2

Here's a dumbed-down version of what I want to do:

private static int Inc(int input)
{
    return input + 1;
}

private static async Task<int> IncAsync(int input)
{
    await Task.Delay(200);
    return input + 1;
}

private static async Task<IEnumerable<TResult>> GetResultsAsync<TInput, TResult>(Func<TInput, TResult> func, IEnumerable<TInput> values)
{
    var tasks = values.Select(value => Task.Run(() => func(value)))
                      .ToList();
    await Task.WhenAll(tasks);
    return tasks.Select(t => t.Result);
}

public async void TestAsyncStuff()
{
    var numbers = new[] { 1, 2, 3, 4 };
    var resultSync = await GetResultsAsync(Inc, numbers); // returns IEnumerable<int>
    Console.WriteLine(string.Join(",", resultSync.Select(n => $"{n}")));
   // The next line is the important one:
    var resultAsync = await GetResultsAsync(IncAsync, numbers); // returns IEnumerable<Task<int>>
}

So basically, GetResultsAsync() is intended to be a generic method that will get the results of a function for a set of input values. In TestAsyncStuff() you can see how it would work for calling a synchronous function (Inc()).

The trouble comes when I want to call an asynchronous function (IncAsync()). The result I get back is of type IEnumerable<Task<int>>. I could do a Task.WhenAll() on that result, and that works:

var tasksAsync = (await GetResultsAsync(IncAsync, numbers)).ToList();
await Task.WhenAll(tasksAsync);
var resultAsync = tasksAsync.Select(t => t.Result);
Console.WriteLine(string.Join(",", resultAsync.Select(n => $"{n}")));

But I'd like to tighten up the code and do the await inline. It should look something like this:

var resultAsync = await GetResultsAsync(async n => await IncAsync(n), numbers);

But that also returns an IEnumerable<Task<int>>! I could do this:

var resultAsync = await GetResultsAsync(n => IncAsync(n).GetAwaiter().GetResult(), numbers);

And that works... but from what I've seen, use of Task.GetAwaiter().GetResult() or Task.Result is not encouraged.

So what is the correct way to do this?

8
  • var resultAsync = await GetResultsAsync(n => IncAsync(n).Result, numbers);? – René Vogt Feb 6 '17 at 12:15
  • 2
    Don't use async void, it's only meant for event handlers. You can't await an async void method – Panagiotis Kanavos Feb 6 '17 at 12:15
  • 3
    Also await Task.WhenAll(tasks); return tasks.Select(t => t.Result);? Why? If all tasks have a return type, WhenAll returns an array of the results. By cleaning up the code you should be able to write int[] results=await Task.WhenAll(tasks); – Panagiotis Kanavos Feb 6 '17 at 12:18
  • 2
    What are you trying to do after all? If you end up calling Task.Run, why not use Parallel.For? Task.Run doesn't make anything asynchronous, it runs jobs in the background – Panagiotis Kanavos Feb 6 '17 at 12:19
  • 1
    Parallel.For() is for Actions, not Funcs? I'd say Plinq is for Funcs – Chris F Carroll Feb 6 '17 at 13:05
3

You should create two overloads of GetResultsAsync. One should accept a 'synchronous' delegate which returns TResult. This method will wrap each delegate into a task, and run them asynchronously:

private static async Task<IEnumerable<TResult>> GetResultsAsync<TInput, TResult>(
   Func<TInput, TResult> func, IEnumerable<TInput> values)
{
    var tasks = values.Select(value => Task.Run(() => func(value)));
    return await Task.WhenAll(tasks);
}

The second overload will accept an 'asynchronous' delegate, which returns Task<TResult>. This method doesn't need to wrap each delegate into a task, because they are already tasks:

private static async Task<IEnumerable<TResult>> GetResultsAsync<TInput, TResult>(
   Func<TInput, Task<TResult>> func, IEnumerable<TInput> values)
{
    var tasks = values.Select(value => func(value));
    return await Task.WhenAll(tasks);
}

You even can call the second method from the first one to avoid code duplication:

private static async Task<IEnumerable<TResult>> GetResultsAsync<TInput, TResult>(
   Func<TInput, TResult> func, IEnumerable<TInput> values)
{
    return await GetResultsAsync(x => Task.Run(() => func(x)), values);
}

NOTE: These methods don't simplify your life a lot. The same results can be achieved with

var resultSync = await Task.WhenAll(numbers.Select(x => Task.Run(() => Inc(x))));
var resultAsync = await Task.WhenAll(numbers.Select(IncAsync));
0

I'd say that your concern is a stylistic one: you want something that reads better. For your first case consider:

var resultSync= numbers.AsParallel()/*.AsOrdered()*/.Select(Inc);

on the grounds that Plinq already does what you're trying to do: It parallelizes IEnumerables. For your second case, there's no point in creating Tasks around Tasks. The equivalent would be:

var resultAsync = numbers.AsParallel()./*AsOrdered().*/Select(n => IncAsync(n).Result);

but I like Sergey's await Task.WhenAll(numbers.Select(IncAsync)) better.


Perhaps what I really like is a Linq style pair of overloads:

var numbers = Enumerable.Range(1,6);
var resultSync = await Enumerable.Range(1,6).SelectAsync(Inc);
var resultAsync = await Enumerable.Range(1,100).SelectAsync(IncAsync);

Console.WriteLine("sync" + string.Join(",", resultSync));
Console.WriteLine("async" + string.Join(",", resultAsync));


static class IEnumerableTasks
{
    public static Task<TResult[]> SelectAsync<TSource, TResult>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source, Func<TSource, TResult> func)
    {
        return Task.WhenAll( source.Select(async n => await Task.Run(()=> func(n))));
    }

    public static Task<TResult[]> SelectAsync<TSource, TResult>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source, Func<TSource, Task<TResult>> func)
    {
        return Task.WhenAll(source.Select(func));
    }
}
static int Inc(int input) 
{ 
    Task.Delay(1000).Wait();
    return input+1;
}

static async Task<int> IncAsync(int input)
{
    await Task.Delay(1000);
    return input + 1;
}

Which, incidentally, if you change Range(1,6) to Range(1,40) shows the advantage of async. On my machine, the timing for the sync can rise steeply where the async version stays at a second or so even for Range(1, 100000)

1
  • This is great. I finally went with a combination of your answer with Sergey's, using .AsParallel(), based on the performance considerations mentioned here. Unfortunately I could only give one of you answer credit... :) – Shaul Behr Feb 6 '17 at 13:29

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