3

This question is a bit long due the source code, which I tried to simplify as much as possible. Please bear with me and thanks for reading along.

I have an application with a loop that runs potentially millions of times. Instead of several thousands to millions of malloc/free calls within that loop, I would like to do one malloc up front and then several thousands to millions of realloc calls.

But I'm running into a problem where my application consumes several GB of memory and kills itself, when I am using realloc. If I use malloc, my memory usage is fine.

If I run on smaller test data sets with valgrind's memtest, it reports no memory leaks with either malloc or realloc.

I have verified that I am matching every malloc-ed (and then realloc-ed) object with a corresponding free.

So, in theory, I am not leaking memory, it is just that using realloc seems to consume all of my available RAM, and I'd like to know why and what I can do to fix this.

What I have initially is something like this, which uses malloc and works properly:

Malloc code

void A () {
    do {
        B();
    } while (someConditionThatIsTrueForMillionInstances);
}

void B () {
    char *firstString = NULL;
    char *secondString = NULL;
    char *someOtherString;

    /* populate someOtherString with data from stream, for example */

    C((const char *)someOtherString, &firstString, &secondString);

    fprintf(stderr, "first: [%s] | second: [%s]\n", firstString, secondString);

    if (firstString)
        free(firstString);
    if (secondString)
        free(secondString);
}

void C (const char *someOtherString, char **firstString, char **secondString) {
    char firstBuffer[BUFLENGTH];
    char secondBuffer[BUFLENGTH];

    /* populate buffers with some data from tokenizing someOtherString in a special way */

    *firstString = malloc(strlen(firstBuffer)+1);
    strncpy(*firstString, firstBuffer, strlen(firstBuffer)+1);

    *secondString = malloc(strlen(secondBuffer)+1);
    strncpy(*secondString, secondBuffer, strlen(secondBuffer)+1);
}

This works fine. But I want something faster.

Now I test a realloc arrangement, which malloc-s only once:

Realloc code

void A () {
    char *firstString = NULL;
    char *secondString = NULL;

    do {
        B(&firstString, &secondString);
    } while (someConditionThatIsTrueForMillionInstances);

    if (firstString)
        free(firstString);
    if (secondString)
        free(secondString);
}

void B (char **firstString, char **secondString) {
    char *someOtherString;

    /* populate someOtherString with data from stream, for example */

    C((const char *)someOtherString, &(*firstString), &(*secondString));

    fprintf(stderr, "first: [%s] | second: [%s]\n", *firstString, *secondString);
}

void C (const char *someOtherString, char **firstString, char **secondString) {
    char firstBuffer[BUFLENGTH];
    char secondBuffer[BUFLENGTH];

    /* populate buffers with some data from tokenizing someOtherString in a special way */

    /* realloc should act as malloc on first pass through */

    *firstString = realloc(*firstString, strlen(firstBuffer)+1);
    strncpy(*firstString, firstBuffer, strlen(firstBuffer)+1);

    *secondString = realloc(*secondString, strlen(secondBuffer)+1);
    strncpy(*secondString, secondBuffer, strlen(secondBuffer)+1);
}

If I look at the output of free -m on the command-line while I run this realloc-based test with a large data set that causes the million-loop condition, my memory goes from 4 GB down to 0 and the app crashes.

What am I missing about using realloc that is causing this? Sorry if this is a dumb question, and thanks in advance for your advice.

2
  • Can you show the output from strace too perhaps? It'd be enlightening to know what syscalls realloc vs malloc/free get mapped onto. – Flexo Nov 15 '10 at 23:57
  • You might want to look into a custom allocation function that basically gets a huge chunk via malloc() and manages it as a custom heap space. This is kind of old school but if you know what you are doing it can work very well. – user439793 Nov 16 '10 at 4:00
8

realloc has to copy the contents from the old buffer to the new buffer if the resizing operation cannot be done in place. A malloc/free pair can be better than a realloc if you don't need to keep around the original memory.

That's why realloc can temporarily require more memory than a malloc/free pair. You are also encouraging fragmentation by continuously interleaving reallocs. I.e., you are basically doing:

malloc(A);
malloc(B);

while (...)
{
    malloc(A_temp);
    free(A);
    A= A_temp;
    malloc(B_temp);
    free(B);
    B= B_temp;
}

Whereas the original code does:

while (...)
{
    malloc(A);
    malloc(B);
    free(A);
    free(B);
}

At the end of each of the second loop you have cleaned up all the memory you used; that's more likely to return the global memory heap to a clean state than by interleaving memory allocations without completely freeing all of them.

5
  • Is there a way I can periodically refresh a fragmented heap, say every x number of iterations? – Alex Reynolds Nov 16 '10 at 0:04
  • @Alex, It depends on the actual allocator. Note that my fragmentation idea isn't really precise; it really depends on the underlying implementation. If you are using Windows, you can try using HeapCompact on the global heap, but that's not really guaranteed to do anything. – MSN Nov 16 '10 at 0:22
  • Hmm, this whole fragmentation thing seems to contradict what I've heard and read about how realloc is recommended to be used, where there are lots of expensive malloc/free calls. Perhaps I should look into a fixed-size buffer on the stack. :( – Alex Reynolds Nov 16 '10 at 1:27
  • 1
    @Alex: Keep track of the current allocation sizes of firstString and secondString. Only bother to realloc them if they need to grow, and quantize the size of them (eg. make them the next-biggest-power-of-two above the size you need). – caf Nov 16 '10 at 3:24
  • @Alex, again, the fragmentation idea isn't that precise; it really depends on the allocator. With a very simple stack based allocator (i.e., it only reclaims memory that is contiguous and ends with the allocated region), you can get pathologically bad allocation behavior with a realloc based strategy. On a different allocator tuned to general patterns, you may not. It really depends on the allocator. But realloc in general will in the worst case require the old size plus new size to be available. – MSN Nov 16 '10 at 21:27
1

Using realloc when you don't want to preserve the existing contents of the memory block is a very very bad idea. If nothing else, you'll waste lots of time duplicating data you're about to overwrite. In practice, the way you're using it, the resized blocks will not fit in the old space, so they get located at progressively higher and higher addresses on the heap, causing the heap to grow ridiculously.

Memory management is not easy. Bad allocation strategies lead to fragmentation, atrocious performance, etc. The best you can do is avoid introducing any more constraints than you absolutely have to (like using realloc when it's not needed), free as much memory as possible when you're done with it, and allocate large blocks of associated data together in a single allocation rather than in small pieces.

0

You are expecting &(*firstString) to be the same as firstString, but in fact it is taking the address of the argument to your function rather than passing through the address of the pointers in A. Thus every time you call you make a copy of NULL, realloc new memory, lose the pointer to the new memory, and repeat. You can easily verify this by seeing that at the end of A the original pointers are still null.

EDIT: Well, it's an awesome theory, but I seem to be wrong on the compilers I have available to me to test.

4
  • I'm not sure I understand. The fprintf statement in B does not show NULL for the values of the two strings, i.e. the tokenization and strncpy is successful. – Alex Reynolds Nov 16 '10 at 0:06
  • Sorry, where I said B I meant A (in version 2); I scrolled back too far in the question when I was getting the function name. – Ben Jackson Nov 16 '10 at 0:08
  • If I use small datasets, the realloc app (version 2) works, i.e. I do not see NULL for the firstString and secondString values, as the copy event was successful. – Alex Reynolds Nov 16 '10 at 0:10
  • 2
    &*first_string is the same as first_string. I would be infinitely surprised if it weren't. – MSN Nov 16 '10 at 0:33

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