0

Is there any way to delete a object from its method.

Let me explain a bit elaborately. I have a JS class called "Test" and I create a new instance of this class and assign it to a variable as below.

var Test = function()
{

}

Test.prototype =  
{
    printLog: function()
    {
        // Print some values
    },

    destroy: function()
    {
      //Here I want to delete **this** Test object.
    }
}

var a = new Test();

Now I want to delete the newly created Test class object which is assigned in variable a by invoking a.destroy as below.

a.destroy();
console.log(a);  //It should print null instead on object code.

After call the destroy() method, variable a value should be printed as null in console log.

  • have you tried to assign null value to the element (this = null;) ? Maybe what I say is stupid but I wonder if it works or not. – AymDev Feb 2 '17 at 10:21
  • 1
    It doesn't, invalid left hand assignment. It only works if you namespace it. – Shilly Feb 2 '17 at 10:22
  • 1
    EcmaScript 6 does not specify any garbage collection semantics at all, so there is nothing like a "destruction" either. Source: stackoverflow.com/questions/29333017/… – Robert Feb 2 '17 at 10:23
  • The easiest way is just not using a method for it and just overwriting the variable a, but you can't do that from within a alas. – Shilly Feb 2 '17 at 10:25
  • I found these 2 questions if it can help: Completely destroy JS object and this one talking about namespace – AymDev Feb 2 '17 at 10:25
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Why don't you simply write a = null; instead of a.destroy(); ??

Inside of your destroy method, you can't use delete this because this isn't a property but an object. And it looks like you can't write this = null; neither. But as I said, I don't really think you need a method for making your object null :)

| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks for your reply. Actually I'm creating a component (example java script window). When the user close a window, close() method will be invoked, from where I have to nullify the object. – Kather Feb 21 '17 at 14:03
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One way you can use the destroy method is by using a namespace AND by hardcoding the variable name and sending both as parameters to destroy. But imho, this makes things just more complicated. So var a = null; is my preferred solution;

But if you opt for the destroy() approach, it's probably better to have the destroy method on the namespace instead of in the prototype of the class.

var Test = function() {

};
Test.prototype = {
    printLog: function() {
        // Print some values
    },

    destroy: function( namespace, instanceName ) {
        namespace[instanceName] = null;
    }
};
var instances = {
    'a' : new Test()
};
console.log(instances);
instances.a.destroy( instances, 'a');
console.log(instances);

///////////////////////////

var Test = function() {};
Test.prototype = {
    printLog: function() {
        // Print some values
    }
};
var Namespace = function() {};
Namespace.prototype = {
    'add' : function( name, obj ) {
        this[name] = obj;
    },
    'destroy' : function( name ) {
        delete this[name];
    }
};
var ns = new Namespace();
ns.add( 'a', new Test() );
console.log(ns);
ns.destroy('a');
console.log(ns);
| improve this answer | |

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