183

To make my code more "pythonic" and faster, I use multiprocessing and a map function to send it a) the function and b) the range of iterations.

The implanted solution (i.e., calling tqdm directly on the range tqdm.tqdm(range(0, 30))) does not work with multiprocessing (as formulated in the code below).

The progress bar is displayed from 0 to 100% (when python reads the code?) but it does not indicate the actual progress of the map function.

How can one display a progress bar that indicates at which step the 'map' function is ?

from multiprocessing import Pool
import tqdm
import time

def _foo(my_number):
   square = my_number * my_number
   time.sleep(1)
   return square 

if __name__ == '__main__':
   p = Pool(2)
   r = p.map(_foo, tqdm.tqdm(range(0, 30)))
   p.close()
   p.join()

Any help or suggestions are welcome...

2
  • Can you post the code snippet of the progress bar?
    – Alex
    Jan 29, 2017 at 12:14
  • 5
    For people in search for a solution with .starmap(): Here is a patch for Pool adding .istarmap(), which will also work with tqdm.
    – Darkonaut
    Aug 6, 2019 at 4:58

10 Answers 10

202

Use imap instead of map, which returns an iterator of the processed values.

from multiprocessing import Pool
import tqdm
import time

def _foo(my_number):
   square = my_number * my_number
   time.sleep(1)
   return square 

if __name__ == '__main__':
   with Pool(2) as p:
      r = list(tqdm.tqdm(p.imap(_foo, range(30)), total=30))
12
  • 24
    An enclosing list() statement waits for the iterator to end. total= is also required since tqdm does not know how long the iteration will be,
    – hkyi
    Aug 14, 2017 at 3:27
  • 28
    Is there a similar solution for starmap() ?
    – tarashypka
    Apr 20, 2018 at 8:56
  • 3
    for i in tqdm.tqdm(...): pass may be a more straight-forward, that list(tqdm.tqdm)
    – savfod
    Aug 2, 2018 at 10:54
  • 3
    This works but has anyone else had it continuously print the progress bar on a newline for each iteration?
    – Moo
    Nov 16, 2018 at 6:06
  • 6
    The behaviour is wired when specific chunk_size of p.imap. Can tqdm update every iteration instead of every chunk? Mar 26, 2019 at 10:41
156

Sorry for being late but if all you need is a concurrent map, I added this functionality in tqdm>=4.42.0:

from tqdm.contrib.concurrent import process_map  # or thread_map
import time

def _foo(my_number):
   square = my_number * my_number
   time.sleep(1)
   return square 

if __name__ == '__main__':
   r = process_map(_foo, range(0, 30), max_workers=2)

References: https://tqdm.github.io/docs/contrib.concurrent/ and https://github.com/tqdm/tqdm/blob/master/examples/parallel_bars.py

It supports max_workers and chunksize and you can also easily switch from process_map to thread_map.

13
  • 2
    I see an issue with discussion to hack tqdm_notebook, however, can't workout a solution to solve for tqdm.contrib.concurrent.
    – Ébe Isaac
    Jun 26, 2020 at 9:32
  • 2
    @Xudong process_map creates, runs , closes/joins and returns a list.
    – casper.dcl
    May 5, 2021 at 15:23
  • 2
    This is great! So glad I found it. One question remains, when I use this in a jupyter notebook, it doesn't work very well. I know there is a tqdm.notebook, is there someway to merge the two?
    – jlconlin
    May 17, 2021 at 19:02
  • 2
    This makes unconditional copies of the iterated arguments, while the others seems to do copy-on-write.
    – Passer By
    Jun 28, 2021 at 9:38
  • 5
    @jlconlin @Vladimir Vargas I don't have any issues if I do something like e.g. thread_map(fn, *iterables, tqdm_class=tqdm.notebook.tqdm, max_workers=12) in a Jupyter Notebook today.
    – snooze92
    Oct 13, 2021 at 7:14
82

Solution found. Be careful! Due to multiprocessing, the estimation time (iteration per loop, total time, etc.) could be unstable, but the progress bar works perfectly.

Note: Context manager for Pool is only available in Python 3.3+.

from multiprocessing import Pool
import time
from tqdm import *

def _foo(my_number):
   square = my_number * my_number
   time.sleep(1)
   return square 

if __name__ == '__main__':
    with Pool(processes=2) as p:
        max_ = 30
        with tqdm(total=max_) as pbar:
            for _ in p.imap_unordered(_foo, range(0, max_)):
                pbar.update()
8
  • 3
    pbar.close() not required, it will be closed automatically on termination of with
    – Sagar Kar
    Aug 30, 2017 at 16:56
  • 5
    Is the second/inner tqdm call necessary here? Dec 7, 2017 at 18:42
  • 7
    what about the output of the _foo(my_number) that is returned as "r" in question?
    – Likak
    Dec 20, 2017 at 22:31
  • 7
    Is there a similar solution for starmap() ?
    – tarashypka
    Apr 20, 2018 at 8:56
  • 4
    How do I retrieve the results with this solution? Sep 6, 2020 at 2:02
32

You can use p_tqdm instead.

https://github.com/swansonk14/p_tqdm

from p_tqdm import p_map
import time

def _foo(my_number):
   square = my_number * my_number
   time.sleep(1)
   return square 

if __name__ == '__main__':
   r = p_map(_foo, list(range(0, 30)))
7
  • 1
    This works extremely well, and it was very easy to pip install. This is replacing tqdm for most of my needs
    – crypdick
    Sep 21, 2019 at 19:46
  • Merci Victor ;) Dec 7, 2019 at 18:46
  • 3
    p_tqdm is limited to multiprocessing.Pool, not available for threads
    – pateheo
    Apr 15, 2020 at 12:59
  • 1
    @VictorWang Yes use it in num_cpus like this => p_map(_foo, list(range(0, 30)), num_cpus=5) Apr 23, 2021 at 16:00
  • 1
    @VandanRevanur You can pass kwargs to p_tqdm and they will be forwarded to tqdm, like so: github.com/swansonk14/p_tqdm/issues/5 May 6 at 19:34
9

based on the answer of Xavi Martínez I wrote the function imap_unordered_bar. It can be used in the same way as imap_unordered with the only difference that a processing bar is shown.

from multiprocessing import Pool
import time
from tqdm import *

def imap_unordered_bar(func, args, n_processes = 2):
    p = Pool(n_processes)
    res_list = []
    with tqdm(total = len(args)) as pbar:
        for i, res in tqdm(enumerate(p.imap_unordered(func, args))):
            pbar.update()
            res_list.append(res)
    pbar.close()
    p.close()
    p.join()
    return res_list

def _foo(my_number):
    square = my_number * my_number
    time.sleep(1)
    return square 

if __name__ == '__main__':
    result = imap_unordered_bar(_foo, range(5))
3
  • 4
    This will redraw the bar at each step on a new line. How to update the same line?
    – misantroop
    Apr 25, 2018 at 15:43
  • Solution in my case (Windows/Powershell): Colorama.
    – misantroop
    Apr 25, 2018 at 16:11
  • 'pbar.close() not required, it will be closed automatically on termination of with' like the comment Sagar made on @scipy's answer Sep 13, 2019 at 9:51
6
import multiprocessing as mp
import tqdm


iterable = ... 
num_cpu = mp.cpu_count() - 2 # dont use all cpus.


def func():
    # your logic
    ...


if __name__ == '__main__':
    with mp.Pool(num_cpu) as p:
        list(tqdm.tqdm(p.imap(func, iterable), total=len(iterable)))
4

For progress bar with apply_async, we can use following code as suggested in:

https://github.com/tqdm/tqdm/issues/484

import time
import random
from multiprocessing import Pool
from tqdm import tqdm

def myfunc(a):
    time.sleep(random.random())
    return a ** 2

pool = Pool(2)
pbar = tqdm(total=100)

def update(*a):
    pbar.update()

for i in range(pbar.total):
    pool.apply_async(myfunc, args=(i,), callback=update)
pool.close()
pool.join()
1

Here is my take for when you need to get results back from your parallel executing functions. This function does a few things (there is another post of mine that explains it further) but the key point is that there is a tasks pending queue and a tasks completed queue. As workers are done with each task in the pending queue they add the results in the tasks completed queue. You can wrap the check to the tasks completed queue with the tqdm progress bar. I am not putting the implementation of the do_work() function here, it is not relevant, as the message here is to monitor the tasks completed queue and update the progress bar every time a result is in.

def par_proc(job_list, num_cpus=None, verbose=False):

# Get the number of cores
if not num_cpus:
    num_cpus = psutil.cpu_count(logical=False)

print('* Parallel processing')
print('* Running on {} cores'.format(num_cpus))

# Set-up the queues for sending and receiving data to/from the workers
tasks_pending = mp.Queue()
tasks_completed = mp.Queue()

# Gather processes and results here
processes = []
results = []

# Count tasks
num_tasks = 0

# Add the tasks to the queue
for job in job_list:
    for task in job['tasks']:
        expanded_job = {}
        num_tasks = num_tasks + 1
        expanded_job.update({'func': pickle.dumps(job['func'])})
        expanded_job.update({'task': task})
        tasks_pending.put(expanded_job)

# Set the number of workers here
num_workers = min(num_cpus, num_tasks)

# We need as many sentinels as there are worker processes so that ALL processes exit when there is no more
# work left to be done.
for c in range(num_workers):
    tasks_pending.put(SENTINEL)

print('* Number of tasks: {}'.format(num_tasks))

# Set-up and start the workers
for c in range(num_workers):
    p = mp.Process(target=do_work, args=(tasks_pending, tasks_completed, verbose))
    p.name = 'worker' + str(c)
    processes.append(p)
    p.start()

# Gather the results
completed_tasks_counter = 0

with tqdm(total=num_tasks) as bar:
    while completed_tasks_counter < num_tasks:
        results.append(tasks_completed.get())
        completed_tasks_counter = completed_tasks_counter + 1
        bar.update(completed_tasks_counter)

for p in processes:
    p.join()

return results
1

Based on "user17242583" answer, I created the following function. It should be as fast as Pool.map and the results are always ordered. Plus, you can pass as many parameters to your function as you want and not just a single iterable.

from multiprocessing import Pool
from functools import partial
from tqdm import tqdm


def imap_tqdm(function, iterable, processes, chunksize=1, desc=None, disable=False, **kwargs):
    """
    Run a function in parallel with a tqdm progress bar and an arbitrary number of arguments.
    Results are always ordered and the performance should be the same as of Pool.map.
    :param function: The function that should be parallelized.
    :param iterable: The iterable passed to the function.
    :param processes: The number of processes used for the parallelization.
    :param chunksize: The iterable is based on the chunk size chopped into chunks and submitted to the process pool as separate tasks.
    :param desc: The description displayed by tqdm in the progress bar.
    :param disable: Disables the tqdm progress bar.
    :param kwargs: Any additional arguments that should be passed to the function.
    """
    if kwargs:
        function_wrapper = partial(_wrapper, function=function, **kwargs)
    else:
        function_wrapper = partial(_wrapper, function=function)

    results = [None] * len(iterable)
    with Pool(processes=processes) as p:
        with tqdm(desc=desc, total=len(iterable), disable=disable) as pbar:
            for i, result in p.imap_unordered(function_wrapper, enumerate(iterable), chunksize=chunksize):
                results[i] = result
                pbar.update()
    return results


def _wrapper(enum_iterable, function, **kwargs):
    i = enum_iterable[0]
    result = function(enum_iterable[1], **kwargs)
    return i, result
-3

This approach simple and it works.

from multiprocessing.pool import ThreadPool
import time
from tqdm import tqdm

def job():
    time.sleep(1)
    pbar.update()

pool = ThreadPool(5)
with tqdm(total=100) as pbar:
    for i in range(100):
        pool.apply_async(job)
    pool.close()
    pool.join()

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