1

I have a situation where I want to make normal property to be readonly in derived class with default value. I am using keyword new for that purpose in the following way:

public abstract class BaseClass
{
    public virtual string SomeInfo { get; set; }
}
public class DerivedClass1 : BaseClass
{
    public new string SomeInfo => "ChildInfo1"; // C# 6.0 equivalent of { get { return "ChildInfo1"; } }
}

It works fine, and new DerivedClass1().SomeInfo cannot be assigned to -- it is readonly. I'm aware that one could access it through base class:

BaseClass b1 = new DerivedClass1();
b1.SomeInfo = "ChildInfo1 changed";

I just want to unable user to change it accidentally, and through base class it would be on purpose in which case it's acceptible.

However if Derived class would be like this:

public class DerivedClass2 : BaseClass
{
    public override string SomeInfo => "ChildInfo2";
}

Then this property would be accessible and you could seemingly change it but it would not be changed, and I would like to understand why?

var d2 = new DerivedClass2();
d2.SomeInfo = "ChildInfo2 changed";
Console.WriteLine(d2.SomeInfo); // output: ChildInfo2

UPDATE:
I have added new answer as third option, probably the best.

  • 1
    "I just want to unable user to change it accidentally, and through base class it would be on purpose in which case it's acceptible." Is it "on purpose" if the programmer calls a method accepting a BaseClass parameter, where - unbeknown to the programmer - that method changes SomeInfo? In any case, what you're proposing violates the Liskov substitution principle and should be viewed with suspicion. – Matthew Watson Feb 6 '17 at 10:33
  • I was thinking that this might violate LSP. Is there any other(better) way to achieve this without violating it ? – borisdj Feb 6 '17 at 10:56
  • Well, you could create an interface which was read-only and pass that around, but of course that would require modifying existing methods so it might not be an option. – Matthew Watson Feb 6 '17 at 12:26
  • I figured out a better solution, my next post on this question. – borisdj Feb 6 '17 at 12:34
1

In your base Class you have

public virtual string SomeInfo { get; set; }

It's just a nice definition of:

private string _someInfo;
public string SomeInfo
{
  get {return _someInfo;}
  set {_someInfo = value;}
}

if you override it with an Expression-Bodied property you override the get property with

public string SomeInfo
{
  get {return "ChildInfo2";}
}

But you don't override set property, so you could still set the private variable, but it doesn' change anything else.

if you look on your first example:

BaseClass b1 = new DerivedClass1();
b1.SomeInfo = "ChildInfo1 changed";

it happens exact the same thing, you could set property, because base class does have setter and sets a private variable, but if you try to output value of SomeProperty, you see, that it is not changed and is still "ChildInfo1"

| improve this answer | |
  • So setter sets private field behind it, but getter returns what is in get part of Property method which actually ignores this field. I understand now. – borisdj Feb 6 '17 at 11:22
  • @Boris yes, this expression-bodied property just means: "always return that constant value" – Maksim Simkin Feb 6 '17 at 12:20
0

I have now made third options that could be the best, setting default value in Constructor. Thanks to @MatthewWatson for drawing attention to LSP and @MaksimSimkin for explanation.

public abstract class BaseClass
{
    public string SomeInfo { get; set; }
}

public class DerivedClass1 : BaseClass
{
    public DerivedClass1()
    {
        base.SomeInfo = "ChildInfo1";
    }
    public new string SomeInfo => base.SomeInfo;
}

This makes SomeInfo readOnly when accessed from DerivedClass, and if accessed through BaseClass it is editable and change regularly applies, and is visible from both classes. So there is no 'unknown' behavior.

PS For older versions of C# this is equivalent:

public abstract class BaseClass
{
    protected string _someInfo;
    public string SomeInfo
    {
        get { return _someInfo; }
        set { _someInfo = value; }
    }
}

public class DerivedClass1 : BaseClass
{
    public DerivedClass1()
    {
        _someInfo = "ChildInfo1";
    }
    public new string SomeInfo
    {
        get { return _someInfo; }
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
0

You should avoid using "new" in this situation. Define in your derived class, instead, a readonly property in this way:

public override string SomeInfo { get { return "ChildInfo"; } }

You can still set your property but it always will return the default value "ChildInfo".

| improve this answer | |
  • Is it not the same? This gives warning that it hides inherited member, and suggests adding new, or overriding if that was intended. Adding new just explicitly confirms to hide but behavior is the same? So LSP is still violated. – borisdj Feb 6 '17 at 11:14
  • @Boris, You're right.I had forgotten to write "override". Now fixed. Yes, in this case using "new" or "override" get the same result. But, as you know, using "new" violates LSP. – jacktric Feb 6 '17 at 13:35
  • "new" and "override" are not the same. Your initial post didn't have any keyword of these two, and that implicitly means to hide, so "new" is the same as none. "override" as you have updated now is like my second option, and in that case you have access to the setter but getter ignores it, so it's counterintuitive. You think you have changed Property but you do not. That's why third option, that I added as another answer, is best. – borisdj Feb 6 '17 at 14:40
  • Ok, but pay attention with your last solution because the user can still do something like BaseClass bc = new DerivedClass() and access the property again in write mode. – jacktric Feb 6 '17 at 18:07
  • Yes, but that is fine for me in this case where I am using it. I wrote it with that possibility in mind. So in standard use it will be readonly, there is no need to change it, and in not standard use if someone explicitly changes it through BaseClass it will still work with changed value. – borisdj Feb 6 '17 at 19:06

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