – Mirco Feb 13 '18 at 23:13
  • @Mirco just a bare function, not a part of a class? You don't actually need the initial empty template<> for that case, since you don't have a containing template class to specialize. – Ryan Calhoun Feb 14 '18 at 0:30
  • Let say that I have a prototype template <typename T> T fun(void); and I want to specialize it for all, say, std::list types. Can I obtain something like template<> template<typename S> std::list<S> fun<std::list<S>>(void) { /*return sth*/ };? – Mirco Feb 14 '18 at 9:48
  • Specializing only on the return type? I don't know for sure if a partial specialization like that is even allowed. But that would make a good question to post and get an answer. – Ryan Calhoun Feb 14 '18 at 13:05
19

I'm not completely sure why @Ryan Calhoun specialized the way he did but here's a more terse example:

// class we want to specialize with later on
template<typename T, typename S>
struct SomeRandomClass
{
    int myInt = 0;
};

// non-specialized class
template<typename T>
struct MyTemplateClass
{
    void DoSomething(T & t) 
    {
       std::cout << "Not specialized" << std::endl;
    }
};

// specialized class
template<typename T, typename S>
struct MyTemplateClass< SomeRandomClass<T, S> >
{
    void DoSomething(SomeRandomClass<T,S> & t) 
    {
       std::cout << "Specialized" << std::endl;
    }
};

You can see that you don't need the redundant syntax used in the accepted answer:

template<>
template<typename T, typename S>

Working Demo


Alternative

You can use type_traits and tag-dispatch within your non-specialized class to specialize just the function.

Let's first make a concept for is_random_class:

// concept to test for whether some type is SomeRandomClass<T,S>
template<typename T>
struct is_random_class : std::false_type{};

template<typename T, typename S>
struct is_random_class<SomeRandomClass<T,S>> : std::true_type{};

And then let's declare our MyTemplateClass again, but this time not templated (because we're not specializing) so we'll call it MyNonTemplatedClass:

class MyNonTemplatedClass
{

    public:
    template<typename T>
    void DoSomething(T & t) 
    {
       DoSomethingHelper(t, typename is_random_class<T>::type());
    }
    // ...

Notice how DoSomething is now templated, and it's actually calling a helper instead of implementing the logic itself?

Let's break down the line:

DoSomethingHelper(t, typename is_random_class<T>::type());
  • t is as-before; we're passing along the argument of type T&
  • typename is_random_class<T>::type()
    • is_random_class<T> is our concept, and since it derives from std::true_type or std::false_type it will have a ::type defined within the class (Google for "type traits")
    • ::type() 'instantiates' the type specified by is_random_class<T>::type. I say it in quotation marks because we're really going to throw that away as we see later
    • typename is required because the compiler doesn't know that is_random_clas<T>::type actually names a type.

Now we're ready to look at the rest of MyNonTemplatedClass:

    private:
    //use tag dispatch. If the compiler is smart it won't actually try to instantiate the second param
    template<typename T>
    void DoSomethingHelper(T&t, std::true_type)
    {
        std::cout << "Called DoSomething with SomeRandomClass whose myInt member has value " << t.myInt << std::endl;
    }

    template<typename T>
    void DoSomethingHelper(T&t, std::false_type)
    {
        std::cout << "Called DoSomething with a type that is not SomeRandomClass\n";
    }
};

Full Working Demo v2 Here

Notice that our helper functions are named the same, but overloaded on the second parameter's type. We don't give a name to the parameter because we don't need it, and hopefully the compiler will optimize it away while still calling the proper function.

Our concept forces DoSomethingHelper(T&t, std::true_type) only if T is of type SomeRandomClass, and calls the other for any other type.

The benefit of tag dispatch

The main benefit of tag dispatch here is that you don't need to specialize your entire class if you only mean to specialize a single function within that class.

The tag dispatching will happen at compile time, which you wouldn't get if you tried to perform branching on the concept solely within the DoSomething function.


C++17

In C++17, this problem becomes embarrassingly easy using variable templates (C++14) and if constexpr (C++17).

We use our type_trait to create a variable template that will give us a bool value of true if the provided type T is of type SomeRandomClass, and false otherwise:

template<class T>
constexpr bool is_random_class_v = is_random_class<T>::value;

Then, we use it in a if constexpr expression that only compiles the appropriate branch (and discards the other at compile-time, so the check is at compile-time, not run-time):

struct MyNonTemplatedClass
{
    template<class T>
    void DoSomething(T& t) 
    {
        if constexpr(is_random_class_v<T>)
            std::cout << "Called DoSomething with SomeRandomClass whose myInt member has value " << t.myInt << std::endl;
        else
            std::cout << "Called DoSomething with a type that is not SomeRandomClass\n";
    }
};

type-traits were a way to simulate this without needing a class specialization.

Note that is_random_class here is a stand-in for an arbitrary constraint. In general, if you're only checking for a single nontemplated type, prefer a normal overload because it's more efficient on the compiler.

Demo


C++20

In C++20, we can take this a step further and use a constraint instead of if constexpr by using a requires clause on our templated member function. The downside is that we again move back to two functions; one that matches the constraint, and another that doesn't:

struct MyNonTemplatedClass
{
    template<class T>  requires is_random_class_v<T>
    void DoSomething(T& t)
    {
        std::cout << "Called DoSomething with SomeRandomClass whose myInt member has value " << t.myInt << std::endl;
    }

    template<class T> requires !is_random_class_v<T>
    void DoSomething(T&) 
    {
        std::cout << "Called DoSomething with a type that is not SomeRandomClass\n";
    }
};

Demo

  • 2
    If in 2010 you wanted your code to compile with gcc on rhel4 and rhel5, and with visual studio 2008 on windows xp, this is the way you would have written it too. – Ryan Calhoun Jan 25 '17 at 15:23
10

All you need to do is just template on what you want to keep generic. Taking what you started with:

template<typename T, typename S>
void MyTemplateClass< SomeRandomClass<T,S> >::DoSomething(SomeRandomClass<T,S> & t)
{
    //something specialized happens here
}

EDIT:

Alternatively, if you only want to keep part of the SomeRandomClass generic, you could:

template<typename T>
void MyTemplateClass< SomeRandomClass<T,int> >::DoSomething(SomeRandomClass<T,int> & t)
{
    //something specialized happens here
}
  • 2
    Those I think that's almost it, however I can't get it to compile (with g++ or intel). I think putting the template<typename T> there confuses the compiler into not recognizing that as a specialization (ie there needs to be a template<> , correct?) – Benjamin Pritchard Nov 16 '10 at 1:43
0

Edit: this is a correct answer to a different question.

Using the typename T twice confuses the issue a little, because they are compiled separately and are not connected in any way.

You can overload the method to take a templated parameter:

template <typename T>
class MyTemplateClass
{
    void DoSomething(T& t) { }

    template <typename U,typename V>
    void DoSomething(SomeRandomClass<<U,V>& r) { }
};

This maps U and V in the new method to T' and S' in SomeRandomClass. In this setup, either U or V could be the same type as T, but they don't have to be. Depending on your compiler, you ought to be able to do

MyTemplateClass<string> mine;
SomeRandomClass<int,double> random;

// note: nevermind the non-const ref on the string literal here...
mine.DoSomething("hello world");
mine.DoSomething(random);

and the templated call will be selected as the matching overload without having to respecify the types explicitly.

Edit:

To do with with template specialization makes no difference to the overload of DoSomething. If you specialize the class as follows

template <>
class SomeRandomClass <int,double>
{
    // something here...
};

then the overload above will eat up this specialized implementation gladly. Just be sure the interfaces of the specialized template and the default template match.

If what you're wanting is to specialize DoSomething to take a specific pair of types for SomeRandomClass then you've already lost generality...that's what specialization is.

  • That's not quite it. That looks like it's just overloading of the DoSomething member, rather than a specialization of the class itself. – Benjamin Pritchard Nov 16 '10 at 1:42
  • You're right, but it makes no difference to the method overload whether you're passing a specialized class or a regular template. – Ryan Calhoun Nov 16 '10 at 3:51
  • I finally see now what you were asking. This answer was totally backward. – Ryan Calhoun Nov 17 '10 at 0:19

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.