7

I have a file with the following structure:

1486113768 3656
1486113768 6280
1486113769 530912
1486113769 5629824
1486113770 5122176
1486113772 3565920
1486113772 530912
1486113773 9229920
1486113774 4020960
1486113774 4547928

My goal is to get rid of duplicate values in the first columns, sum the values in the second columns and update the row with new columns value: a working output, from the input above, would be:

1486113768 9936      # 3656 + 6280
1486113769 6160736   # 530912 + 5629824
1486113770 5122176   # ...
1486113772 4096832
1486113773 9229920
1486113774 8568888

I know cut, uniq: until now I managed to find the duplicate values in first columns with:

cut -d " " -f 1 file.log | uniq -d

1486113768
1486113769
1486113772
1486113774

Is there a "awk way" to achieve my goal? I know it is very powerful and terse tool: I used it earlier with

awk '{print $2 " " $3 >> $1".log"}' log.txt

to scan all rows in log.txt and create a .log file with $1 as name, and filling it with $2 and $3 values, all in one bash line (to hell with read loop!); is there a way to find first column duplicates, sum its second column values and rewrite the row removing the duplicates and printing the resulting sum of second column?

5
  • 1
    That awk script you used previously should be written as awk '{print $2, $3 > ($1".log")}' log.txt for portability, robustness, maintainability, etc.
    – Ed Morton
    Commented Feb 3, 2017 at 15:39
  • 1
    Lot of good reasons to do it: thank you, I'll correct it right away.
    – elmazzun
    Commented Feb 3, 2017 at 15:43
  • You're welcome. Going forward - when you post a question its a good idea to wait a few hours before accepting an answer rather than just accepting the first answer you get as once you accept an answer it discourages anyone else from even looking at your question and that first answer might not be the best one you could get.
    – Ed Morton
    Commented Feb 3, 2017 at 15:50
  • I apologise, I was in a rush to get my plot work and I accepted the first working answer without considering space and time performance. Your answer seems more performing than the accepted one.
    – elmazzun
    Commented Feb 3, 2017 at 16:13
  • @elmazzun, you are allowed to change your pick for best answer. :)
    – ghoti
    Commented Nov 5, 2018 at 6:43

5 Answers 5

15

Use an Awk as below,

awk '{ seen[$1] += $2 } END { for (i in seen) print i, seen[i] }' file1
1486113768 9936
1486113769 6160736
1486113770 5122176
1486113772 4096832
1486113773 9229920
1486113774 8568888

{seen[$1]+=$2} creates a hash-map with the $1 being treated as the index value and the sum is incremented only for those unique items from $1 in the file.

2
  • Smart and fast, thank you. I just needed to pipe a sort after awk, for very large files it was not sorted by first colum like before.
    – elmazzun
    Commented Feb 3, 2017 at 12:42
  • 2
    @elmazzun no you don't. You'd only need to pipe the output to sort because this is the wrong approach as it reads the whole file into memory and then prints the output in random order. You simply don't need to do that.
    – Ed Morton
    Commented Feb 3, 2017 at 15:41
7
$ awk '$1!=p{ if (NR>1) print p, s; p=$1; s=0} {s+=$2} END{print p, s}' file
1486113768 9936
1486113769 6160736
1486113770 5122176
1486113772 4096832
1486113773 9229920
1486113774 8568888

The above uses almost no memory (just 1 string and 1 integer variables) and will print the output in the same order it appeared in your input.

I highly recommend you read the book Effective Awk Programming, 5th Edition, by Arnold Robbins if you're going to be using awk both so you can learn how to write your own scripts and (while you're learning) so you can understand other peoples scripts well enough to separate the right from the wrong approaches given 2 scripts that produce the expected output given some specific sample input.

4
  • See a free copy at Gawk: Effective AWK Programming
    – toraritte
    Commented Nov 19, 2021 at 16:39
  • @toraritte please stop posting that. Arnold who provides GNU awk and writes the documentation and provides that online copy free for reference ONLY gets paid from sales of the book for all of the work puts in to support the rest of us. Direct people to buy the book, not download it for free.
    – Ed Morton
    Commented Nov 19, 2021 at 16:44
  • This doesn't work for me with GNU Awk 5.1.0, API: 3.0 whereas the accepted answer does (albeit, I would prefer this approach because I have a humongous CSV).
    – toraritte
    Commented Nov 19, 2021 at 16:58
  • @toraritte This doesn't work is the worst possible problem statement as it contains no information that would let anyone help you debug it. Imagine taking your car to the mechanic and just saying "it doesn't work" and expecting them to fix it. As you can see in my answer it produces the expected output from the posted sample input so without any more information all I can suggest is that if it "doesn't work" for you then you did something wrong copy/pasting the script or your input doesn't look like the input in this question. You should probably ask a new question so we can help you.
    – Ed Morton
    Commented Nov 19, 2021 at 17:01
3

If datamash is okay

$ datamash -t' ' -g 1 sum 2 < ip.txt 
1486113768 9936
1486113769 6160736
1486113770 5122176
1486113772 4096832
1486113773 9229920
1486113774 8568888
  • -t' ' set space as field delimiter
  • -g 1 group by 1st field
  • sum 2 sum 2nd field values
  • if the input file is not sorted, use datamash -st' ' -g 1 sum 2 where the -s option takes care of sorting
1
  • 1
    good one, whoever uses it please make sure your data is sorted by first field Commented Nov 1, 2018 at 17:36
0

Say you have a top ten lines from many log files output concatened in one file (and sorted with 'sort') with that kind of results :

   2142 /pathtofile1/00.jpg
   2173 /pathtofile1/00.jpg
   2100 /pathtofile1/00.jpg
   2127 /pathtofile1/00.jpg

you can also change the order of sum:

$ awk '{ seen[$2] += $1 } END { for (i in seen) print i, seen[i] }' top10s.txt | sort -k 2 -rn

and you'll get that total:

/pathtofile1/00.jpg 8542
0

Using Perl

$ cat elmazzun.log
1486113768 3656
1486113768 6280
1486113769 530912
1486113769 5629824
1486113770 5122176
1486113772 3565920
1486113772 530912
1486113773 9229920
1486113774 4020960
1486113774 4547928
$ perl -lane ' $kv{$F[0]}+=$F[1];END { print "$_ $kv{$_}" for (sort keys %kv)}' elmazzun.log
1486113768 9936
1486113769 6160736
1486113770 5122176
1486113772 4096832
1486113773 9229920
1486113774 8568888
$

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