4

I am new to Python so this may be pretty straightforward, but I have not been able to find a good answer for my problem after looking for a while. I am trying to create a Pandas dataframe from a list of dictionaries.

My list of nested dictionaries is the following:

my_list = [{0: {'a': '23', 'b': '15', 'c': '5', 'd': '-1'}, 
            1: {'a': '5', 'b': '6', 'c': '7', 'd': '9'}, 
            2: {'a': '9', 'b': '15', 'c': '5', 'd': '7'}}, 
           {0: {'a': '5', 'b': '249', 'c': '92', 'd': '-4'}, 
            1: {'a': '51', 'b': '5', 'c': '34', 'd': '1'}, 
            2: {'a': '3', 'b': '8', 'c': '3', 'd': '11'}}]

So each key in the main dictionaries has 3 values.

Putting these into a dataframe using data = pd.DataFrame(my_list) returns something unusable, as each cell has information on a, b, c and d in it.

I want to end up with a dataframe that looks like this:

 name| a  | b  | c | d 
0    | 23 | 15 | 5 | -1 
1    | 5  | 6  | 7 |  9 
2    | 9  | 15 | 5 |  7 
0    | 5  |249 | 92| -4 
1    |51  | 5  | 34|  1 
2    | 3  | 8  | 3 | 11 

Is this possible?

4

Easy:

pd.concat([pd.DataFrame(l) for l in my_list],axis=1).T
  • Thank you! This worked! – aliki43 Jan 30 '17 at 23:59
  • This is anything but "easy". It works though. – zerohedge Jun 7 at 21:54
3

Another solution:

from itertools import chain
pd.DataFrame.from_items(list(chain.from_iterable(d.iteritems() for d in my_list))).T

In my experiments, this is faster than using pd.concat (especially when the number of "sub-dataframes" is large) at the cost of being more verbose.

  • Thank you so much! When I try this code, I get the error: NameError: name 'chain' is not defined. Would you know why? Otherwise, I think I understand the intuition of this code. – aliki43 Jan 31 '17 at 0:01
  • Sorry, forgot to specify the import. I was using itertools.chain, part of the standard library. Please see edit. – Igor Raush Jan 31 '17 at 0:41
  • Thank you! I'll try both pd.concat and this one, since I do have a lot of data to work with. – aliki43 Jan 31 '17 at 8:43
  • Just a quick update: I didn't see any huge difference in terms of time for processing between pd.concat and this method, maybe because my dataset was not that massive (20,000 observations in all). Thank you again! – aliki43 Feb 1 '17 at 0:42
  • I would guess that the number of observations doesn't matter as much as the number of "chunks." There is a fairly big overhead in creating a DataFrame from each chunk and then going through the cumbersome index alignment with pd.concat, but it doesn't matter as much if you only have a few chunks. Anyway, glad you solved your problem. – Igor Raush Feb 1 '17 at 0:45
1

You can munge the list of dictionaries to be accetable to a DataFrame constructor:

In [4]: pd.DataFrame.from_records([{'name': k, **v} for d in my_list for k,v in d.items()])
Out[4]:
    a    b   c   d  name
0  23   15   5  -1     0
1   5    6   7   9     1
2   9   15   5   7     2
3   5  249  92  -4     0
4  51    5  34   1     1
5   3    8   3  11     2

In [5]: df = pd.DataFrame.from_records([{'name': k, **v} for d in my_list for k,v in d.items()])

In [6]: df.set_index('name',inplace=True)

In [7]: df
Out[7]:
       a    b   c   d
name
0     23   15   5  -1
1      5    6   7   9
2      9   15   5   7
0      5  249  92  -4
1     51    5  34   1
2      3    8   3  11

This requires relatively recent versions of Python for {'name':'something', **rest} to work. It is merely a shorthand for the following:

In [13]: reshaped = []
    ...: for d in my_list:
    ...:     for k, v in d.items():
    ...:         new = {'name': k}
    ...:         new.update(v)
    ...:         reshaped.append(new)
    ...:

In [14]: reshaped
Out[14]:
[{'a': '23', 'b': '15', 'c': '5', 'd': '-1', 'name': 0},
 {'a': '5', 'b': '6', 'c': '7', 'd': '9', 'name': 1},
 {'a': '9', 'b': '15', 'c': '5', 'd': '7', 'name': 2},
 {'a': '5', 'b': '249', 'c': '92', 'd': '-4', 'name': 0},
 {'a': '51', 'b': '5', 'c': '34', 'd': '1', 'name': 1},
 {'a': '3', 'b': '8', 'c': '3', 'd': '11', 'name': 2}]
  • Thank you! This is super useful. – aliki43 Jan 31 '17 at 0:02

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