63

in this scenario:

async def foo(f):
    async def wrapper(*args, **kwargs):
        return f(*args, **kwargs)
    return wrapper

@foo
async def boo(*args, **kwargs):
    pass

is the call to foo as a decorator for boo decorator an async call?

--First Edit: Also how does one handle calling chain of coroutines as decorators?

1
  • 4
    That code doesn't make any sense. After it runs, boo is a coroutine object (not a coroutine function). It's not at all useful to have use async def for a decorator. For wrapper it could make sense (though you'd probably want to yield from f(...)), but not for foo itself.
    – Blckknght
    Feb 4, 2017 at 18:07

5 Answers 5

80

Thanks to @blacknght's comment, considering

def foo():
    def wrapper(func):
        @functools.wraps(func)
        async def wrapped(*args):
             # Some fancy foo stuff
            return await func(*args)
        return wrapped
    return wrapper

and

def boo():
    def wrapper(func):
        @functools.wraps(func)
        async def wrapped(*args):
            # Some fancy boo stuff
            return await func(*args)
        return wrapped
    return wrapper

as two decorators, and

@foo()
@boo()
async def work(*args):
    pass

As the foo is wrapping the work coroutine, the key is to await the func(*arg) in both decorators.

8
  • 3
    Nice solution! I found that you don't need the outer def. For example, if you removed def foo() and return wrapper from the first example, then decorating with @wrapper (no parens) would have the same effect.
    – alan
    Nov 6, 2018 at 21:32
  • 2
    You also don't need async and await in wrapped, unless you manipulate the return value. Otherwise, you just add an overhead of a task waiting for another task. Not using async also gives the advantage of being able to use the same decorator in normal functions as well. The only advantage of having async with a single return await is to make it clearly documented the function must be awaited, but that doesn't matter in a decorator wrapper. Jan 24, 2019 at 9:10
  • 1
    @AndréSassi if you return a normal function instead of a coroutine, it might or not have the intended consequences: the code might execute before the awaited function, or in another thread. See this discussion for more details: forum.dabeaz.com/t/…
    – ashwoods
    Feb 9, 2020 at 10:36
  • 2
    Thanks a lot, really helpful, you can add arguments to foo and boo to pass parameters in the decorator. Apr 7, 2020 at 21:13
  • @AndréSassi this is exactly what i want to do. I want to have a single decorator that works for both async as well as normal function. I didn't used async/await for decorator but when i called it for async functions, it throws error, something like coroutine object is not iterable/callable. How to write decorators for both async as well as normal/sync functions?
    – y_159
    Feb 14, 2022 at 23:16
44
def foo(f):
    async def wrapper(*args, **kwargs):
        return await f(*args, **kwargs)
    return wrapper

@foo
async def boo(*args, **kwargs):
    pass

Your decorator needs to be a normal function and it will work fine.

When a decorator is evaluated python executes the method with the function as the argument.

@foo
async def boo():
    pass

Evaluates to:

__main__.boo = foo(boo)

If foo is an async function type(main.boo) will be a coroutine object, not a function object. But if foo is a regular synch function it will evaluate right away and main.boo will be the wrapper returned.

1
  • IMHO this solution is way better than accepted answer
    – 555Russich
    Dec 28, 2022 at 19:57
3

Here is an alternate approach using the decorator library (i.e. pip install decorator first):

import asyncio

import decorator


@decorator.decorator
async def decorate_coro(coro, *args, **kwargs):
    try:
        res = await coro(*args, **kwargs)
    except Exception as e:
        print(e)
    else:
        print(res)


@decorate_coro
async def f():
    return 42


@decorate_coro
async def g():
    return 1 / 0


async def main():
    return await asyncio.gather(f(), g())

if __name__ == '__main__':
    asyncio.run(main())

Output:

42
division by zero
0
async def foo(f):
  def wrapper(*args, **kwargs):
    # wrapper pre-function stuff
    result = await f(*args, **kwargs) # key is to await function's result
    # wrapper post-function stuff
    return result 
  wrapper.__name__ = f.__name__ # for some reason, async wrappers don't do this
  # do it to avoid an error if you use the wrapper on multiple functions
  return wrapper

The two key changes are to await the function you are wrapping, as it is an async function, and to change the name of the wrapper function so your program isn't trying to name multiple functions the same thing.

0

A decorator that works for both sync and async functions:

from inspect import iscoroutinefunction
from functools import wraps

def my_decorator(decorator_option=None):
    def decorator(f):
        def shared_logic(*args, **kwargs):
            # Do something with decorator_option, if relevant
            pass

        @wraps(f)
        def wrapper(*args, **kwargs):
            shared_logic(*args, **kwargs)
            return f(*args, **kwargs)

        @wraps(f)
        async def async_wrapper(*args, **kwargs):
            shared_logic(*args, **kwargs)
            return await f(*args, **kwargs)

        return async_wrapper if iscoroutinefunction(f) else wrapper
    return decorator

If the decorator doesn't take any args, the outer function can be removed.

1
  • I think you should await shared_logic() in your async wrapper. Dec 5, 2023 at 9:16

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