23

While i was looking at some legacy application code i noticed it is using a string object to do thread synchronization. I'm trying to resolve some thread contention issues in this program and was wondering if this could lead so some strange situations. Any thoughts ?

private static string mutex= "ABC";

internal static void Foo(Rpc rpc)
{
    lock (mutex)
    {
        //do something
    }
}
37

Strings like that (from the code) could be "interned". This means all instances of "ABC" point to the same object. Even across AppDomains you can point to the same object (thx Steven for the tip).

If you have a lot of string-mutexes, from different locations, but with the same text, they could all lock on the same object.

The intern pool conserves string storage. If you assign a literal string constant to several variables, each variable is set to reference the same constant in the intern pool instead of referencing several different instances of String that have identical values.

It's better to use:

 private static readonly object mutex = new object();

Also, since your string is not const or readonly, you can change it. So (in theory) it is possible to lock on your mutex. Change mutex to another reference, and then enter a critical section because the lock uses another object/reference. Example:

private static string mutex = "1";
private static string mutex2 = "1";  // for 'lock' mutex2 and mutex are the same

private static void CriticalButFlawedMethod() {
    lock(mutex) {
      mutex += "."; // Hey, now mutex points to another reference/object
      // You are free to re-enter
      ...
    }
}
  • Thanks GvS. But I was wondering if there is a difference in using a object type ( which we generally do) to lock against using a string type ( string being mutable ). the program is having large number of thread contentions ( not sure as yet if that is due to this piece of code) . – Illuminati Nov 16 '10 at 10:17
  • Strings are not mutable, they just look mutable, but every different string points to another reference. It looks strange to me to lock on them. Did you try a ReaderWriterLock. – GvS Nov 16 '10 at 10:21
  • 1
    The string is "immutable" but the reference is not. I added some code to illustrate this. – GvS Nov 16 '10 at 10:27
  • 8
    I like to add that .NET is even allowed to share string instances (as well as Type instances) across AppDomains, which could make to AppDomains deadlock on each other! In other words, locking on strings is really scary. – Steven Nov 16 '10 at 10:27
  • 1
    @Steven - do you have a reference for the above comment on sharing string instances across AppDomains? – Armbrat Dec 2 '10 at 13:49
25

To answer your question (as some others already have), there are some potential problems with the code example you provided:

private static string mutex= "ABC";
  • The variable mutex is not immutable.
  • The string literal "ABC" will refer to the same interned object reference everywhere in your application.

In general, I would advise against locking on strings. However, there is a case I've ran into where it is useful to do this.

There have been occasions where I have maintained a dictionary of lock objects where the key is something unique about some data that I have. Here's a contrived example:

void Main()
{
    var a = new SomeEntity{ Id = 1 };
    var b = new SomeEntity{ Id = 2 };

    Task.Run(() => DoSomething(a));    
    Task.Run(() => DoSomething(a));    
    Task.Run(() => DoSomething(b));    
    Task.Run(() => DoSomething(b));
}

ConcurrentDictionary<int, object> _locks = new ConcurrentDictionary<int, object>();    
void DoSomething(SomeEntity entity)
{   
    var mutex = _locks.GetOrAdd(entity.Id, id => new object());

    lock(mutex)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Inside {0}", entity.Id);
        // do some work
    }
}   

The goal of code like this is to serialize concurrent invocations of DoSomething() within the context of the entity's Id. The downside is the dictionary. The more entities there are, the larger it gets. It's also just more code to read and think about.

I think .NET's string interning can simplify things:

void Main()
{
    var a = new SomeEntity{ Id = 1 };
    var b = new SomeEntity{ Id = 2 };

    Task.Run(() => DoSomething(a));    
    Task.Run(() => DoSomething(a));    
    Task.Run(() => DoSomething(b));    
    Task.Run(() => DoSomething(b));
}

void DoSomething(SomeEntity entity)
{   
    lock(string.Intern("dee9e550-50b5-41ae-af70-f03797ff2a5d:" + entity.Id))
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Inside {0}", entity.Id);
        // do some work
    }
}

The difference here is that I am relying on the string interning to give me the same object reference per entity id. This simplifies my code because I don't have to maintain the dictionary of mutex instances.

Notice the hard-coded UUID string that I'm using as a namespace. This is important if I choose to adopt the same approach of locking on strings in another area of my application.

Locking on strings can be a good idea or a bad idea depending on the circumstances and the attention that the developer gives to the details.

  • 2
    This answer was actually what I was looking for. I need a guarantee that the same string will make the same mutex object and a string interning is a very neat mechanizm to use for that. I need it for purposes of caching: multiple threads may retreive the same object from DB and they must insert only 1 entry to THE cache, which has a key of "Id". So now I just construct a string for locking from this Id and some arbitrary string that will never be used anywhere ever (something like Guid for those who want to be relatively safe), and do the object instantiation and cache update in this lock. – evilkos Aug 13 '15 at 13:05
  • I'm glad you found this approach useful! – Ronnie Overby Aug 13 '15 at 16:26
  • The problem with the infinitely growinh dictionary can be fixed by using ConditionalWeakTable. This is a dictionary that allows both the keys as the values to go out of scope, which allows things to get garbage collectedm – Steven Sep 14 '16 at 6:03
  • 1
    @Steven Agreed about ConditionalWeakTable. That's a really handy class. I've talked about another type of usage in another answer stackoverflow.com/a/38226358/64334 I've been using it a lot lately with some object extension methods for attaching anything to anything. It's pretty great. – Ronnie Overby Sep 14 '16 at 14:24
  • 1
    it's worth to mention the problem with using string.Intern is that it's also infinitely growing. as stated by MSDN the memory allocated for interned String objects is not likely be released until the common language runtime (CLR) terminates.. it's a sort of a memory leak you are introducing into your code, so it must be used with extra care – AmitE Mar 20 '18 at 16:06
1

If you need to lock a string, you can create an object that pairs the string with an object that you can lock with.

class LockableString
{
     public string _String; 
     public object MyLock;  //Provide a lock to the data in.

     public LockableString()
     {
          MyLock = new object();
     }
}
0

I imagine that locking on interned strings could lead to memory bloat if the strings generated are many and are all unique. Another approach that should be more memory efficient and solve the immediate deadlock issue is

// Returns an Object to Lock with based on a string Value
private static readonly ConditionalWeakTable<string, object> _weakTable = new ConditionalWeakTable<string, object>();
public static object GetLock(string value)
{
    if (value == null) throw new ArgumentNullException(nameof(value));
    return _weakTable.GetOrCreateValue(value.ToLower());
}

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