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I am trying to calculate the median of a sorted array of numbers in C++ and I was wondering if there is a built in function in the C++ library that does this.

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There's no need to use a function. To find the median of a list with an odd number of items, just do

cout << sortedArray[size/2];

where sortedArray is the array and size is the size of the array. For an array with an even number, you should just do something like this

cout << (sortedArray[size/2] + sortedArray[(size/2) - 1])/2

In other words, take the average of the n/2 element and the n/2-1 element.

If you don't know the size, you need to loop through the array and count how many elements there are. Doing it with decimals is irrelevant because the size of an array is always a whole number.

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    What if there's an even number of elements? You'd want to take the average of the two in the middle. e.g. median of 2 4 6 8 should be 5. – Greg Kikola Feb 3 '17 at 22:03
  • You're right. Editing now – Gab Feb 3 '17 at 22:04
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    For the second case, I think you want size/2 - 1 and size/2 as the indices. – Greg Kikola Feb 3 '17 at 22:09
  • Ok, although what should I use to declare size? I am getting an error that says size wan't declared in this scope. – user5858639 Feb 3 '17 at 22:13
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    The principle of this answer is great - but do be aware of the possibility of integer overflow when computing the semi-sum when the values are very large. Have a look at Salvatore Ruggieri's paper for some robust algorithms. – Toby Speight Jan 17 '18 at 9:23
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If you know the size of the sorted array, you can compute its median in O(1). When the size is unknown (is it a linked list or what?), then counting the median would take O(n) on a classical computer.

  • You should elaborate on how it's O(n)... – Charles Feb 3 '17 at 22:32
  • Scan the list left-to-right moving the pointer to current median twice slower? – bipll Feb 7 '17 at 22:16

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