1

I was trying to implement a json parser. The input was

"{ \"key\": { \"foo\": \"bar\", \"hello\" : 100 } }"

which I formatted into

"{key:{foo:bar,hello:100}}"

which I then tokenize to get an array like this

["{", "key", ":", "{", "foo", ":", "bar", ",", "hello", ":", "100", "}", "}"]

I may have ignored the , too. Anyway, when I tried to build ruby hash from that array, I get this

{nil=>{"key"=>{"foo"=>"bar", "hello"=>"100"}}}

I don't know how this nil is being used as key. This is the method I'm using to build the hash

def build_hash(arr)
  h = {}
  keys = []
  while arr.size > 0
    current_token = arr.shift
    if alpha?(current_token)
      if keys.empty? # that means a new key is to be expected
        keys << current_token
      else
        h[keys.pop] = current_token
      end
    elsif current_token == '}'
      # these shouldn't be any key left in the keys stack. if there is one, raise error
      # otherwise close the hash and return from method
      if not keys.empty?
        raise_invalid_format_error
      else
        return h
      end
    elsif current_token == ','
      # continue reading. new key will appear. There shouldn't be any key in keys[]
      raise_invalid_format_error unless keys.empty?
    elsif current_token == '{'
      # this means new hash is starting, nested. Should be a value to a key
      # recursive call, assign the result to the existing key
      h[keys.pop] = build_hash(arr)
    end
  end
  h
end

Method alpha? returns true if the character is a letter or digit

def alpha?(s)
  s.match(/\A[[:alnum:]]+\z/)
end

What's going on here?

  • 1
    why not simply: require('json'); JSON.parse("{ \"key\": { \"foo\": \"bar\", \"hello\" : 100 } }"); – Jan Zeiseweis Feb 2 '17 at 13:38
  • @JanZeiseweis Yeah, I knew that. But not using any library was a requirement – Anwar Feb 2 '17 at 13:41
  • Apart from that, you first element is a '{' (I'm not sure what alpha? is doing) but if alpha? returns false, you jump to the last elsif current_token == '{' and since keys is empty, keys.pop returns nil. – Jan Zeiseweis Feb 2 '17 at 13:42
  • @JanZeiseweis oh. I forgot the alpha?, it returns true if it is a letter or a number – Anwar Feb 2 '17 at 13:43
  • In the last elsif you should only do h[keys.pop] = build_hash(arr) only if you keys is not empty ;) – Jan Zeiseweis Feb 2 '17 at 13:48
1

As i described in the comments, only pop a key if there is one:

def build_hash(arr)
  h = {}
  keys = []
  while arr.size > 0
    current_token = arr.shift
    if alpha?(current_token)
      if keys.empty? # that means a new key is to be expected
        keys << current_token
      else
        h[keys.pop] = current_token
      end
    elsif current_token == '}'
      # these shouldn't be any key left in the keys stack. if there is one, raise error
      # otherwise close the hash and return from method
      if not keys.empty?
        raise_invalid_format_error
      else
        return h
      end
    elsif current_token == ','
      # continue reading. new key will appear. There shouldn't be any key in keys[]
      raise_invalid_format_error unless keys.empty?
    elsif current_token == '{'
      # this means new hash is starting, nested. Should be a value to a key
      # recursive call, assign the result to the existing key
      if keys.any?
        h[keys.pop] = build_hash(arr)
      end
    end
  end
  h
end
2

The very first token in your array will be {, which will fall through to your final elsif case:

elsif current_token == '{'
  # this means new hash is starting, nested. Should be a value to a key
  # recursive call, assign the result to the existing key
  h[keys.pop] = ....

The keys array is empty, so pop returns nil, which you use as a key for your hash.

  • Got it now. thanks. upvoted :) I accepted Jan's answer, since he first answered it in comment. – Anwar Feb 2 '17 at 13:53

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