3

I've noticed, that I stumble upon a strange behavior of the if function when combining != and && operators. For instance, I have two std::string objects for which I want to check if they are not "ffff" or "0000" and then continue with some calculations.

Code looks like this:

std::string sentData("ffff")
std::string sentAddr("060C")
if (sentData == "ffff") 
    cout << "A 1. Same" << endl;
else 
    cout << "A 1. Different" << endl;
if (sentAddr == "0000") 
    cout << "A 2. Same" << endl;
else 
    cout << "A 2. Different" << endl;
if ((sentData == "ffff") && (sentAddr == "0000")) 
    cout << "A &&. Same" << endl;
else 
    cout << "A &&. Different" << endl;

if (sentData != "ffff") 
    cout << "B 1. Different" << endl;
else 
    cout << "B 1. Same" << endl;
if (sentAddr != "0000") 
    cout << "B 2. Different" << endl;
else 
    cout << "B 2. Same" << endl;
if ((sentData != "ffff") && (sentAddr != "0000")) 
    cout << "B &&. Different" << endl;
else 
    cout << "B &&. Same" << endl;

In theory, I think that it should produce the same result ... but it doesn't. The last if function treats && as || (and I do not know why), therefore I go into the last if statement even if only one of the answers is correct. Some answers below.

Works as it should:

sentData: ffff  sentAddr: 0000
A 1. Same
A 2. Same
A &&. Same
B 1. Same
B 2. Same
B &&. Same

sentData: ffdf  sentAddr: 060e
A 1. Different
A 2. Different
A &&. Different
B 1. Different
B 2. Different
B &&. Different

Works wrong:

sentData: ffff  sentAddr: 060c
A 1. Same
A 2. Different
A &&. Different
B 1. Same
B 2. Different
B &&. Same

sentData: fb8c  sentAddr: 0000
A 1. Different
A 2. Same
A &&. Different
B 1. Different
B 2. Same
B &&. Same

So if I use sentData: fb8c sentAddr: 0000 in if ((sentData != "ffff") && (sentAddr != "0000")) I get if (TRUE && FALSE), but apparently it still enters the if statement.

Q: Does anyone know why?

I am asking this because I would like to avoid writing ugly code like this:

if (!((sentData == "ffff") && (sentAddr == "0000"))) {
    // do stuff
}

or

if ((sentData == "ffff") && (sentAddr == "0000")) {
    // nothing to do
} else {
    // do stuff
}
  • 5
    So, basically you want to know why x!=a&&x!=b behaves as !(x==a||x==b) ? ... Draw truth tables and think a bit about it, because it's correct. Or is something else the problem? – deviantfan Feb 7 '17 at 11:00
  • 7
    Check De Morgan's law (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/De_Morgan%27s_laws ). !(a && b) == (!a || !b) – king_nak Feb 7 '17 at 11:01
  • "In theory, I think that it should produce the same result" Can you explain why you think this? – Lightness Races BY-SA 3.0 Feb 7 '17 at 12:42
  • @king_nak: Please do not answer in the comments section. – Lightness Races BY-SA 3.0 Feb 7 '17 at 12:43
  • No no no, you did not understand me. I am saying that in the last if statment "B &&. Different" is printed if either one of the conditions with != sign is true. But it should be printed only if both of them are true. Like so: IF ((sentData NOT EQUAL "ffff") AND (sentAddr NOT EQUAL "0000)) { do stuff ... } So is this De Morgan's Law or something else? @deviantfan, no this is not what I want to know. @Lightness Races in Orbit, hopefully I explained it a bit more now (I also updated the original question) – TheoryX Feb 7 '17 at 13:56
1

Since you seem to be still a bit confused, I'll try with a different approach than the one taken by @VermillionAzure with his brilliant answer.


Consider the following source code which has the exact same test conditions as yours, minus irrelevant ones, but a different output description:

if ((sentData == "ffff") && (sentAddr == "0000")) 
    cout << "both are equal" << endl;
else 
    cout << "at least one is different" << endl;

if ((sentData != "ffff") && (sentAddr != "0000")) 
    cout << "both are different" << endl;
else 
    cout << "at least one is equal" << endl;

This is the output:

sentData: ffff  sentAddr: 0000
both are equal
at least one is equal

sentData: ffdf  sentAddr: 060e
at least one is different
both are different

sentData: ffff  sentAddr: 060c
at least one is different
at least one is equal

sentData: fb8c  sentAddr: 0000
at least one is different
at least one is equal

As you see, the output doesn't appear to be inconsistent anymore.

Since I didn't change any of your test conditions but only the printed output, it necessarily follows that the description is now accurate wrt. the actual meaning of your test conditions.


If you want to rewrite this

if ((sentData == "ffff") && (sentAddr == "0000")) 
    cout << "both are equal" << endl;
else 
    cout << "at least one is different" << endl;

using !=, then you should do it as follows:

if (!((sentData != "ffff") || (sentAddr != "0000"))) 
    cout << "both are equal" << endl;
else 
    cout << "at least one is different" << endl;

This is an example of applying De Morgan's law.


Both of these two

if (!((sentData == "ffff") && (sentAddr == "0000"))){
    // do stuff
}

// note: please use brackets consistently
if ((sentData == "ffff") && (sentAddr == "0000")) {
} else {
    // do stuff
}

can be rewritten as

if ((sentData != "ffff") || (sentAddr != "0000")){
    // do stuff
}

ADDENDUM:

Your last edit to your question includes this statement:

So if I use sentData: fb8c sentAddr: 0000 in if ((sentData != "ffff") && (sentAddr != "0000")) I get if (TRUE && FALSE), but it still enters the if statement.

If by "it still enters the if statement" you mean that it takes the first branch, then you are wrong. In fact your output shows that it prints "B &&. Same", which is the second branch (else).

  • I see it now ... don't know how I could have been so blind for that long. Thank you! I would up vote both answers, but sadly I cannot due to the reputation limit. Thank you again! – TheoryX Feb 7 '17 at 15:47
9

You are incorrect in thinking that !a && !b is the opposite of !(a && b).

This is because distributing or un-distributing a negation over a Boolean operation requires that you flip the Boolean operation to its dual as well as negate the individual inner terms, and vice versa.

This is known as De Morgan's Law, and is a fundamental law in Boolean algebra.

Therefore the dual of:

(a && b)

is actually:

(!a || !b)

And the dual of:

(!a && !b)

is actually:

(a || b)

Here is the working code:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

int main()
{
    using namespace std;

    std::string sentData("ffff");
    std::string sentAddr("060C");

    auto a = (sentData == "ffff");  // true
    auto b = (sentAddr == "0000");  // false

    if (a)              cout << "A 1. Same" << endl;
    else                cout << "A 1. Different" << endl;

    if (b)              cout << "A 2. Same" << endl;
    else                cout << "A 2. Different" << endl;

    if (a && b)         cout << "A &&. Same" << endl;
    else                cout << "A &&. Different" << endl;

    if (!a)             cout << "B 1. Different" << endl;
    else                cout << "B 1. Same" << endl;

    if (!b)             cout << "B 2. Different" << endl;
    else                cout << "B 2. Same" << endl;

    if ((!a || !b))     cout << "B &&. Different" << endl;
    else                cout << "B &&. Same" << endl;
}

See it live on Coliru.

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