1

I'm trying to understand how sbrk works.

Here is my little code:

int  main()
{  
    printf("end of the break : %p\n", sbrk(0));
    printf("end of the break : %p\n", sbrk(10));
    printf("new end of the break : %p\n\n", sbrk(0));
}

This outputs:

end of break : 0xaa6000    
end of break : 0xac7000    
new end of the break : 0xac700a    

Why is the difference between the first 2 addresses 0xac7000 - 0xaa6000 = 21000 and not 10?

8

sbrk(n) increments the break by n and returns the old value of the break.

Thus:

    printf("end of the break : %p\n", sbrk(0));

Output: end of the break : 0xaa6000

Initially, the break is 0xaa6000 and the sbrk call doesn't change it.

    printf("end of the break : %p\n", sbrk(10));

Output: end of the break : 0xac7000

This is the value you're asking about. Above I said sbrk(0) wouldn't change the break, so why do we get a different value here?

The only thing that's happened in between the two sbrk call is the call to the first printf. Presumably the internals of your stdio implementation use malloc (e.g. to create buffers), which in turn calls sbrk itself. In other words, printf calls malloc internally, which reserves memory using sbrk.

    printf("new end of the break : %p\n\n", sbrk(0));

Output: new end of the break : 0xac700a

This time we see an increment of 0xa, which matches your previous sbrk(10) call exactly. Apparently this time printf didn't need to allocate dynamic memory (or if it did, malloc was able to do everything within the space it got from the first sbrk, so it didn't have to request more from the OS).

  • Okey thanks it was just because of printf. Thanks for your answer ! – Myranova Jan 28 '17 at 19:30

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.