I want to recursively search through a directory with subdirectories of text files and replace every occurrence of {$replace} within the files with the contents of a multi line string. How can this be achieved with python?

[EDIT]

So far all I have is the recursive code using os.walk to get a list of files that are required to be changed.

import os
import sys
fileList = []
rootdir = "C:\\test"
for root, subFolders, files in os.walk(rootdir):
  if subFolders != ".svn":
    for file in files:
      fileParts = file.split('.')
      if len(fileParts) > 1:
        if fileParts[1] == "php":
          fileList.append(os.path.join(root,file))


print fileList
  • 5
    If you tell us what you have so far, we will be more likely to help. – unholysampler Nov 17 '10 at 15:21
  • 1
    Why do you need to use Python for this? A combination of find and sed would do the job more elegantly, in my opinion. developmentality.wordpress.com/2010/09/07/… Basically, find . -type f -exec sed -i '.bk' 's/search regexp/replacement string/g' {} \; (Haven't tested but I think that's the correct syntax) – I82Much Nov 17 '10 at 16:11
  • @I82Much - but your solution would require learning sed. If OP already knows basic Python, and is not obsessed learning new tool (prefers mastering existing ones), solving the task in Python makes more sense. – P.M Sep 28 '16 at 15:21
  • @I82Much: c:\test might be one reason (Windows). find /c/test -type d -path \*/.svn -prune -o -type f -name \*.php -exec sed -i 's/{\$replace}/multiline\nstring/g' {} + shell command is close to this Python code – jfs Apr 27 '17 at 23:44
up vote 20 down vote accepted

Check out os.walk:

import os
replacement = """some
multi-line string"""
for dname, dirs, files in os.walk("some_dir"):
    for fname in files:
        fpath = os.path.join(dname, fname)
        with open(fpath) as f:
            s = f.read()
        s = s.replace("{$replace}", replacement)
        with open(fpath, "w") as f:
            f.write(s)

The above solution has flaws, such as the fact that it opens literally every file it finds, or the fact that each file is read entirely into memory (which would be bad if you had a 1GB text file), but it should be a good starting point.

You also may want to look into the re module if you want to do a more complex find/replace than looking for a specific string.

  • Thanks, I was almost there. – Martin Nov 17 '10 at 16:05

os.walk is great. However, it looks like you need to filer file types (which I would suggest if you are going to walk some directory). To do this, you should add import fnmatch.

import os, fnmatch
def findReplace(directory, find, replace, filePattern):
    for path, dirs, files in os.walk(os.path.abspath(directory)):
        for filename in fnmatch.filter(files, filePattern):
            filepath = os.path.join(path, filename)
            with open(filepath) as f:
                s = f.read()
            s = s.replace(find, replace)
            with open(filepath, "w") as f:
                f.write(s)

This allows you to do something like:

findReplace("some_dir", "find this", "replace with this", "*.txt")
  • 2
    This is exactly what I was looking for. What a great answer! – Byron Sommardahl Jun 6 '11 at 20:04
  • 1
    Great method, thanks for sharing – estemendoza Oct 12 '12 at 19:10
  • to avoid loading the whole file in memory, you could use fileinput module – jfs Sep 17 '14 at 8:30
  • works great! This helped me – JoeCodeCreations Jul 13 '15 at 17:59

To avoid recursing into .svn directories, os.walk() allows you to change the dirs list inplace. To simplify the text replacement in a file without requiring to read the whole file in memory, you could use fileinput module. And to filter filenames using a file pattern, you could use fnmatch module as suggested by @David Sulpy:

#!/usr/bin/env python
from __future__ import print_function
import fnmatch
import os
from fileinput import FileInput

def find_replace(topdir, file_pattern, text, replacement):
    for dirpath, dirs, files in os.walk(topdir, topdown=True):
        dirs[:] = [d for d in dirs if d != '.svn'] # skip .svn dirs
        files = [os.path.join(dirpath, filename)
                 for filename in fnmatch.filter(files, file_pattern)]
        for line in FileInput(files, inplace=True):
            print(line.replace(text, replacement), end='')

find_replace(r"C:\test", "*.php", '{$replace}', "multiline\nreplacement")

For those using Python 3.5+ you can now use a glob recursively with the use of ** and the recursive flag.

Here's an example replacing hello with world for all .txt files:

for filepath in glob.iglob('./**/*.txt', recursive=True):
    with open(filepath) as file:
        s = file.read()
    s = s.replace('hello', 'world')
    with open(filepath, "w") as file:
        file.write(s)

Sulpy's answer is good but incomplete. The user would be likely to want to input the parameters through an entry widget, so we might have something more like this (also incomplete, but left as an exercise):

import os, fnmatch
from Tkinter import *
fields = 'Folder', 'Search', 'Replace', 'FilePattern'

def fetch(entvals):
#    print entvals
#    print ents
    entItems = entvals.items()
    for entItem in entItems:
        field = entItem[0]
        text  = entItem[1].get()
        print('%s: "%s"' % (field, text))

def findReplace(entvals):
#    print ents
    directory = entvals.get("Folder").get()
    find = entvals.get("Search").get()
    replace = entvals.get("Replace").get()
    filePattern = entvals.get("FilePattern").get()
    for path, dirs, files in os.walk(os.path.abspath(directory)):
        for filename in fnmatch.filter(files, filePattern):
#            print filename
            filepath = os.path.join(path, filename)
            print filepath  # Can be commented out --  used for confirmation
            with open(filepath) as f:
                s = f.read()
            s = s.replace(find, replace)
            with open(filepath, "w") as f:
                f.write(s)

def makeform(root, fields):
    entvals = {}
    for field in fields:
        row = Frame(root)
        lab = Label(row, width=17, text=field+": ", anchor='w')
        ent = Entry(row)
        row.pack(side=TOP, fill=X, padx=5, pady=5)
        lab.pack(side=LEFT)
        ent.pack(side=RIGHT, expand=YES, fill=X)
        entvals[field] = ent
#        print ent
    return entvals

if __name__ == '__main__':
    root = Tk()
    root.title("Recursive S&R")
    ents = makeform(root, fields)
#    print ents
    root.bind('<Return>', (lambda event, e=ents: fetch(e)))
    b1 = Button(root, text='Show', command=(lambda e=ents: fetch(e)))
    b1.pack(side=LEFT, padx=5, pady=5)
    b2 = Button(root, text='Execute', command=(lambda e=ents: findReplace(e)))
    b2.pack(side=LEFT, padx=5, pady=5)
    b3 = Button(root, text='Quit', command=root.quit)
    b3.pack(side=LEFT, padx=5, pady=5)
    root.mainloop()

Here's my code (which I think is the same as the above but I'm including it just in case there's something subtly different about it):

import os, fnmatch, sys
def findReplace(directory, find, replace, filePattern):
    for path, dirs, files in os.walk(os.path.abspath(directory)):
        for filename in fnmatch.filter(files, filePattern):         
            filepath = os.path.join(path, filename)
            with open(filepath) as f:
                s = f.read()
            s = s.replace(find, replace)
            with open(filepath, "w") as f:
                f.write(s)

it runs without error. BUT, the file, in z:\test is unchanged. I've put in print statements, like print("got here") but they don't print out either.

How about just using:

clean = ''.join([e for e in text if e != 'string'])

Multiple files string change

import glob

for allfiles in glob.glob('*.txt'):

for line in open(allfiles,'r'):
    change=line.replace("old_string","new_string")
    output=open(allfiles,'w')
    output.write(change)    
  • 2
    Please test your code before posting, this will just erase most of the content of the files! Don't try this! – Thierry Lathuille Jul 17 '17 at 9:06
  • As @ThierryLathuille said, this answer is wrong and potentially harmful. – pzp Aug 28 '17 at 2:04

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