27

I'm having trouble accessing a webpack bundled library from the browser.

Example: I have a class Foo

// foo.js

"use strict";

export default class Foo {
  constructor() {
    var bar = "bar";
  }
}

Foo is imported in src.js

// src.js

"use strict";
import Foo from "./foo.js";

The webpack config looks like this. The entry is src.js and the output file is bundle.js.

// webpack.config.js

module.exports = {
  entry: './src.js',
  output: {
    path: '.',
    filename: 'bundle.js',
  },
  module: {
    loaders: [
      {
        test: /\.js$/,
        exclude: /node_modules/,
        loader: 'babel-loader',
        query: {
          presets: ['es2015']
        }
      },
    ]
  },
};

Webpack compiles everything okay, and I'm able to load it into my HTML file.

<!-- index.html -->

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
  <script src="bundle.js"></script>
  <script type="text/javascript">
    var x = new Foo();
    console.log(x);
  </script>
</head>
<body>
</body>
</html>

it's at this point that I'm getting the error. For some reason, the bundled JS doesn't put the Foo class into a namespace the browser is able to access.

This is the error I get in Firefox:

ReferenceError: Foo is not defined[Learn More]

There's some configuration in WebPack I'm not grokking, I'm sure of it, but I've so far not been able to figure it out.

8
  • this is by design.
    – Claies
    Feb 2, 2017 at 22:40
  • 4
    @Claies It's by design that I can't access the classes I want to include in the bundle? Then what's the point of webpack?
    – samullen
    Feb 3, 2017 at 15:23
  • 3
    Okay, but I'm not seeing anywhere in the documentation, blog posts, or the answers below that explain how to get at the code I'm writing. I need to get to Foo() somehow and nothing's explaining how to do that. Just that I'm doing it wrong.
    – samullen
    Feb 3, 2017 at 15:32
  • 2
    if inside src.js you were to write code that consumed that import, it would function properly and you wouldn't have any ReferenceError. However, classes are not natively supported by the browser; support is added via babel. But, babel doesn't transpile your <script> tags. if you want to use that class in <script> tags, then exporting it to the global namespace is your only option. This isn't something that is natively just "done" by WebPack, and not normally good programming practice anyway.
    – Claies
    Feb 3, 2017 at 15:38
  • 2
    @sammullen don't feel bad - I had EXACTLY the same problem. The whole reason we are trying to use webpack is to access modules from within my browser. As far as I can see, no answer has been provided. A simple example would be nice. (Yeah, yeah, I get the "pollute the global namespace" problem, but given that JS isn't even strongly typed, why do people worry so much about that?)
    – Duncan
    Mar 26, 2019 at 20:23

3 Answers 3

42

To make this code re-usable, you need to tell webpack you are authoring a Library.

From the webpack documentation:

To make your library available for reuse, add library property in webpack configuration.

To create your library, make the following change:

module.exports = {
  entry: './src.js',
  output: {
    path: '.',
    filename: 'bundle.js',
    library: 'fooLibrary', //add this line to enable re-use
  },
...

In order to use the library, you can then reference it in your other scripts:

<script type="text/javascript">
  var x = new fooLibrary.Foo();
  console.log(x);
</script>
1
  • 3
    in order to use library you must build it in production , stop dev server press ctrl + C and enter webpack -p (build for production
    – user889030
    Dec 28, 2017 at 6:58
2

Looks like 'var' is the default for output.libraryTarget therefore you should be able to define your output.library property and you will be able to access the var globally. https://webpack.js.org/configuration/output/#output-librarytarget

0
1

One of the major advantages of Webpack and ES2015 modules is that it stops polluting the global namespace by default.

Because of this, if you want to publish something on the global object, you have to do it explicitly. I recommend namespacing your classes to something unique to the application or company, so you don't risk a naming collision with anything else.

1
  • 8
    I don't want to pollute the namespace – that's why I made a class – I'm just trying to figure out how to get access to that class. I can't find anything in the docs for how to do that.
    – samullen
    Feb 3, 2017 at 15:17

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