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I am having difficulty grasping the essence of the setDT() function. As I read code on SO, I frequently come across the use of setDT() to create a data.table. Of course the use of data.table() is ubiquitous. I feel like I solidly comprehend the nature of data.table() yet the relevance of setDT() eludes me. ?setDT tells me this:

setDT converts lists (both named and unnamed) and data.frames to data.tables by reference.

as well as:

In data.table parlance, all set* functions change their input by reference. That is, no copy is made at all, other than temporary working memory, which is as large as one column.

So this makes me think I should only use setDT() to make a data.table, right? Is setDT() simply a list to data.table converter?

library(data.table)

a <- letters[c(19,20,1,3,11,15,22,5,18,6,12,15,23)]
b <- seq(1,41,pi)
ab <- data.frame(a,b)
d <- data.table(ab)
e <- setDT(ab)

str(d)
#Classes ‘data.table’ and 'data.frame': 13 obs. of  2 variables:
# $ a: Factor w/ 12 levels "a","c","e","f",..: 9 10 1 2 5 7 11 3 8 4 ...
# $ b: num  1 4.14 7.28 10.42 13.57 ...
# - attr(*, ".internal.selfref")=<externalptr>

str(e)
#Classes ‘data.table’ and 'data.frame': 13 obs. of  2 variables:
# $ a: Factor w/ 12 levels "a","c","e","f",..: 9 10 1 2 5 7 11 3 8 4 ...
# $ b: num  1 4.14 7.28 10.42 13.57 ...
# - attr(*, ".internal.selfref")=<externalptr>

Seemingly no difference in this instance. In another instance the difference is evident:

ba <- list(a,b)
f <- data.table(ba)
g <- setDT(ba)

str(f)
#Classes ‘data.table’ and 'data.frame': 2 obs. of  1 variable:
# $ ba:List of 2
#  ..$ : chr  "s" "t" "a" "c" ...
#  ..$ : num  1 4.14 7.28 10.42 13.57 ...
# - attr(*, ".internal.selfref")=<externalptr>

str(g)
#Classes ‘data.table’ and 'data.frame': 13 obs. of  2 variables:
# $ V1: chr  "s" "t" "a" "c" ...
# $ V2: num  1 4.14 7.28 10.42 13.57 ...
# - attr(*, ".internal.selfref")=<externalptr>

When should I use setDT()? What makes setDT() relevant? Why not just make the original data.table() function capable of doing what setDT() is able to do?

  • 11
    If the data already exists in a data.frame and you're happy to convert that data.frame (or list) to data.table in place, then use setDT(). If you want to construct a data.table from vectors or something, use data.table(). You should never be doing x <- setDT(y) -- I think you are misunderstanding what it means for the object to be modified by reference. Might want to have a run through the vignettes: r-datatable.com/Getting-Started – Frank Jan 29 '17 at 5:39
  • 5
    And, see what happens to the ab data.table after assigning new columns to d and e: d[, newCol := 1]; ab; e[, newCol := 1]; ab. – SymbolixAU Jan 29 '17 at 5:41
  • 2
    @Frank I will jump back in the literature. As you may know, it takes many iterations for things to click for some folks-- like myself. Thanks for pointing me in the right direction. – Dodge Jan 29 '17 at 5:50
  • @SymbolixAU Whoa! That's crazy... they have become connected. ab updates with changes to e from the use of setDT(). Weird! Now I get to spend the next few days trying to wrap my head around that. – Dodge Jan 29 '17 at 6:06
  • 5
    That's why it's important to understand what "update-by-reference" (i.e., setDT()) does, when compared to taking a copy (i.e. data.table()) of an object. – SymbolixAU Jan 29 '17 at 6:10
32
+50

Update:

@Roland makes some good points in the comments section, and the post is better for them. While I originally focused on memory overflow issues, he pointed out that even if this doesn't happen, memory management of various copies takes substantial time, which is a more common everyday concern. Examples of both issues have now been added as well.

I like this question on stackoverflow because I think it is really about avoiding stack overflow in R when dealing with larger data sets. 😊 Those who are unfamiliar with data.table family of set operations may benefit from this discussion!

One should use setDT() when working with larger data sets that take up a considerable amount of RAM because the operation will modify each object in place, conserving memory. For data that is a very small percentage of RAM, using data.table’s copy-and-modify is fine.

The creation of the setDT function was actually inspired by the following thread on stack overflow, which is about working with a large data set (several GB's). You will see Matt Dowle chime in an suggest the 'setDT' name.

Convert a data frame to a data.table without copy

A bit more depth:

With R, data is stored in memory. This speeds things up considerably because RAM is much faster to access than storage devices. However, a problem can arise when one’s data set is a large portion of RAM. Why? Because base R has a tendency to make copies of each data.frame when some operations are applied to them. This has improved after version 3.1, but addressing that is beyond the scope of this post. If one is pulling multiple data.frames or lists into one data.frame or data.table, your memory usage will expand rather quickly because at some point during the operation, multiple copies of your data exist in RAM. If the data set is big enough, you may run out of memory when all the copies are produced, and your stack will overflow. See example of this below. We get an error, and original memory address and class of object does not change.

> N <- 1e8
> P <- 1e2
> data <- as.data.frame(rep(data.frame(rnorm(N)), P))
> 
> pryr::object_size(data)
800 MB
> 
> tracemem(data)
[1] "<0000000006D2DF18>"
> 
> data <- data.table(data)
Error: cannot allocate vector of size 762.9 Mb
> 
> tracemem(data)
[1] "<0000000006D2DF18>"
> class(data)
[1] "data.frame"
>

The ability to just modify the object in place without copying is a big deal. That is what setDT does when it takes a list or data.frame and returns a data.table. The same example as above using setDT, now works fine and without error. Both class and memory address change, and no copies take place.

> tracemem(data)
[1] "<0000000006D2DF18>"
> class(data)
[1] "data.frame"
> 
> setDT(data)
>  
> tracemem(data)
[1] "<0000000006A8C758>"
> class(data)
[1] "data.table" "data.frame"

@Roland points out that for most people, the bigger concern is speed, which suffers as a side effect of such intensive use of memory management. Here is an example with smaller data that does not crash the cpu, and illustrates how much faster setDT is for this job. Notice the results of 'tracemem' in the wake of data <- data.table(data), making copies of data. Contrast that with setDT(data) which doesn't print a single copy. We have to then call tracemem(data) to see the new memory address.

> N <- 1e5
> P <- 1e2
> data <- as.data.frame(rep(data.frame(rnorm(N)), P))
> pryr::object_size(data)
808 kB

> # data.table method
> tracemem(data)
[1] "<0000000019098438>"
> data <- data.table(data)
tracemem[0x0000000019098438 -> 0x0000000007aad7d8]: data.table 
tracemem[0x0000000007aad7d8 -> 0x0000000007c518b8]: copy as.data.table.data.frame as.data.table data.table 
tracemem[0x0000000007aad7d8 -> 0x0000000018e454c8]: as.list.data.frame as.list vapply copy as.data.table.data.frame as.data.table data.table 
> class(data)
[1] "data.table" "data.frame"
> 
> # setDT method
> # back to data.frame
> data <- as.data.frame(data)
> class(data)
[1] "data.frame"
> tracemem(data)
[1] "<00000000125BE1A0>"
> setDT(data)
> tracemem(data)
[1] "<00000000125C2840>"
> class(data)
[1] "data.table" "data.frame"
> 

How does this impact timing? As we can see, setDT is much faster for it.

> # timing example
> data <- as.data.frame(rep(data.frame(rnorm(N)), P))
> microbenchmark(setDT(data), data <- data.table(data))
Unit: microseconds
                     expr       min         lq        mean    median            max neval        uq
              setDT(data)    49.948    55.7635    69.66017    73.553        100.238   100    79.198
 data <- data.table(data) 54594.289 61238.8830 81545.64432 64179.131     611632.427   100 68647.917

Set functions can be used in many areas, not just when converting objects to a data.tables. You can find more information on the reference semantics and how to apply them elsewhere by calling the vignette on the subject.

library(data.table)    
vignette("datatable-reference-semantics")

This is a great question and those thinking of using R with larger data sets or who just want to speed up data manipulation actives, can benefit from being familiar with the significant performance improvements of data.table reference semantics.

| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    You focus too much on memory. Changes by reference vs by copy have also huge speed implications which is more relevant for most people. A good answer should contain some benchmarks. Also, you shouldn't rely too much on information from ancient posts regarding these issues. Base R's memory management has evolved since 2009. – Roland Jul 6 '17 at 6:14
  • @Roland Thanks for the comments, and I always try to take a humble approach on these matters. However, upon looking deeper at this, I must say that my answer is in line with what the authors of data.table write in their documentation. Specifically, they created setDT to convert data.frames to data.tables without copy. Please see ?setDT. In fact, they even point to the same stack overflow post I listed above. Thanks – Justin Jul 7 '17 at 23:22
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    I think you are missing my point. Copies don't only need additional memory but the memory management takes substantial time. That's why avoiding copies is not only memory efficient but also time efficient. – Roland Jul 8 '17 at 0:04
  • Ok, yes I see your point now! I updated the post above, which I think is much better for your comments. Thanks for sticking with me on this. – Justin Jul 8 '17 at 1:58
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setDT() is not a replacement for data.table(). It's a more efficient replacement for as.data.table() which can be used with certain types of objects.

  • mydata <- as.data.table(mydata) will copy the object behind mydata, convert the copy to a data.table, then change the mydata symbol to point to the copy.
  • setDT(mydata) will change the object behind mydata to a data.table. No copying is done.

So what's a realistic situation to use setDT()? When you can't control the class of the original data. For instance, most packages for working with databases give data.frame output. In that case, your code would be something like

mydata <- dbGetQuery(conn, "SELECT * FROM mytable")  # Returns a data.frame
setDT(mydata)                                        # Make it a data.table

When should you use as.data.table(x)? Whenever x isn't a list or data.frame. The most common use is for matrices.

| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    Small nitpick: In your first bullet point you refer to a variable when you mean the mydata symbol. – Roland Jul 7 '17 at 10:19
  • The last question is not going to be answered as is. Better to make a separate example. my 2 cents – amonk Jul 24 '17 at 13:10

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