8

the scenarion is like this...

I HAVE a namespace XXX where I created some tables and some stored procedures...

THEY HAVE a namespace YYY where they created some tables...

THEY GRANTED XXX access to their tables, so when I conect to SQL Developer using XXX connection, I can do:

SELECT * FROM YYY.TableA

But if I try to run that very same statement from inside a stored procedure (either simple stored procedure or a package), the stored procedure does not compile. It happens to a lot of sp's. Is there any other permission that I have to ask for??? I'm running sp's like this:

CREATE OR REPLACE PROCEDURE PRC_SOMESP(
) AS BEGIN
END PRC_SOMESP;

Procedures that does not access YYY tables do compile well.

Thanks in advance.

After Justin Cave response, I'm trying to add "AUTHID CURRENT_USER" sentence to the sp's but getting the same "table or view does not exist" result:

CREATE OR REPLACE PROCEDURE PRC_PROC1( PARAMETERS... )  
AUTHID CURRENT_USER  
AS  
    MYVAR NUMBER;  
BEGIN  
    STATEMENTS...
END PRC_PROC1;  

CREATE OR REPLACE PACKAGE PKG_PROC2  
AUTHID CURRENT_USER  
AS  
TYPE T_CURSOR IS REF CURSOR;
PROCEDURE PRC_PROC2( PARAMETERS... )  
END PKG_PROC2  

Should I check anything else???

  • First, you don't run SPs like you say you do, you create them. Second, make sure the PRC_SOMESP() has the right priviledges over YYY.TableA to select from it. – Will Marcouiller Nov 16 '10 at 19:28
11

Most likely, the problem is that the grant was done via a role. Privileges granted to a user are not available in a definer's rights stored procedure (the default).

In SQL Developer, it is relatively easy to verify that this is the problem. If you run the command

SET ROLE none

and then run the SELECT statement, I would expect that you would get the same ORA-00942 error.

Assuming that is the case, the solution would generally be to ask that the owners of the tables in the YYY schema to grant access to the tables directly to you rather than granting access via a role. Barring that, you could define your stored procedure as an invoker's rights stored procedure by adding AUTHID CURRENT_USER to the declaration. That would that the caller of the procedure would need to have access to the underlying objects but it would allow your procedures to make use of privileges granted through a role.

If you want to create an invoker's rights stored procedure, you will also need to refer to the table name using dynamic SQL in order to defer the privilege check to runtime. So you would have something like

CREATE OR REPLACE PROCEDURE PRC_SOMESP 
  AUTHID CURRENT_USER
AS 
  l_cnt pls_integer;
BEGIN
  EXECUTE IMMEDIATE 'SELECT COUNT(*) FROM yyy.TableA' INTO l_cnt;
END PRC_SOMESP;

if you wanted an invoker's rights stored procedure that queried the TableA table in schema XXX.

  • Yes, this is exactly the problem Justin... Could you please write how the stored procedure declaration should be by adding the "AUTHID CURRENT_USER" sentence??? I read this other link but I can't find an example: articles.techrepublic.com.com/5100-10878_11-6183799.html – user509925 Nov 16 '10 at 19:45
  • @user509925 - Added the example to my answer. – Justin Cave Nov 16 '10 at 20:09
  • Hi again, I added some results to my question, could you please help??? – user509925 Nov 16 '10 at 20:22
  • @user509925 - Sorry about that. My last update was quite incorrect. You need to use dynamic SQL to defer the privilege check to runtime at which point AUTHID CURRENT_USER allows Oracle to make use of privileges granted via roles. Updated my answer to reflect that. – Justin Cave Nov 16 '10 at 20:38
  • ups.. can't do dynamic sql... I'm changing my stored procedures to normal queries... this Oracle stuff is being a torure man. Thanks for your answers Justin... I think Stackoverflow does not let me give points yet (privileges, ja), so, sorry for that – user509925 Nov 16 '10 at 20:52
0

In your stored procedures on schema XXX if you access tables from YYY schema, make sure you fully qualify them:

select count(1) from YYY.TableA;

Other thing to consider is casing (in case you are mixing upper and lowercase in your Oracle identifiers).

One last thing: post the error you are getting. It will be easier to help you that way.

  • If your database has a schema per customer for example, this solution would work but wouldn't be very elegant. it would take a version of the same SP for each customer to work for each of them. – Nicolas de Fontenay Nov 18 '14 at 22:46
0

I just had this same problem. I'm not a DBA but the way it was explained to me is "The basic thing is that your personal role privileges aren't in effect within the stored procedure."

I was advised to qualify the name of the SP with the owner of tables, like this:

CREATE OR REPLACE PROCEDURE yyy.PRC_PROC1( PARAMETERS... ) etc

This worked in my case in my dev environment. My environment only has one namespace so I'm not sure this will solve the OP's question but hopefully will help to move this issue forward for the next 18K people that look up this question ;-).

Also, when I put my SP into production, I will need to remove the qualifier and our installation software will run create under the proper authority.

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