1
#define DECLARE_TYPE(T)     \
    typedef struct          \
    {                       \
        float value;        \
        int scale;          \
    } ae_T##_t;

DECLARE_TYPE(Q25);

This should create type ae_Q25_t, but it doesn't work.

How to rewrite?

0
5

Firstly, naturally, it should be ae_##T##_t. Note that _ character in C is not a punctuator, it is a regular "text" character (as opposed to , say, :, ,, space and others). This means that ae_T is seen by preprocessor as a single continuous indivisible token, not as ae followed by _ and followed by T.

Secondly, keep in mind that it won't work as expected if, say, Q25 is itself a macro and you want it substituted. To resolve this issue you need a two-tier macro definition

#define DECLARE_TYPE_(T)    \
    typedef struct          \
    {                       \
        float value;        \
        int scale;          \
    } ae_##T##_t;

#define DECLARE_TYPE(T) DECLARE_TYPE_(T)

But if you want DECLARE_TYPE(Q25) to always resolve to ae_Q25_t specifically, then you are good as is.

4
  • 1
    And here comes the Macros Ninja ! – P0W Feb 2 '17 at 9:21
  • All examples I've seen when I searched "c token concatenation" use ## on only right side. And example that compiles is also one-sided ##: #define DECLARE_CTYPE(s) \ namespace s##_space { \ class s##_; \ } \ typedef s##_space::s##_ s; Very strange, many thanks. – Danijel Feb 2 '17 at 9:35
  • @Danijel Those example also happen to have a white space before or after the parameter, do they not? In this case you must use the concatenation on both sides because the preprocessor treats ae_T as a single token. – StoryTeller - Unslander Monica Feb 2 '17 at 9:41
  • 1
    Well, punctuators (like ::) and whitespace don't merge with identifiers. They remain separate preprocessing tokens, which is why you don't need to do anything extra on the left-hand side of s in namespace s##_space or in typedef s##_space::s##_. Meanwhile, _ is not a punctuator. It is considered a regular character in a "text", meaning that your ae_T is seen as an indivisible whole, not as ae followed by _ and followed by T. So T simply disappears in your case. The ## helps you to keep T separate from the surrounding text. – AnT Feb 2 '17 at 9:42

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