15

In my Azure Function I am using a Library which establishes a connection to an SQL server via the ConnectionString from the ConfigurationManager like this:

var cs = System.Configuration.ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings["DbConString"].ConnectionString;
DbConnection connection = new SqlConnection(cs);

Now when i set the connection string DbConString in the portal via the Application Settings everything is working fine. But for local development I use the azure-functions-cli and unfortunately I have no idea where i should place the connection string to have it loaded correctly via the ConfigurationManager.

I've tried to place it in the appsettings.json file but without success.

Edit: My appsettings.json currently looks like this:

{
  "IsEncrypted": false,
  "Values": {
    "AzureWebJobsStorage": "",
    "AzureWebJobsDashboard": "",
    "MyServiceBusReader": "Endpoint=sb://xxxx=",
    "DbConStr1": "data source=(localdb)\\MSSQLLocalDB;initial catalog=MyDb;integrated security=True;MultipleActiveResultSets=True;App=EntityFramework",
    "ConnectionStrings": {
      "DbConStr2": "data source=(localdb)\\MS..." 
    } 
  }
}

But I am not able to access "DbConStr1" via the ConfigurationManager. Adding "DbConStr2" within "ConnectionStrings" like described here leads to a compilation error. Maybe because I am not using .NET Core?

Edit2: I messed up the nesting of "ConnectionStrings". It has to be on the same nesting level as "Values":

{
  "IsEncrypted": false,
  "Values": {
    "AzureWebJobsStorage": "",
    "AzureWebJobsDashboard": "",
    "MyServiceBusReader": "Endpoint=sb://xxxx="
  },
  "ConnectionStrings": {
    "DbConStr": "data source=(localdb)\\MS..." 
  }
}
10
  • Are you using .NET Core? I assume if you are using an application.json file you are.
    – awh112
    Jan 30, 2017 at 19:36
  • No I don't use .NET Core. I thought that using application.json is just how Azure Functions work?
    – officer
    Jan 30, 2017 at 19:41
  • 1
    Actually, it looks like, at least for me, spinning up a .NET function uses v4.6 so you are correct in that it is not yet .NET Core.
    – awh112
    Jan 30, 2017 at 19:53
  • Does that mean, that it should also be possible to use an app.config instead of application.json?
    – officer
    Jan 30, 2017 at 20:05
  • 1
    Per your edit, your connection strings should definitely be under the ConnectionStrings node. Can you access any settings at all? I might try making sure the file is named appropriately appsettings.json in case your function is configured to look for that filename by convention.
    – awh112
    Jan 30, 2017 at 20:14

6 Answers 6

5

Add file local.setting.json

enter image description here

  {
    {
      "IsEncrypted": false,
       "Values": {
      "AzureWebJobsStorage": "UseDevelopmentStorage=true",
      "AzureWebJobsDashboard": "UseDevelopmentStorage=true",

      "tenantId": "You tenantId",
      "resource": "https://management.azure.com/",
      "ClientSecret": "You ClientSecret, Key from App Registry",
      "ClientId": "You ClientId, Application ID from App registry",

      "subscriptionId": "You subscriptionId",
      "resourceGroupName": "Your resourceGroupName",
      "serverName": " Your SQL Server",
      "databaseNameDW": "Your Database",
      "apiversion": "2017-10-01-preview"      
    }
}

In C# Code use:

private readonly static string tenantId = ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["tenantId"];
2
  • How do you push the local.setting.json ? I have deployment my azure function from a github repo so I am going to add this file in my repo.
    – Yassir S
    Oct 20, 2018 at 16:32
  • 1
    in azure function v2 the ConfigurationManager.AppSettings does load NOTHING from the local.settings.json file!
    – HelloWorld
    Jul 3, 2020 at 11:21
5
// C# Environment Variables example for Azure Functions v1 or v2 runtime
// This works all the way up to but not including .NET Core 2.0
var clientId = Environment.GetEnvironmentVariable("ClientId");
var clientSecret = Environment.GetEnvironmentVariable("ClientSecret");
var aadDomain = Environment.GetEnvironmentVariable("AADDomain");

Please do remember the settings you do in local.settings.json will not be reflected in azure. Please add your values in app setting from Azure portal follow the link- https://learn.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/azure-functions/functions-how-to-use-azure-function-app-settings

4

I've found a method which feels hacky, but works: if you do evaluate Environment.GetEnvironmentVariables() you can spot that all Connection Strings from your local.settings.json are available as Environment Variables with a "ConnectionStrings:" prefix if run locally, or one from several "xxxCONNSTR_" if running on Azure, so you can define this helper function:

    private static Array ConnectionStringKeyPrefixes = new[] { "ConnectionStrings:", "SQLCONNSTR_", "SQLAZURECONNSTR_", "MYSQLCONNSTR_", "POSTGRESQLCONNSTR_", "CUSTOMCONNSTR_" };
    public static string GetConnectionStringFromSettings(string connectionStringName)
    {
        string connectionString = null;

        foreach(string prefix in ConnectionStringKeyPrefixes) {
            connectionString = Environment.GetEnvironmentVariable($"{prefix}{connectionStringName}");

            if (!string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(connectionString))
            {
                break;
            }
        }

        return connectionString;
    }
1
  • A simple Environment.GetEnvironmentVariable("ConnectionStrings:DbConStr2") works as a charm for EF.core + .net6 Feb 10, 2023 at 13:45
3

I had this same issue and am using .net standard (as opposed to core). I added my settings to the Application Settings section of my Azure function (in Azure Portal):-

enter image description here

I then downloaded a zip of the function:- enter image description here

Included in this download is a copy of local.settings.json that includes my app settings in the correct json format. I then access them via ConfigurationManager.Appsettings["mysetting"]

2

The problem was, that a connection string known from e.g. a Web.config file consists of two parts:

  • The connection string itself and
  • the provider name.

But since the configuration file uses the JSON format it was not possible to specify both parameters.

At the time when the question was asked, it was not possible to set the provider name in the appsetings.json (now renamed to local.settings.json). But the Azure-Functions-team change this and set a default value for providerName to System.Data.SqlClient, which solved the problem.

The providerName defaults to System.Data.SqlClient. You don't have to set it manually. Just add your connection string X and read it via ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings["X"].

3
  • 7
    Can you provide some code or a link to show us exactly how this is achieved? Jan 22, 2018 at 7:20
  • 2
    How what is achieved? The providerName defaults to System.Data.SqlClient. You don't have to set it manually. Just add your connection string X and read it via ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings["X"]
    – officer
    Jun 14, 2018 at 10:47
  • ConfigurationManager from which namespace?
    – Md Aslam
    Oct 18, 2021 at 12:11
0

You should be able to manage your configuration settings with an appsettings.json file in your project structure. You can take a look here for an example of the folder structure for Azure Functions.

Additionally, this link will have some details about how to manage configuration settings with .NET Core.

2

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