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In this design I need the red background color of each cell partially changed say the first cell 100% second cell 100% and the third cell 50%.

Update: I have made a change where cell's background property is changed from red to

background: linear-gradient(to right, red 50%, white 51%)

but it has one problem that the edge on the right is not sharp and fades out gently blending into the white background, how to avoid that look?

  • Didn't you just link to the answer to your question?.. – mnemosdev Feb 2 '17 at 11:37
  • You still have to do this with the nth-child property and nesting some divs / cells inside their parent div. – mnemosdev Feb 2 '17 at 11:39
  • yes good suggestion I will ask in the comment section there. – Kaizar Laxmidhar Feb 2 '17 at 11:39
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    For a sharp edge, make the white start closer to the end of the red. That is, change 51% to 50% or something closer to 50%. – Harry Feb 2 '17 at 14:59
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    That did the trick! – Kaizar Laxmidhar Feb 2 '17 at 15:29
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Note: There are already few questions regarding hard-stop gradient creation which is why I didn't post my earlier comment as an answer but while searching for a duplicate I figured out there might be a better way to tackle your problem and hence posting the alternate approach as an answer.

Why is there a fade out and blend to white?

Let me get this out of the way before explaining the alternate approach (just for completeness sake). The gradient that you have defined would be interpreted by the UA as follows:

  • Since the first param is to right, the gradient starts at left (that is 0% is at left).
  • From 0% to 50% (that is, from left edge till half way), the color of the gradient is a solid red.
  • Red ends at 50% and white starts only at 51% as per gradient definition and so between 50 - 51% the color slowly changes from red to white (and blends with the white on the other side).
  • From 51% to 100% (that is, from slightly past half way till the right edge), the color is pure white.

This gap between 50% to 51% is generally used for diagonal (or angled) gradients where sharp stops result in jagged (uneven) edges but for normal horizontal or vertical gradients it won't be needed.

Now, I assume that you are trying to change the color stop points like below in order to get partial fill:

background: linear-gradient(to right, red 50%, white 50%); /* for a 50% fill */
background: linear-gradient(to right, red 75%, white 75%); /* for a 75% fill */

But there is a better way to do this than change the color stop points.


What is the better way and why?

A better option would be the one in the below snippet where the color never really changes. Gradient is just a solid red color always but we control it's size/width using background-size property. As you can see in the demo below, this is as effective as changing the color stop points.

This method is more advantageous when you want to animate/transition the background because the background-size is a transitionable property whereas the gradient image's color stop point change is not. You can see what I mean in the below demo. Just hover on each cell and see what happens.

.Row {
  display: table;
  width: 100%;
  table-layout: fixed;
  border-spacing: 10px;
}

.Column {
  display: table-cell;
  background: linear-gradient(red,red); /* use the color you need */
  background-repeat: no-repeat; /* dont change */
  border: 1px solid; /* just to show cell width */
}

.Column:nth-child(1) {
  width:20%;
  background-size: 100% 100%; /* change first value for width change */ 
}
.Column:nth-child(2) {
  width:50%;
  background-size: 75% 100%; /* change first value for width change */
}
.Column:nth-child(3) {
  width:30%;
  background-size: 50% 100%; /* change first value for width change */
}

/* just for demo */

.Column { transition: all 1s; }
.Column:nth-child(1):hover { background-size: 50% 100%; }
.Column:nth-child(2):hover { background-size: 100% 100%; }
.Column:nth-child(3):hover { background-size: 75% 100%; }
<div class="Row">
  <div class="Column">C1</div>
  <div class="Column">C2</div>
  <div class="Column">C3</div>
</div>

How to change direction of the fill?

We can make the fill start from the right hand side of the cell instead of the left hand side by setting the background-position as right to the cells like in the below snippet:

.Row {
  display: table;
  width: 100%;
  table-layout: fixed;
  border-spacing: 10px;
}

.Column {
  display: table-cell;
  background: linear-gradient(red,red); /* use the color you need */
  background-repeat: no-repeat; /* dont change */
  background-position: right;
  border: 1px solid; /* just to show cell width */
}

.Column:nth-child(1) {
  width:20%;
  background-size: 100% 100%; /* change first value for width change */ 
}
.Column:nth-child(2) {
  width:50%;
  background-size: 75% 100%; /* change first value for width change */
}
.Column:nth-child(3) {
  width:30%;
  background-size: 50% 100%; /* change first value for width change */
}

/* just for demo */

.Column { transition: all 1s; }
.Column:nth-child(1):hover { background-size: 50% 100%; }
.Column:nth-child(2):hover { background-size: 100% 100%; }
.Column:nth-child(3):hover { background-size: 75% 100%; }
<div class="Row">
  <div class="Column">C1</div>
  <div class="Column">C2</div>
  <div class="Column">C3</div>
</div>

  • Nice explanation, just wonder what we can do here with gradient can also be done with this approach is to change the direction 'from right' e.g. in the above code cell C2 shows 75% red starting from the left hand side is it possible so that red color starts from the right hand side of the cell? – Kaizar Laxmidhar Feb 3 '17 at 11:53
  • @KaizarLaxmidhar: There you go, I've added a snippet where the fill starts from the right hand side of the cell also into the answer. It is very easy and can be achieved just by setting background-position: right to the cell(s). You can either set it as a common thing for all cells or apply the property only to the cells that need to be filled from the right. – Harry Feb 3 '17 at 12:02
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.Row {
  display: table;
  width: 100%;
  table-layout: fixed;
  border-spacing: 10px;
}

.Column {
  display: table-cell;
  background-color: red;
  background: linear-gradient(to right, red, white);
  
}

.Column:nth-child(1) {
  width:20%;
}
.Column:nth-child(2) {
  width:50%;
}
.Column:nth-child(3) {
  width:30%;
}
<div class="Row">
  <div class="Column">C1</div>
  <div class="Column">C2</div>
  <div class="Column">C3</div>
</div>

Look this

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