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This question already has an answer here:

Say I have a git log that looks like this:

commit 8379fef8952c9fde4c4f8bb9b3fb5dab80a61bc9
...

commit cc6c393f707da82aa3f0753db81b148d7eddaaf1
...

commit 6668e9087e3561b7797c91730f4ac0057fa85904
...

commit 2da2d26974d1ef57a02f3dfe2c7b5aa310f2efac
...

commit a625c16a2985d06f10fb72db9e6952fdf51e5000
...

Say I want to revert back to the bottom one a625c16... and that all the work above it is terrible. I basically want to blow away everything I did in the last 4 commits and restart from the bottom commit. When I checkout that commit, I'm on no branch and a detached HEAD state. What does that mean? What needs to be done so I can continue working on this branch but from 4 commits ago?

marked as duplicate by bahrep, Scott Weldon, approxiblue, Parfait, Robbie Averill Feb 1 '17 at 5:41

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • Assuming you are working on branch master then rename it to e.g. BAD_BRANCH, then create a new master branch from your last good commit. If you decide you do need any of the changes in BAD_BRANCH then you can merge those to your new master branch later. – Paul R Jan 31 '17 at 17:12
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if you haven't pushed this, you can do

git reset --hard a625c16a2985d06f10fb72db9e6952fdf51e5000

This will discard all the changes completely and forget they every happened. However, this will mean that you will have to do git push --force if you've published this anywhere, which might be considered dangerous / antisocial.

If you want to avoid that you can do

git revert 8379fef8952c9fde4c4f8bb9b3fb5dab80a61bc9
...
git revert 2da2d26974d1ef57a02f3dfe2c7b5aa310f2efac

Which will cleanly backout all the changes, and you'll be able to push without --force. This does mean all your changes and reversions will be visible in the history.

  • what if I have pushed it? – Jwan622 Jan 31 '17 at 20:37
  • as I said in the answer, do the reverts, or use --force – Tom Tanner Feb 1 '17 at 10:12
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If you already have the commit you want checked out as detached HEAD, you can simply do git branch -f branchname && git checkout branchname.

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