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I'm new to Rust. As a learning exercise I'm trying to write a simple timer struct that I once wrote in C++. The interface and implementation looks something like this:

pub struct Timer {
    handle: Option<std::thread::JoinHandle<()>>,
    alive: bool,
}

impl Timer {
    pub fn new() {
        Timer {
            handle: None,
            alive: false,
        }
    }

    pub fn start(&'static mut self) {
        // Oops! How do I do this?
        self.handle = Some(std::thread::spawn(move || {
            self.alive = true;
            self.loop()
        }));
    }

    pub fn stop(&mut self) {
        self.alive = false;
        self.handle.unwrap().join()
    }

    pub fn loop(&self) {
        // while alive
    }
}

I understand why this is an error because of use of moved value: self within the start function, but I'm wondering how I'm supposed to design my struct so that something like this would work. In every scenario I can think of, I'll always have a double borrow situation.

I have a hunch that I need to learn more about interior mutability, but figured I would ask for design guidance before going down any more rabbit holes.

  • Your struct definition and impl do not line up. In the definition it has one member (handle) and in the implementation of new it has two members (thread and alive). I kinda guess what it should be, but it'd be better if they matched what you have in your code. – Matthieu M. Feb 4 '17 at 18:20
  • I'll work on cleaning it up more, I simplified a lot of the code in order to keep the example concise. – sholsapp Feb 4 '17 at 18:20
  • Yes, I can see it's been distilled down to its essentials and I appreciate the effort you put in :) Just trying to dot the is. – Matthieu M. Feb 4 '17 at 18:21
2

I think you are pretty close to getting it to work.

There are only two hurdles:

  • thread::spawn will not allow sharing references
  • alive and loop for you to share in this design

The solution is two-fold:

  • split up things between the controller (Timer) and the worker (the closure)
  • share state between the two using Arc since references are forbidden

Here is a minimal example for you to toy with:

use std::{sync, thread, time};
use std::sync::atomic::{AtomicBool, Ordering};

pub struct Timer {
    handle: Option<thread::JoinHandle<()>>,
    alive: sync::Arc<AtomicBool>,
}

impl Timer {
    pub fn new() -> Timer {
        Timer {
            handle: None,
            alive: sync::Arc::new(AtomicBool::new(false)),
        }
    }

    pub fn start<F>(&mut self, fun: F)
        where F: 'static + Send + FnMut() -> ()
    {
        self.alive.store(true, Ordering::SeqCst);

        let alive = self.alive.clone();

        self.handle = Some(thread::spawn(move || {
            let mut fun = fun;
            while alive.load(Ordering::SeqCst) {
                fun();
                thread::sleep(time::Duration::from_millis(10));
            }
        }));
    }

    pub fn stop(&mut self) {
        self.alive.store(false, Ordering::SeqCst);
        self.handle
            .take().expect("Called stop on non-running thread")
            .join().expect("Could not join spawned thread");
    }
}

fn main() {
    let mut timer = Timer::new();
    timer.start(|| println!("Hello, World!") );

    println!("Feeling sleepy...");
    thread::sleep(time::Duration::from_millis(100));

    println!("Time for dinner!");
    timer.stop();
}

I invite you to poke holes at it one at a time (ie, change one thing that is different from your example, check the error message, and try to understand how the difference solved it).

On the playground, it printed for me:

Feeling sleepy...
Hello, World!
Hello, World!
Hello, World!
Hello, World!
Hello, World!
Hello, World!
Hello, World!
Hello, World!
Hello, World!
Hello, World!
Time for dinner!

Though I would not rely on (1) the number of times "Hello, World!" appears and (2) "Feeling sleepy..." appearing first.

And damned, is Atomic verbose... I kinda wish there was a get/set with SeqCst (the stronger ordering) available.

  • Thanks. My example didn't clearly emphasize that I would like the thread closure to be able to operate over additional state in the Timer. E.g., the loop function would like to signal a condition variable that users can wait for. Your approach (which passes in an external callable) still doesn't let me do this. Any additional thoughts on that? I'm going to keep playing with this example now, thanks again. – sholsapp Feb 4 '17 at 18:59
  • For full transparency, I'm fiddling around by reimplementing this class: github.com/sholsapp/gallocy/blob/master/gallocy/include/gallocy/… – sholsapp Feb 4 '17 at 19:00
  • It feels like if I could have an reference count to self things would work... – sholsapp Feb 4 '17 at 19:23
  • @sholsapp: The key is to deal with that like I dealt with alive. You don't need a reference-counted self, just reference-counted members of self. You can either have a single data member which is Arc<(Mutex<YourData>, CondVar)> or you can have multiple members each reference-counted independently. – Matthieu M. Feb 4 '17 at 19:30
  • Ah... this makes sense... and while I've been playing around that's starting to become clear. Based on my full C++ example I linked to, really the only reference counted members I need to pass to the closure are alive and timed_out, relinquishing all other state directly to the closure. Thanks! – sholsapp Feb 4 '17 at 19:34

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