20

I have created two web applications - client and service apps.
The interaction between client and service apps goes fine when they are deployed in same Tomcat instance.
But when the apps are deployed into seperate Tomcat instances (different machines), I get the below error when request to sent service app.

Response to preflight request doesn't pass access control check: No 'Access-Control-Allow-Origin' header is present on the requested resource. 
Origin 'http://localhost:8080' is therefore not allowed access. The response had HTTP status code 401

My Client application uses JQuery, HTML5 and Bootstrap.

AJAX call is made to service as shown below:

var auth = "Basic " + btoa({usname} + ":" + {password});
var service_url = {serviceAppDomainName}/services;

if($("#registrationForm").valid()){
    var formData = JSON.stringify(getFormData(registrationForm));
    $.ajax({
        url: service_url+action,
        dataType: 'json',
        async: false,
        type: 'POST',
        headers:{
            "Authorization":auth
        },
        contentType: 'application/json',
        data: formData,
        success: function(data){
            //success code
        },
        error: function( jqXhr, textStatus, errorThrown ){
            alert( errorThrown );
        });
}

My service application uses Spring MVC, Spring Data JPA and Spring Security.

I have included CorsConfiguration class as shown below:

CORSConfig.java:

@Configuration
@EnableWebMvc
public class CORSConfig extends WebMvcConfigurerAdapter  {
    @Override
    public void addCorsMappings(CorsRegistry registry) {
        registry.addMapping("*");
    }
}

SecurityConfig.java:

@Configuration
@EnableGlobalMethodSecurity(prePostEnabled = true)
@EnableWebSecurity
@ComponentScan(basePackages = "com.services", scopedProxy = ScopedProxyMode.INTERFACES)
public class SecurityConfig extends WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter {

    @Autowired
    @Qualifier("authenticationService")
    private UserDetailsService userDetailsService;

    @Bean
    @Override
    public AuthenticationManager authenticationManagerBean() throws Exception {
        return super.authenticationManagerBean();
    }

    @Override
    protected void configure(AuthenticationManagerBuilder auth) throws Exception {
        auth.userDetailsService(userDetailsService);
        auth.authenticationProvider(authenticationProvider());
    }

    @Override
    protected void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {
       http
                .authorizeRequests()
                .antMatchers("/login").permitAll()
                .anyRequest().fullyAuthenticated();
        http.httpBasic();
        http.sessionManagement().sessionCreationPolicy(SessionCreationPolicy.STATELESS);
        http.csrf().disable();
    }

    @Bean
    public PasswordEncoder passwordEncoder() {
        return new BCryptPasswordEncoder();
    }

    @Bean
    public DaoAuthenticationProvider authenticationProvider() {
        DaoAuthenticationProvider authenticationProvider = new DaoAuthenticationProvider();
        authenticationProvider.setUserDetailsService(userDetailsService);
        authenticationProvider.setPasswordEncoder(passwordEncoder());
        return authenticationProvider;
    }
}

Spring Security dependencies:

 <dependency>
            <groupId>org.springframework.security</groupId>
            <artifactId>spring-security-config</artifactId>
            <version>3.2.3.RELEASE</version>
</dependency>
<dependency>
            <groupId>org.springframework.security</groupId>
            <artifactId>spring-security-web</artifactId>
            <version>3.2.3.RELEASE</version>
</dependency>

I am using Apache Tomcat server for deployment.

0
18

CORS' preflight request uses HTTP OPTIONS without credentials, see Cross-Origin Resource Sharing:

Otherwise, make a preflight request. Fetch the request URL from origin source origin using referrer source as override referrer source with the manual redirect flag and the block cookies flag set, using the method OPTIONS, and with the following additional constraints:

  • Include an Access-Control-Request-Method header with as header field value the request method (even when that is a simple method).
  • If author request headers is not empty include an Access-Control-Request-Headers header with as header field value a comma-separated list of the header field names from author request headers in lexicographical order, each converted to ASCII lowercase (even when one or more are a simple header).
  • Exclude the author request headers.
  • Exclude user credentials.
  • Exclude the request entity body.

You have to allow anonymous access for HTTP OPTIONS.

Spring Security 3

Your modified (and simplified) code:

@Override
protected void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {
   http
       .authorizeRequests()
           .antMatchers(HttpMethod.OPTIONS, "/**").permitAll()
           .antMatchers("/login").permitAll()
           .anyRequest().fullyAuthenticated()
           .and()
       .httpBasic()
           .and()
       .sessionManagement()
           .sessionCreationPolicy(SessionCreationPolicy.STATELESS)
           .and()
       .csrf().disable();
}

You still need your CORS configuration (probably with some additional values):

@Configuration
@EnableWebMvc
public class CORSConfig extends WebMvcConfigurerAdapter  {
    @Override
    public void addCorsMappings(CorsRegistry registry) {
        registry.addMapping("*");
    }
}

Spring Security 4

Since Spring Security 4.2.0 you can use the built-in support, see Spring Security Reference:

19. CORS

Spring Framework provides first class support for CORS. CORS must be processed before Spring Security because the pre-flight request will not contain any cookies (i.e. the JSESSIONID). If the request does not contain any cookies and Spring Security is first, the request will determine the user is not authenticated (since there are no cookies in the request) and reject it.

The easiest way to ensure that CORS is handled first is to use the CorsFilter. Users can integrate the CorsFilter with Spring Security by providing a CorsConfigurationSource using the following:

@EnableWebSecurity
public class WebSecurityConfig extends WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter {

  @Override
  protected void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {
      http
          // by default uses a Bean by the name of corsConfigurationSource
          .cors().and()
          ...
  }

  @Bean
  CorsConfigurationSource corsConfigurationSource() {
      CorsConfiguration configuration = new CorsConfiguration();
      configuration.setAllowedOrigins(Arrays.asList("https://example.com"));
      configuration.setAllowedMethods(Arrays.asList("GET","POST"));
      UrlBasedCorsConfigurationSource source = new UrlBasedCorsConfigurationSource();
      source.registerCorsConfiguration("/**", configuration);
      return source;
  }
}
2
  • .andMatchers(HttpMethod.OPTIONS, "/**").permitAll() never worked for me, it didn't give the proper CORS headers on OPTIONS. Only the Spring Security-approved CORS technique works. – Hendy Irawan Apr 22 '17 at 12:38
  • 3
    Still getting CORS-Error when trying this solution: [...] has been blocked by CORS policy: Response to preflight request doesn't pass access control check: No 'Access-Control-Allow-Origin' header is present on the requested resource. – Vortilion Mar 21 '19 at 12:05
16

Since Spring Security 4.1, this is the proper way to make Spring Security support CORS (also needed in Spring Boot 1.4/1.5):

@Configuration
public class WebConfig extends WebMvcConfigurerAdapter {

    @Override
    public void addCorsMappings(CorsRegistry registry) {
        registry.addMapping("/**")
                .allowedMethods("HEAD", "GET", "PUT", "POST", "DELETE", "PATCH");
    }
}

and:

@Configuration
public class SecurityConfig extends WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter {
    @Override
    protected void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {
//        http.csrf().disable();
        http.cors();
    }

    @Bean
    public CorsConfigurationSource corsConfigurationSource() {
        final CorsConfiguration configuration = new CorsConfiguration();
        configuration.setAllowedOrigins(ImmutableList.of("*"));
        configuration.setAllowedMethods(ImmutableList.of("HEAD",
                "GET", "POST", "PUT", "DELETE", "PATCH"));
        // setAllowCredentials(true) is important, otherwise:
        // The value of the 'Access-Control-Allow-Origin' header in the response must not be the wildcard '*' when the request's credentials mode is 'include'.
        configuration.setAllowCredentials(true);
        // setAllowedHeaders is important! Without it, OPTIONS preflight request
        // will fail with 403 Invalid CORS request
        configuration.setAllowedHeaders(ImmutableList.of("Authorization", "Cache-Control", "Content-Type"));
        final UrlBasedCorsConfigurationSource source = new UrlBasedCorsConfigurationSource();
        source.registerCorsConfiguration("/**", configuration);
        return source;
    }
}

Do not do any of below, which are the wrong way to attempt solving the problem:

  • http.authorizeRequests().antMatchers(HttpMethod.OPTIONS, "/**").permitAll();
  • web.ignoring().antMatchers(HttpMethod.OPTIONS);

Reference: http://docs.spring.io/spring-security/site/docs/4.2.x/reference/html/cors.html

4
  • Worked for me, but I had to use http.csrf().disable() because iOS and Android Apps would be blocked when not enabled. Now both is working WEB and Mobile. – Markus G. Apr 16 '19 at 8:09
  • Thank you! this solved my issue! In particular, it was adding configuration.setAllowedHeaders(ImmutableList.of("Authorization", "Cache-Control", "Content-Type")); that I was missing. – Abraham Ciokler Mar 25 '20 at 20:45
  • For Spring 5+ replace extends WebMvcConfigurerAdapter with implements WebMvcConfigurer. (see baeldung.com/web-mvc-configurer-adapter-deprecated for an explanation). Also, I used Arrays.asList instead of ImmutableList. – ponder275 Jun 11 '20 at 21:11
  • Why is the first configuration necessary when we have the identical second one? – GalAbra Apr 12 at 12:44
1

In my case, I have Resource Server with OAuth security enabled and any of above solutions didn't work. After some debugging and googling figured why.

@Bean
public FilterRegistrationBean corsFilter() {
    UrlBasedCorsConfigurationSource source = new UrlBasedCorsConfigurationSource();
    CorsConfiguration config = new CorsConfiguration();
    config.setAllowCredentials(true);
    config.addAllowedOrigin("*");
    config.addAllowedHeader("*");
    config.addAllowedMethod("*");
    source.registerCorsConfiguration("/**", config);
    FilterRegistrationBean bean = new FilterRegistrationBean(new CorsFilter(source));
    bean.setOrder(Ordered.HIGHEST_PRECEDENCE);
    return bean;
}

Basically in this example Ordered.HIGHEST_PRECEDENCE is key!

https://github.com/spring-projects/spring-security-oauth/issues/938

Various pom dependencies add different kinds of filters and therefore we could have issues based on order.

0

Since none of this posted examples helped me, I've taken things in my own knowledge. Usually the most complicated bugs happen always to me. So this is how I managed this bug.

In this method:

@Bean
CorsConfigurationSource corsConfigurationSource() {
    CorsConfiguration cors = new CorsConfiguration();
    cors.setAllowedMethods(Arrays.asList("POST", "GET", "PUT", "HEAD", "DELETE"));
    UrlBasedCorsConfigurationSource source = new
            UrlBasedCorsConfigurationSource();
    source.registerCorsConfiguration("/**", new CorsConfiguration().applyPermitDefaultValues());
    return source;
}

CorsConfiguration by default have allowed method: POST, HEAD, GET, so PUT, DELETE WILL NOT WORK! What I did is I create new instance of CorsConfiguration and set allowed methods:

cors.setAllowedMethods(Arrays.asList("POST", "GET", "PUT", "HEAD", "DELETE"));

so now my method looks like:

    @Bean
    CorsConfigurationSource corsConfigurationSource() {
        CorsConfiguration cors = new CorsConfiguration();
        cors.setAllowedMethods(Arrays.asList("POST", "GET", "PUT", "HEAD", "DELETE"));
        UrlBasedCorsConfigurationSource source = new
                UrlBasedCorsConfigurationSource();
        source.registerCorsConfiguration("/**", cors.applyPermitDefaultValues());
        return source;
    }

and it works like charm. I hope it will help somebody. Of course, all other configuration is made by spring.io documentation

0

Try this:

import org.springframework.boot.web.servlet.FilterRegistrationBean;
import org.springframework.context.annotation.Bean;
import org.springframework.core.Ordered;
import org.springframework.stereotype.Component;
import org.springframework.web.cors.CorsConfiguration;
import org.springframework.web.cors.UrlBasedCorsConfigurationSource;
import org.springframework.web.filter.CorsFilter;

import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.List;

@Component
public class CorsFilterConfig {

    public static final List<String> allowedOrigins = Arrays.asList("*");

    @Bean
    public FilterRegistrationBean<CorsFilter> initCorsFilter() {
        // @formatter:off
        UrlBasedCorsConfigurationSource source = new UrlBasedCorsConfigurationSource();
        CorsConfiguration config = new CorsConfiguration();
        config.setAllowCredentials(true);
        config.setAllowedHeaders(Arrays.asList("Authorization", "Cache-Control", "Content-Type"));
        config.addAllowedMethod("*");
        config.setAllowedOrigins(allowedOrigins);
        source.registerCorsConfiguration("/**", config);
        FilterRegistrationBean<CorsFilter> bean = new FilterRegistrationBean<>(new CorsFilter(source));
        bean.setOrder(Ordered.HIGHEST_PRECEDENCE);
        return bean;
        // @formatter:on
    }
}
-1

This worked for: spring-boot-starter-parent 2.2.6.RELEASE

@Configuration
@EnableWebMvc
public class WebConfig implements WebMvcConfigurer {

    @Override
    public void addCorsMappings(CorsRegistry registry) {
        registry.addMapping("/**").allowedOrigins("*").allowedHeaders("*").allowedMethods("*");
    }
}

Change "*" to something meaningful in prod

1
  • 1
    This won't work if you use Spring Security. – wonsuc Jan 12 at 1:24
-1

Add the below configuration in main application. It worked me in spring boot application 2.3.1

package com.example.restservicecors;

import org.springframework.boot.SpringApplication;
import org.springframework.boot.autoconfigure.SpringBootApplication;
import org.springframework.context.annotation.Bean;
import org.springframework.web.servlet.config.annotation.CorsRegistry;
import org.springframework.web.servlet.config.annotation.WebMvcConfigurer;

@SpringBootApplication
public class RestServiceCorsApplication {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        SpringApplication.run(RestServiceCorsApplication.class, args);
    }

    @Bean
    public WebMvcConfigurer corsConfigurer() {
        return new WebMvcConfigurer() {
            @Override
            public void addCorsMappings(CorsRegistry registry) {
                registry.addMapping("/**").allowedOrigins("*").allowedHeaders("*").allowedMethods("*");
            }
        };
    }

}

Reference source: https://spring.io/guides/gs/rest-service-cors/

3
  • 2
    This won't work if you use Spring Security. – wonsuc Jan 12 at 1:24
  • 2
    The reference source only explains when it's without Spring Security. – wonsuc Jan 12 at 6:36
  • now I understand your question, yes above answer without security. Use this option, if you use spring security stackoverflow.com/questions/63884056/… – Sathia Jan 12 at 6:45

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