-1

Let's say I have :

one = np.array([ [2,3,np.array([ [1,2],  [7,3]   ])],
                 [4,5,np.array([ [11,12],[14,15] ])]
               ], dtype=object)


two = np.array([ [1,2] ,[7, 3],
                 [11,12] , [14,15] ])

I want to be able to compare the values that are in the array of the one array, with the values of two array.

I am talking about the

[1,2] ,[7, 3],
[11,12] , [14,15]

So, I want to check if they are the same, one by one.

Probably like:

for idx,x in np.ndenumerate(one):
    for idy,y in np.ndenumerate(two):
        print(y)

which gives all the elements of two.

I can't figure how to access at the same time all elements (but only the last from each row) of one and compare them with two

The problem is that they don't have the same dimensions.

5
  • if a and b are arrays, you can compare them element-wise with a == b
    – BlackBear
    Feb 7 '17 at 11:37
  • 2
    hi @george, if I were you, I would go to the python chat before asking here. You know the rules ...
    – Andy K
    Feb 7 '17 at 11:38
  • @BlackBear:The problem is that the dimensions differ
    – George
    Feb 7 '17 at 11:41
  • The fact that these are arrays is almost useless. two is (4,2) shape, so [1,2] is two[0,:]. But in one, it is one[0,3][0,:]. In an interactive python shell experiment with accessing terms till you figure out a pattern.
    – hpaulj
    Feb 7 '17 at 12:17
  • @hpaulj:It's one[0,2][0,:] :). The thing is that it confuses me how to access at the same time one and two.(and let's say that we don't have arrays,we have lists,ok)
    – George
    Feb 7 '17 at 13:20
2

This works

np.r_[tuple(one[:, 2])] == two

Output:

array([[ True,  True],
       [ True,  True],
       [ True,  True],
       [ True,  True]], dtype=bool)
10
  • Hmm..Nice.Can it show me in which indices of one and two this occurs?Thanks
    – George
    Feb 7 '17 at 13:58
  • You mean if not all entries are the same? For two it's easy, just apply np.where to the output array. For one I don't even know what exactly you want. You'd have to give an example. Feb 7 '17 at 14:02
  • For two you mean res = np.r_[tuple(one[:, 2])] == two ,result = np.where(res == True)?For one I want exactly the same.Just that when we are dealing with one we only check the last part (the one[:,2] ,the second index in a row )
    – George
    Feb 7 '17 at 14:09
  • Please update your post with an example, like given [[False, True], [False, False], [False, False], [True, True]] what exactly do you want as an output for indices; for two: [0, 3, 3], [1, 0, 1] for one ?? Feb 7 '17 at 14:27
  • Basically,from the (link)[stackoverflow.com/questions/42067429/… I asked you, I want to do the same thing (np.r_[] == ) but now I have class instances inside the array.Is there a way to use the np_r in this situation?
    – George
    Feb 7 '17 at 14:56
1

In a comment link @George tried to work with:

In [246]: a
Out[246]: array([1, [2, [33, 44, 55, 66]], 11, [22, [77, 88, 99, 100]]], dtype=object)
In [247]: a.shape
Out[247]: (4,)

This is a 4 element array. If we reshape it, we can isolate an inner layer

In [257]: a.reshape(2,2)
Out[257]: 
array([[1, [2, [33, 44, 55, 66]]],
       [11, [22, [77, 88, 99, 100]]]], dtype=object)
In [258]: a.reshape(2,2)[:,1]
Out[258]: array([[2, [33, 44, 55, 66]], [22, [77, 88, 99, 100]]], dtype=object)

This last case is (2,) - 2 lists. We can isolate the 2nd item in each list with a comprehension, and create an array from the resulting lists:

In [260]: a1=a.reshape(2,2)[:,1]
In [261]: [i[1] for i in a1]
Out[261]: [[33, 44, 55, 66], [77, 88, 99, 100]]
In [263]: np.array([i[1] for i in a1])
Out[263]: 
array([[ 33,  44,  55,  66],
       [ 77,  88,  99, 100]])

Nothing fancy here - just paying attention to array shapes, and using list operations where arrays don't work.

1
  • Hmm..you are right!Nice use of reshape here.Thanks for the tip (upvoted)
    – George
    Feb 11 '17 at 18:10

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