2

Is it possible to use XOR swapping algorithm with float values in c++?

However wikipedia says that:

XOR bitwise operation to swap values of distinct variables having the same data type

but I am bit confused. With this code:

void xorSwap (int* x, int* y) {
   *x ^= *y;
   *y ^= *x;
   *x ^= *y;
}

int main() {

   float a = 255.33333f;
   float b = 0.123023f;
   xorSwap(reinterpret_cast<int*>(&a), reinterpret_cast<int*>(&b));
   std::cout << a << ", " << b << "\n";

   return 0;
}

it seems to work (at least under gcc), but I am concerned if such a practice is allowed if needed?

  • 1
    Remember that the data for your floating point variables are stored as just zeroes and ones, just like any other data and values on a binary computer. Operating on the bits will work just the same, no matter what those bits represents. – Some programmer dude Feb 6 '17 at 13:54
  • What's the problem? Your quote from Wikipedia says that it is possible, and it's right because of what @Someprogrammerdude said :D – ForceBru Feb 6 '17 at 13:55
  • 3
    Please don't use the xor trick. It's useless unless you're so short of memory that you can't afford an extra integer (and even modern embedded systems have bucketloads of memory), and it's probably slower than a simple temp variable swap. It should be relegated to the days of us old folk who still fondly remember tring to cram their code into a 1K ZX80 :-) – paxdiablo Feb 6 '17 at 13:56
  • 2
    Accessing data through a pointer to a different, unrelated type is undefined behavior. Or am I missing some new development in the C++ standard? – IInspectable Feb 6 '17 at 14:06
  • 1
    Aside from questions of whether this works in general, try swapping a value with itself. – Pete Becker Feb 6 '17 at 14:58
6

Technically, what you ask is possible but, as clearly commented by IInspectable, it causes UB (Undefined Behaviour).
Anyway, I do suggest you to use std::swap instead, it's a template often specialized for specific data types and designed to do a good job.

  • 2
    §3.10 p 10 [basic.lval]: "If a program attempts to access the stored value of an object through a glvalue of other than one of the following types the behavior is undefined: [...]" - So, yes, possible, plausible, clean. And wrong. This is undefined. – IInspectable Feb 6 '17 at 14:15
  • Sorry, it doesn't cause undefined behaviour. It simply cannot, the algorithm is independent of the binary interpretation of the information swapped. The byte patterns are swapped the same as would be through assignments. We are going too far with the UB issue, I'm afraid. it's like saying that transmitting a bit pattern through a comms line makes undefined behaviour, as bits in a float are send as bits and not as a double. – Luis Colorado Feb 9 '17 at 7:54
1

If int is the same size as float, it is going to work in practice on any reasonable architecture. The memory in the float is a set of bits, you interpret those bits and swap them completely using xor operations. You can then use Those bits as the proper floats again. The quote you refer to only says that the two values you swap need to be of the same type, and both are ints.

However, on some architectures, this can result in a movement between different sorts of registers, or explicitly flushing registers to memory. What you will see on almost any sane architecture with a sane optimizing compiler these days, is that an explicit swap, using std::swap or an expression with a temporary variable, is in fact faster.

I.e. you should write:

float a = 255.33333f;
float b = 0.123023f;
float tmp = a;
a = b;
b = tmp;

or preferably:

float a = 255.33333f;
float b = 0.123023f;
std::swap(a,b);

If the standard library author for your architecture has determined xor swapping to indeed be beneficial, then you should hope that the last form will use it. xor swapping is a typical bad idiom in terms of hiding intent in an unneccesarily arcane implementation. It was only ever efficient in seriously register-starved cases with bad optimizers.

  • The xor-trick would also fail if int and float had the same size, but int had a stricter alignment requirement. I admit that it is unlikely. – Hans Olsson Feb 6 '17 at 14:13
  • @HansOlsson: To the contrary, with dedicated FPU circituitry, different alignment requirements between floating point types and integer types are more likely than not. All the more since FPU calculations are often performed in SIMD units, that do require alignment usually different from that for the general purpose CPU registers. – IInspectable Feb 6 '17 at 14:19
  • @IInspectable The special SIMD units is likely to have a stricter alignment for floats, but the problem with xor-trick only occurs if the alignment-requirement for int is stricter. – Hans Olsson Feb 6 '17 at 15:32
1

Your code there invokes undefined behavior. It's not legal in C or C++ to cast a float* to a int* and use it as such. reinterpret_cast should be used to to convert between unrelated structs with compatible layouts, or to temporarily convert between a typed pointer and void*.

Oh, and in this particular case the UB is not of merely academic concern. A compiler may notice that xorSwap() doesn't touch any floats, perform optimizations allowed to it by the aliasing rules of the language, and print out the original values of a and b instead of the swapped values. And that's not even getting into architectures where int and float are of different sizes or alignments.

If you wanted to do this safely, you'd have to memcpy() from your floats into unsigned char arrays, do the XOR in a loop, then memcpy() back. Which would of course make the operation slower than a normal swap. Of course, xor-based swapping is ALREADY slower than normal swapping.

  • " reinterpret_cast should be used to to convert between ... a typed pointer and void* ". Wouldn't you use static_cast for that? – eerorika Feb 6 '17 at 14:39
  • @user2079303 The two have equivalent functionality in that situation, but I tend to prefer reinterpret_cast, just because it looks scary to a level appropriate to the situation. Of course, it's pretty rare to use void* in C++ in the first place, so the question doesn't often come up. – Sneftel Feb 6 '17 at 14:49
1

It is:

a) possible when the compiler allows it.

b) an operation for which the standard does not define behaviour (i.e. undefined behaviour)

c) on gcc, actually less efficient than stating exactly what you want:

given:

void xorSwap (unsigned int* x, unsigned int* y) {
   *x ^= *y;
   *y ^= *x;
   *x ^= *y;
}

void swapit3(float& a, float&b)
{
  xorSwap(reinterpret_cast<unsigned int*>(&a), reinterpret_cast<unsigned int*>(&b));
}

results in this:

swapit3(float&, float&):                         # @swapit3(float&, float&)
        mov     eax, dword ptr [rdi]
        xor     eax, dword ptr [rsi]
        mov     dword ptr [rdi], eax
        xor     eax, dword ptr [rsi]
        mov     dword ptr [rsi], eax
        xor     dword ptr [rdi], eax
        ret

whereas this:

void swapit2(float& a, float&b)
{
  std::swap(a,b);
}

results in this:

swapit2(float&, float&):                         # @swapit2(float&, float&)
        mov     eax, dword ptr [rdi]
        mov     ecx, dword ptr [rsi]
        mov     dword ptr [rdi], ecx
        mov     dword ptr [rsi], eax
        ret

link: https://godbolt.org/g/K4cazx

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