I am trying to solve an issue I have with pulling large ints (22+ digits) into ASP.Net with Entity Framework Core from a MySQL database.

EF Core does not support BigInteger and the suggestions I received where to use decimal instead. However, when using decimal types on my entities, I always receive the following exception when trying to select from the DB:

System.InvalidCastException: Unable to cast object of type 'System.Int32' to type 'System.Decimal'

In the Database the columns are INT(25) and in my models the type is decimal, here is an example model:

[Table("alliance_reputation_rankings")]
public class AllianceReputationRank
{
    [JsonProperty(NullValueHandling = NullValueHandling.Ignore)]
    [Column("date")]
    public DateTime Date { get; set; }

    [JsonProperty(NullValueHandling = NullValueHandling.Ignore)]
    [Column("world")]
    public int World { get; set; }

    [JsonProperty(NullValueHandling = NullValueHandling.Ignore)]
    [Column("alliance")]
    public string Alliance { get; set; }

    [JsonProperty(NullValueHandling = NullValueHandling.Ignore)]
    [Column("rank")]
    public int Rank { get; set; }

    [JsonProperty(NullValueHandling = NullValueHandling.Ignore)]
    [Column("reputation")]
    public decimal Reputation { get; set; }

    [JsonProperty(NullValueHandling = NullValueHandling.Ignore)]
    [Key]
    [Column("entry_id")]
    public int EntryId { get; set; }
}

I cannot select the Reputation property using EF Core. Even if I try and use (decimal) before the property to cast it:

Rough example of a select:

_context.AllianceReputationRankings
   .Where(p => p.Date == rank.Date && p.Alliance== rank.Alliance && p.World == rank.World)
                                   .Select(pl =>  new AllianceReputationRank
                                   {
                                       Date = pl.Date,
                                       World = pl.World,
                                       Alliance = pl.Alliance,
                                       Reputation = (decimal)pl.Reputation
                                   }
                                   ).FirstOrDefault();

How can I use decimals in my models to bring in large ints from the database? If I cannot use decimals, how can I use large numbers with EF Core?

  • I think the only option is to have an unmapped property that converts the decimal value to/from BigInteger, and of course guard against overflow errors. You could give the decimal property a private setter. – Gert Arnold Feb 4 '17 at 20:59
  • @GertArnold I can't even get it as a decimal in the first place. Do you mean the Int value? – Douglas Gaskell Feb 4 '17 at 21:13
  • Ah no, I was thinking of using decimal in the database as well, but of course that's not what you want. I'm afraid EF is not the right tool here. – Gert Arnold Feb 4 '17 at 21:15
  • Have you tried double instead of decimal? – 202_accepted Feb 5 '17 at 2:39
  • @DouglasGaskell Also, is it possible to modify Reputation to be a string? Then you could use some workarounds and create a BigInteger property that parses the string and such (or the other way around, whichever you prefer). – 202_accepted Feb 5 '17 at 3:36

What I did that seemed to work is to multiply by 1m:

context.AllianceReputationRankings
   .Where(p => p.Date == rank.Date && p.Alliance== rank.Alliance && p.World == rank.World)
        .Select(pl =>  new AllianceReputationRank
        {
            Date = pl.Date,
            World = pl.World,
            Alliance = pl.Alliance,
            Reputation = pl.Reputation * 1m
        }
    ).FirstOrDefault();

This seems to allow decimal operations while not taking performance to the floor.

Entity Framework expects a very tight type-constraint between the database and model, it really doesn't like to see a numeric column with a decimal property. I've outlined several options here, each with it's own benefits and drawbacks. Feel free to use whichever one is the best for you.


Since you're using MySQL, the first option I'm outlining is that you could alter the column type from INT(25) to DECIMAL(25, 0). Then you should be able to use decimal in Entity Framework for that as much as you want.

If you can't do that, then, sadly, you're in a very tight corner. Entity Framework Core just isn't the right tool for this job, it's not mature enough. In comments you clarified that you are using this numeric column for math in the DB, which means string and VARCHAR(25) are out of the playing book, unless you can take that math out of the DB.


This solution relies on the assumption that this entire model is read-only. If it is (and you don't need to update the database from Entity Framework Core) then you can build a VIEW in MySQL that casts the INT(25) column to a VARCHAR(25), and do something like the following:

[NotMapped]
public BigInteger ReputationValue { get; set; }

public string Reputation
{
    get
    {
        return ReputationValue.ToString();
    }
    set
    {
        ReputationValue = BigInteger.Parse(value);
    }
}

The problem is that you can't really update the database through a VIEW, so if you wanted to update these records (anything to do with this entire model, basically) you would need to write manual SQL, or build a stored procedure. This is just a limitation of Entity Framework Core that can't really be gotten around easily.


Lastly, the final option is to use a stored procedure / method for reading and writing. You could then pass a WHERE clause to it (if you want to take the challenge of building a C#-style conversion, go for it, otherwise just add a WHERE sqlConditionCode ... string that you pass to the method to filter things by.

Then build a second stored procedure / method to do the updates. You could call dbContext.Update(model) which would pass everything to the stored procedure to do the update, and dbContext.Get("WHERE EntryId = @EntryId", new List<SqlParamter> { new SqlParamter("@EntryId", ...) }) I'm sure you get the idea by this point.

Something like:

public IEnumerable<AllianceReputationRank> GetAllianceReputationRanks(string whereClause, IEnumerable<MySqlParameter> parameters)
{
    // Get a connection string from somewhere
    var connectionString = string.Empty;

    using (var connection = new MySqlConnection(connectionString))
    using (var command = new MySqlCommand("SELECT * FROM alliance_reputation_rankings " + (whereClause ?? string.Empty), connection))
    {
        connection.Open();

        foreach (var parameter in parameters)
        {
            command.Parameters.Add(parameter);
        }

        using (var reader = command.ExecuteReader())
        {
            if (reader.HasRows)
            {
                // Build a list or use `yield return`, if building a list instance here
                var result = new List<AllianceReputationRank>();

                while (reader.Read())
                {
                    // Build a model of `AllianceReputationRank` here
                    var model = new AllianceReputationRank();

                    // Use reflection or just add each property manually
                    model.Date = reader.GetDate("date");
                    // ...

                    // Make sure you read `reputation` as a string, then `BigInteger.Parse` it to your model
                    model.Reputation = BigInteger.Parse(reader.GetString("reputation"));

                    // Either add the model to the list or `yield return model`
                    result.Add(model);
                }

                // If you built a list then `return` it
                return result;
            }
        }
    }
}

Building the opposite method is, well, just the opposite. The ?? string.Empty might be superfluous, I don't have an IDE in front of me to check if string + null will throw an exception, but you can remove it if you don't like it. (Better safe than sorry here, in my opinion.) I really hope all my types and usage is correct, if not, I apologize for any modifications needed other than adding the connection string and additional properties.


Honestly, the DECIMAL(25, 0) option should work for you, if that doesn't then the stored procedure / method option should. Both should keep your math in the DB and hopefully not break anything else while also fixing the Entity Framework Core issues at the same time. Is it less than ideal? Absolutely, and I wish it weren't what was necessary. But, unfortunately, Entity Framework Core is very new and still requires a lot of updates just to add simple functionality that Entity Framework not-Core has. (Like the lack of a .Find method in Entity Framework Core, for example.)

I wish we had better news, but without the ability to build our own mappable-types (I.e. build our own BigInteger that is supported by Entity Framework Core) there just isn't a lot to be done with this problem, we're stuck to nasty work-arounds to make it do what we need to.

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