17

What I'm trying to do is display the content of table using the following code in Lua.

local people = {
   {
   name = "Fred",
   address = "16 Long Street",
   phone = "123456"
   },

   {
   name = "Wilma",
   address = "16 Long Street",
   phone = "123456"
   },

   {
   name = "Barney",
   address = "17 Long Street",
   phone = "123457"
   }

}
for k, v in pairs(people ) do
    print(k, v)
end

The output I got is:

1   table: 0x9a2d8b0
2   table: 0x9a2d110
3   table: 0x9a2cb28

6 Answers 6

19

To display nested tables you will have to use nested loops.

Also, use ipairs to iterate through array-like tables, and pairs to iterate through record-like tables.

local people = {
   {
       name = "Fred",
       address = "16 Long Street",
       phone = "123456"
   },
   {
       name = "Wilma",
       address = "16 Long Street",
       phone = "123456"
   },
   {
       name = "Barney",
       address = "17 Long Street",
       phone = "123457"
   }
}

for index, data in ipairs(people) do
    print(index)

    for key, value in pairs(data) do
        print('\t', key, value)
    end
end

Output:

1   
        phone   123456          
        name    Fred            
        address 16 Long Street          
2   
        phone   123456          
        name    Wilma           
        address 16 Long Street          
3   
        phone   123457          
        name    Barney          
        address 17 Long Street  
1
  • 2
    @Oka How can one dynamically tell whether a table is array-like or record-like?
    – Shejo284
    Jul 4, 2018 at 11:42
17

This recursively serializes a table. A variant of this code may be used to generate JSON from a table.

function tprint (tbl, indent)
  if not indent then indent = 0 end
  local toprint = string.rep(" ", indent) .. "{\r\n"
  indent = indent + 2 
  for k, v in pairs(tbl) do
    toprint = toprint .. string.rep(" ", indent)
    if (type(k) == "number") then
      toprint = toprint .. "[" .. k .. "] = "
    elseif (type(k) == "string") then
      toprint = toprint  .. k ..  "= "   
    end
    if (type(v) == "number") then
      toprint = toprint .. v .. ",\r\n"
    elseif (type(v) == "string") then
      toprint = toprint .. "\"" .. v .. "\",\r\n"
    elseif (type(v) == "table") then
      toprint = toprint .. tprint(v, indent + 2) .. ",\r\n"
    else
      toprint = toprint .. "\"" .. tostring(v) .. "\",\r\n"
    end
  end
  toprint = toprint .. string.rep(" ", indent-2) .. "}"
  return toprint
end

running your table through this:

 local people = {
   {
   name = "Fred",
   address = "16 Long Street",
   phone = "123456"
   },

   {
   name = "Wilma",
   address = "16 Long Street",
   phone = "123456"
   },

   {
   name = "Barney",
   address = "17 Long Street",
   phone = "123457"
   }

}


print (tprint(people))

generates this:

  {
  [1] =     {
      name= "Fred",
      phone= "123456",
      address= "16 Long Street",
    },
  [2] =     {
      name= "Wilma",
      phone= "123456",
      address= "16 Long Street",
    },
  [3] =     {
      name= "Barney",
      phone= "123457",
      address= "17 Long Street",
    },
}
4

If you have static predefined field names in your data records, this simpler version may work for you:

for i,t in ipairs(people) do
  print('Record',i)
  print('Name',t.name)
  print('Address',t.address)
  print('Phone',t.phone)
  print()
end
1
  • 3
    This has the advantage that you can choose the order the fields are shown.
    – lhf
    Jan 31, 2017 at 10:16
1

Solution 1: py.repr https://github.com/waketzheng/luapy

$ wget https://raw.githubusercontent.com/waketzheng/luapy/main/python.lua

py=require('python')
> tab = { 1, 2, 3 }
> py.repr(tab)
[
    1,
    2,
    3
]
> tab = { a=1, b=2, c=3 }
> py.repr(tab)
{
    "c": 3,
    "a": 1,
    "b": 2
}
> tab = { a='a', b='b', c='c', d='d', e='e', f='f', g='g' }
> py.repr(tab)
{
    "g": "g",
    "a": "a",
    "b": "b",
    "c": "c",
    "d": "d",
    ...
}

Solution 2: lu.prettystr https://luaunit.readthedocs.io/en/latest/#pretty-printing

$ wget https://raw.githubusercontent.com/bluebird75/luaunit/main/luaunit.lua

> lu = require('luaunit')
> t1 = {1,2,3}
> t1['toto'] = 'titi'
> t1.f = function () end
> t1.fa = (1 == 0)
> t1.tr = (1 == 1)
> print( lu.prettystr(t1) )
{1, 2, 3, f=function: 00635d68, fa=false, toto="titi", tr=true}
0

I'm not sure what IDE you are working out of. But for any reason you and anyone else who finds this thread, is working in Visual Studio Code, the Lua Debug extension will do a great job in displaying all your associative array values for the custom tables you build.

What I really like about it, is that you can display not only your initial values, but if you decide to later change a value, you can do that with this extension and see your adjustments, all through the "Debug Console" tab.

I took your exact example, and simply typed in people into the debug, and go all values displayed.

0

Assuming your data structures are JSON serializable (like your example above) you can just cheat and use rxi/json.lua (MIT License) to aid in pretty printing objects. Just drop json.lua into your project and this will work:

json = require "json"
for k, v in pairs(people) do
    print(k, json.encode(v))
end
1       {"address":"16 Long Street","name":"Fred","phone":"123456"}
2       {"address":"16 Long Street","name":"Wilma","phone":"123456"}
3       {"address":"17 Long Street","name":"Barney","phone":"123457"}

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