3

I am still learning Rust and when trying to implement Dikjstra as part of a training project, I encountered this peculiar catch. First I define a HashMap:

let mut dist: HashMap<Node, usize> = HashMap::new();

And later:

let state = State { node: next_node.clone(), cost: cost + 1 };
let current_dist = dist.get(&state.node);
if (current_dist == None) || (state.cost < *current_dist.unwrap()) {
    dist.insert(state.node.clone(), state.cost);
    heap.push(state);
}

Which yields a compile error because dist.get triggers a immutable borrow which stays in scope until after the if ... {...} statement, and in particular when I dist.insert, asking for a mutable borrow.

I think I miss a pattern or a keyword allowing me this type of process. For now I tried a drop at the beginning of the if scope, and other current_dist evaluation such as

let current_dist;
{
    current_dist = dist.get(&state.node);
}

or

let current_dist = {|| dist.get(&state.node)}();

but the end of scope of the immutable borrow still happen after the if statement.

  • (current_dist == None) | (state.cost < *current_dist.unwrap()) I can't imagine that you want a bitwise OR operation there. – Shepmaster Feb 6 '17 at 19:31
  • Please review how to create a minimal reproducible example. You haven't defined what Node, State or heap are. – Shepmaster Feb 6 '17 at 19:38
  • 1
    I corrected the ||. The definition of State seemed implied by the creation of state, and Node and heap didn't seem relevant (Node is a set of coordinates, heap is a heap). – Thrastylon Feb 7 '17 at 1:56
  • and Node and heap didn't seem relevant — then remove them from your question. Again, I strongly encourage you to review what we mean by a minimal reproducible example; emphasis on the Minimal. The reason for doing this is twofold: 1. by reducing the problem, you are more likely to solve it yourself, 2. a reduced problem is easier for other people to quickly understand. These people include answerers and future question askers who find your question. – Shepmaster Feb 7 '17 at 2:54
8

After non-lexical lifetimes

Since non-lexical lifetimes are now enabled, the original code compiles. That being said, you should still use the entry API for efficiency, otherwise you have to hash the key multiple times:

use std::collections::hash_map::Entry;
use std::collections::HashMap;

fn main() {
    let mut dist: HashMap<u8, u8> = HashMap::new();

    let cost = 21;

    match dist.entry(42) {
        Entry::Vacant(entry) => {
            entry.insert(42);
        }
        Entry::Occupied(mut entry) => {
            if *entry.get() < cost {
                entry.insert(42);
            }
        }
    }
}

Before non-lexical lifetimes

because dist.get triggers a mutable borrow

No, it's just an immutable borrow:

pub fn get<Q: ?Sized>(&self, k: &Q) -> Option<&V>
where
    K: Borrow<Q>,
    Q: Hash + Eq, 

I tried a drop

Explicit drops do not affect lifetimes.

let current_dist;
{
    current_dist = dist.get(&state.node);
}

Here you aren't fooling anyone. If the compiler was confused by this, it wouldn't be very good. This still has a borrow to the HashMap, there's just some extra blocks scattered about.

let current_dist = {|| dist.get(&state.node)}();

Same here. Returning the reference from a closure is still returning a reference. You really cannot easily trick the compiler into thinking that your reference to the HashMap doesn't exist.


You need to use a block to constrain how long the borrow exists. the simplest transformation is something akin to:

use std::collections::HashMap;

fn main() {
    let mut dist: HashMap<u8, u8> = HashMap::new();

    let do_it = {
        let current_dist = dist.get(&42);
        current_dist == None || true
    };

    if do_it {
        dist.insert(42, 42);
    }
}

This isn't the prettiest, but some combinators can clean it up:

use std::collections::HashMap;

fn main() {
    let mut dist: HashMap<u8, u8> = HashMap::new();

    let cost = 21;

    if dist.get(&42).map_or(true, |&val| val < cost) {
        dist.insert(42, 42);
    }
}

Note that now there's no more implicit panic from the unwrap call.

See also:

  • I corrected the (im)mutable, that was a typo. The pointers given are exactly what I needed. – Thrastylon Feb 7 '17 at 1:57

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