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I wanna create a horizontal rectangle with a semicircular in its middle for my navbar menu. In addition to that all of this shape must have a background image.

Something like this:

sample

What is the best way to achieve this goal?

closed as too broad by CBroe, TylerH, Mark Rotteveel, Roman Doskoch, 1387233 Feb 6 '17 at 9:22

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • use a .png image ! – amir hosein ahmadi Feb 5 '17 at 6:12
  • @amirhoseinahmadi I've thinked about that but it's important for me to have responsiveness – EmiTis Yousefi Feb 5 '17 at 6:15
  • set the width of your element or image to 100% or use img-responsive from bootstrap, you copy the css of it – amir hosein ahmadi Feb 5 '17 at 6:23
  • something like this? – Yaakov Ainspan Feb 5 '17 at 7:11
  • 1
    Did either answer help you? If yes, you should consider marking that answer as "accepted" by clicking on the hollow/empty tick mark that is present below the voting buttons for that answer. That is the way to mark a problem as "solved" in SO. – Harry Feb 8 '17 at 4:14
9

Using SVG: (recommended)

The best tool to create shapes like these is SVG and not CSS. SVGs are scalable (and so useful for responsive designs), they allow us greater control over the shapes aspects - like the slope/curvature of the circle or ellipse and can also have images or gradients as fills (background) like show below.

It is very easy to draw the shape using SVG. Just use a path element along with the commands like move (M), arc (A), line (L) and close-path (z). Once shape is drawn, apply the image as its fill using pattern and image elements. The xlink:href attribute refers to the image's source.

Below is a very short explanation of what the above commands do. Detailed explanation can be found in this MDN page:

  • M - Moves pen to the point specified by the coordinate given immediately after the command.
  • A - Draw an arc with the specified X and Y radius, ending at the point specified after command.
  • L - Draw a straight line from one specified point to another.
  • z - Close the path by drawing a straight line from path's last point to its first point.

path {
  fill: url(#g-image);
}
body {
  background-image: radial-gradient(circle, #3F9CBA 0%, #153346 100%);
}
<svg viewBox='0 0 500 60' preserveAspectRatio='none'>
  <defs>
    <pattern id="g-image" width="1" height="1" patternUnits="objectBoundingBox">
      <image xlink:href="http://lorempixel.com/500/60/abstract/6" width="500" height="60" />
    </pattern>
  </defs>
  <path d='M0,0 0,25 205,25 A50,50 0 0,0 295,25 L500,25 500,0z' />
</svg>


Using Clip-path:

The other alternate is use to use a clip-path but its pure CSS version cannot be used because (a) it can create only simple/basic shapes and not paths like the one that we need and (b) it doesn't work in Firefox. So, we will have to use clip-path with an inline SVG element like shown below.

The drawback of using clip-path is that this won't work in IE even with the inline SVG element.

div {
  height: 75px;
  width: 600px;
  background: url(http://lorempixel.com/500/100/abstract/6);
  -webkit-clip-path: url(#clipper);
  clip-path: url(#clipper);
}
body {
  background-image: radial-gradient(circle, #3F9CBA 0%, #153346 100%);
}
<svg width='0' height='0'>
  <defs>
    <clipPath id='clipper' clipPathUnits='objectBoundingBox'>
      <path d='M0,0 0,.42 .41,.42 A.1,.83 0 0,0 .59,.42 L1,.42 1,0z' />
    </clipPath>
  </defs>
</svg>
<div></div>


Using CSS Masks:

This option is currently not supported due to its poor browser support but is a very good option when all browsers start supporting it. In this method, we create a radial-gradient based mask which cuts out the bottom part of the image except for that circular arc area. Since the gradients can take a fixed pixel value as radii for the X and Y axis of the circular cut, the length of that arc area will not increase even if the image is stretched to be responsive.

div {
  height: 100px;
  width: 100%;
  background: url(http://lorempixel.com/600/100/abstract/6);
  -webkit-mask-image: linear-gradient(to right, white, white), radial-gradient(145px 145px at 50% -25px, white 50%, transparent 51%);
  -webkit-mask-position: 0% 0%, 0% 100%;
  -webkit-mask-size: 100% 50%;
  -webkit-mask-repeat: no-repeat;
}
<div></div>

  • Good answer .... but for a bad question :-) – vals Feb 6 '17 at 8:31
  • I agree on the question quality buddy but I'm looking at the possibility that this may help some other user in the future and save them the pain of having to type out a question. @vals – Harry Feb 6 '17 at 9:00
1

The basic trick to get this layout is that we will try to create an overlay having a layer of solid color with transparent circle in center and place it on above the element with background image.

This is possible in 2 different ways:

Using Radial Gradient:

We will use css3 radial-gradient() to create a background image having transparent circle / ellipse of specific size in center. The drawback of using radial gradient is that central circle shape is not very smooth.

body {
  background: white;
}
.box {
  background: url("https://i.imgur.com/waDgcnc.jpg") no-repeat;
  background-size: cover;
  position: relative;
  height: 100px;
}

.overlay {
  background: radial-gradient(95px 70px at 50% 0, transparent, transparent 40px, #fff 30px);
  position: absolute;
  overflow: hidden;
  height: 30px;
  bottom: 0;
  right: 0;
  left: 0;
}
<div class="box">
  <div class="overlay">
  
  </div>
</div>

Using Pseudo Elements:

We can create this overlay with a ::before or ::after pseudo element in a circle shape having large box shadow values. The central circle / ellipse create with this looks much better and smooth than radial-gradient().

body {
  background: white;
}

.box {
  background: url("https://i.imgur.com/waDgcnc.jpg") no-repeat;
  background-size: cover;
  position: relative;
  height: 100px;
}

.overlay {
  position: absolute;
  overflow: hidden;
  height: 30px;
  bottom: 0;
  right: 0;
  left: 0;
}

.overlay:before {
  box-shadow: 0 0 0 1000px #fff;
  transform: translateX(-50%);
  border-radius: 100%;
  position: absolute;
  height: 70px;
  content: '';
  width: 100px;
  bottom: 0;
  left: 50%;
}
<div class="box">
  <div class="overlay">
  
  </div>
</div>

Note: These method will work only when nearest ancestor with background property has some solid color applied to it. This method will not work if the ancestor is having some image as background or linear / radial gradient.

Useful Resources:

  1. Linear Gradient: MDN, Quackit.
  2. Radial Gradient: MDN, Quackit.

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