22

I have a JSON object, say:

{
  "foo": {
    "bar": 1
  },
  "baz": 2
}

and I want to bind it into a Java object, like:

@JsonIgnoreProperties(ignoreUnknown = true)
public class Foo {
  private int bar;
  @JsonProperty("baz")
  private int baz;
}

How can I set the value of foo.bar from JSON to the bar field in the Foo Java object?

I've tried annotating the field with @JsonProperty("foo.bar"), but it doesn't work like that.

45

This ain't perfect but it's the most elegant way I could figure out.

@JsonProperty("foo")
public void setFoo(Map<String, Object> foo) {
  bar = (Integer) foo.get("bar");
}
2

There is no automated functionality for this (as far as I know), but this is a somewhat often requested feature; there is this Jira RFE: http://jira.codehaus.org/browse/JACKSON-132 that sounds like what you are looking for.

  • Yes that's the same issue, though I'd use it for deserialization. I guess my solution above is the best I can get if I don't want to change the structure of the Foo object. – hleinone Nov 17 '10 at 0:32
  • Yes I think so. – StaxMan Dec 19 '10 at 19:01
-3

Here a quick example that works:

JSON:

[{"function":{"name":"Function 1"}},
 {"function":{"name":"Function 2"}}]

Java:

import java.util.Map;

import javax.xml.bind.annotation.XmlRootElement;

import lombok.Getter;
import lombok.Setter;
import lombok.ToString;

import org.codehaus.jackson.annotate.JsonIgnoreProperties;
import org.codehaus.jackson.annotate.JsonProperty;
@Getter
@Setter
@ToString
@JsonIgnoreProperties(ignoreUnknown = true)
public class Function {
    @JsonProperty("name")
    private String name;

    @JsonProperty("function")
    public void setFunction(Map<String, Object> function) {
      name = (String) function.get("name");
    }
}
  • 1
    This is no different from the accepted answer. – hleinone Jun 5 '14 at 19:48
  • 1
    Why the need to include a bunch of lombok stuff in your answer? It would actually have the same result without those. – Simon Forsberg Jan 21 '15 at 19:44
-17

That's like binding an apple to an orange! Another 'catchy phrase' would be, "Impedance Mismatch", or in Star Trek 1, "Non Sequetor!" Bind it a MATCHED object, then do new assignment in Java between the different kinds of objects.

  • 8
    Not really helpful. I wouldn't like to create useless Java classes just because someone couldn't design a decent JSON API. – hleinone Nov 13 '12 at 7:26
  • 3
    Agreed with @hleinone. One is not always in control of the API and having to create nested classes/maps/hacks/voodoo is not the right solution. – kontinuity Dec 12 '12 at 10:51

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.