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I am currently working on a program, that can read a set of coordinates from a file forming a contour and then fill it out using the flood fill algorithm.

It seems that the code below runs in an infinite loop, but i can't seem to spot why.

Help or advice is much appreciated :-)

    /* Flood fill */
    TargetColour = 0.0;
    NewColour = 2.0;
    starting_point = 0+slice;

    //Create queue
    queue < int > MyQue;
    //Insert first point into the queue
    MyQue.push(starting_point);

    //While loop for iterating over the nodes.
    while (!MyQue.empty()){
        //Take out the front element
        Node = MyQue.front();
        MyQue.pop();
        tmpSlice[Node] = NewColour;

        //Define the Node directions
        WestNode = Node-1;
        EastNode = Node+1;
        NorthNode = Node-sizes[1];
        SouthNode = Node+sizes[2];


        //East Node
        if (slab[EastNode] == TargetColour && floor((Node-sizes[1]*sizes[2]*floor(Node/(sizes[1]*sizes[2])))/sizes[1]) == floor((EastNode-sizes[1]*sizes[2]*floor(EastNode/(sizes[1]*sizes[2])))/sizes[1])){
            MyQue.push(EastNode);
        }
        //West Node
        if (slab[WestNode] == TargetColour && floor((Node-sizes[1]*sizes[2]*floor(Node/(sizes[1]*sizes[2])))/sizes[1]) == floor((WestNode-sizes[1]*sizes[2]*floor(WestNode/(sizes[1]*sizes[2])))/sizes[1])){
            MyQue.push(WestNode);
        }
        //North Node
        if (slab[NorthNode] == TargetColour && floor(Node / (sizes[1]*sizes[2])) == floor(NorthNode / (sizes[1]*sizes[2]))){
            MyQue.push(NorthNode);
        }
        //South Node
        if (slab[SouthNode] == TargetColour && floor(Node / (sizes[1]*sizes[2])) == floor(SouthNode / (sizes[1]*sizes[2]))){
            MyQue.push(SouthNode);
        }
    }
  • 2
    What does this code have to do with medical datasets? – Thomas Matthews Feb 2 '17 at 16:32
  • What happens if you feed the data a very small dataset? (Perhaps a triangle). Does it terminate then? Are you sure you haven't got an infinite loop rather than a performance problem? – Martin Bonner Feb 2 '17 at 17:01
  • 2
    A vector<vector<double> is almost always a terrible data structure. Try typedef array<double,3> Coordinate; vector<Coordinate> instead. (It will be vastly more cache friendly, and use about 1/3 the memory). – Martin Bonner Feb 2 '17 at 17:06
  • @ThomasMatthews - The program is used to run over PET Scans, and i thought that because it did not terminate it was because of poor performance and the large dataset. – Joachim Hansen Feb 7 '17 at 13:38
  • Are you sure the tmpSlice is actually writing the new colour to the target? Also, it's not a very efficient algorithm. You get large numbers of duplicated points in the queue doing it that way. – Malcolm McLean Feb 7 '17 at 13:43
2

I'm partly sure that your algorithm is actually terminating, but only after a very long time (assuming there is enough memory for the queue). I'd need more details on the values of sizes to be completely sure.

Lets play a little 3x3 example field and assume that the whole floor((Node-sizes[1]*sizes[2]*floor(Node/(sizes[1]*sizes[2])))/sizes[1]) is just a boundary check (what is it?).

Field (numbers are the position names):

1 2 3
4 5 6
7 8 9

Assume starting_point = 1

  1. MyQue = { 1 }
    • visit 1, add 2 and 4 to MyQue
  2. MyQue = { 2, 4 }
    • visit 2, add 3 and 5 to MyQue
  3. MyQue = { 4, 3, 5 }
    • visit 4, add 5 and 7 to MyQue
  4. MyQue = { 3, 5, 5, 7 }
    • visit 3, add 6 to MyQue
  5. MyQue = { 5, 5, 7, 6 }
    • visit 5, add 6 and 8 to MyQue
  6. MyQue = { 5, 7, 6, 6, 8 }
    • visit 5, add 6 and 8 to MyQue
  7. MyQue = { 7, 6, 6, 8, 6, 8 }
    • visit 7, add 8 to MyQue
  8. MyQue = { 6, 6, 8, 6, 8, 8 }
    • visit 6, add 9 to MyQue
  9. MyQue = { 6, 8, 6, 8, 8, 9 }
    • visit 6, add 9 to MyQue
  10. MyQue = { 8, 6, 8, 8, 9, 9 }
    • visit 8, add 9 to MyQue
  11. MyQue = { 6, 8, 8, 9, 9, 9 }
    • visit 6, add 9 to MyQue
  12. MyQue = { 8, 8, 9, 9, 9, 9 }
    • visit 8, add 9 to MyQue
  13. MyQue = { 8, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9 }
    • visit 8, add 9 to MyQue
  14. MyQue = { 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9 }
    • visit 9
  15. MyQue = { 9, 9, 9, 9, 9 }
    • visit 9
  16. MyQue = { 9, 9, 9, 9 }
    • visit 9
  17. MyQue = { 9, 9, 9 }
    • visit 9
  18. MyQue = { 9, 9 }
    • visit 9
  19. MyQue = { 9 }
    • visit 9

I hope this illustrates how the algorithm is going to repeat the same thing very often even for a small field - this effect will increase for bigger field sizes.

So what you can do is ensure that each node is only queued once. I think the evaluation order doesn't really matter, so instead of a queue you can use a set to store the working set. This will ensure that each number is only queued once at the same time.

You can also combine queue and set so you keep evaluation order.

set < int > marker;
queue < int > MyQue;

// ... replace later in code
// MyQue.push(SomeNode);
// by
if (marker.insert(SomeNode).second) {
    MyQue.push(SomeNode);
}

Edit: changed the if condition a bit. marker.insert(SomeNode).second will be true if SomeNode was inserted and false if SomeNode was already part of the set.

  • Thanks for the really awesome and understandable example made it a whole lot easier to understand and i think you are correct about where the problem lies. – Joachim Hansen Feb 7 '17 at 15:20
  • For clarification the whole floor is for boundary check and the sizes are 400 * 400. After editing the code to match your changes the code runs for 160001 iterations, and produces a Segmentation fault (core dumped). The obvious thing is i have only allocated a 400*400 array but it seems to surpass that. – Joachim Hansen Feb 7 '17 at 15:21
  • Well your whole floor thing made me very suspicious but my head started to hurt when I tried to understand what you do there, so I stopped :P. If you think you need this kind of calculation, just add a boundary check (regarding the array index, not your logical boundaries) before your push and break if boundaries are violated. Then look at all your values and understand why it's calculating something wrong. – grek40 Feb 7 '17 at 15:24

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