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In the following example I don't understand why I cannot access the getter methods on the M1, M2, M3 classes.

I need the trait S to be covariant with T in order to implement the runSeq method. Because of that the toto method needs to take U as superclass of T. When I do that, I can no longer access the constructor fields of the argument t.

If I remove the covariance requirement (+T) everything works but then I dont know how to implement the runSeq method (in particular it needs to receive an implicit type-class object).

abstract class M
case class M1(s: String) extends M
case class M2(i: Int) extends M
case class M3(b: Boolean) extends M
trait S[+T] {
  def follow(s: String): String
  def toto[U >: T](t: U): String
}
implicit object S1 extends S[M1] {
  val m1 = M1("1") // this is for testing only
  def follow(s: String): String = s + ".M1." + toto(m1)
  def toto[M1](t: M1): String = "toto" + t.s // ERROR: cannot resolve "s"
}
implicit object S2 extends S[M2] {
  val m2 = M2(2) // for testing purposes only
  def follow(s: String): String = s + ".M2." + toto(m2)
  def toto[M2](t: M2): String = "toto" + t.i.toString // ERROR: cannot resolve "i"
}
implicit object S3 extends S[M3] {
  val m3 = M3(true) // for testing purposes
  def follow(s: String): String = s + ".M3." + toto(m3)
  def toto[M3](t: M3): String = "toto" + t.b.toString // ERROR: cannot resolve "b"
}
def run[T: S](s: String): String = implicitly[S[T]].follow(s)

run[M1]("run")

def runSeq(seq: S[M]*)(s: String) =
  seq.foldLeft(s)((st, tg) => run(st)(tg))

runSeq(S3,S2,S1)("runSeq")
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First, note that def toto[U >: T](t: U): String is basically the same as def toto(t: Any): String, since Any satisfies the bound for any possible T. This also explains why you can't access T's members in t. Note that variance is irrelevant for this.

T is only covariant because runSeq needs to take a sequence of S[T] with various types of T derived from M. Is there a better way of doing that?

def runSeq(seq: S[_ <: M]*) corresponds directly to this. However, you are likely to run into type erasure problems: given an S[_ <: M], you can't know its actual type parameter or check if an M is of a suitable type. Look up ClassTag and TypeTag for solutions. Again, this is a problem independent of variance.

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  • Thank you Alexey. I also reached the conclusion that variance was not appropriate. I have to fix runSeq as you suggest. My initial goal was avoiding type matching. – Laurent Feb 7 '17 at 9:56
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You are shadowing with the type parameters (e.g. M1 with def toto[M1](t: M1): String = "toto" + t.s).

Considering trait S[+T] { ... def toto[U >: T](t: U): String } for object S1 extends S[M1], a compliant toto should be implemented as bellow.

def toto[U >: M1](t: U): String = "toto" + t.s

In such case, with U >: M1, the type system cannot prove that t is defined s: String.

The type constraints and variance seems wrong there.

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  • Thanks. I see what's the problem now. The reason I got this wrong is U should really only be allowed to equal T but since T is covariant that doesnt work. T is only covariant because runSeq needs to take a sequence of S[T] with various types of T derived from M. Is there a better way of doing that? Note that M represent messages and S the processing step of those messages. – Laurent Feb 6 '17 at 22:34
  • Start with a simpler design (using contravariance on a typeparam for which a >: is then used seems overcomplicated) – cchantep Feb 6 '17 at 23:47

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