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As part of my education, I am reading the code to the following website, and trying to figure out how it all fits together.

https://www.wwf.org.uk/

My question; within the site header, there is a 'follow us' social media section. If you inspect this element as a whole, it sits inside a <div> tag with the class "social contextual-region".

What makes this <div> element sit in the centre of the page horizontally?

The element is displayed as inline-block, and has no padding, border or margin. Therefore, I consider that is should simply sit flush next to the 'become a WWF member' section, there should be no visable space between the two.

What part of the HTML/CSS is creating the spacing between the two elements and causing the social media section to be centralised horizontally?

  • Typically social media tags are managed by javascript or jquery. So, more than likely, there is a script running to fill the content of that div at run-time. Does that make sense? It may not have anything to do with your site-code. – Jon Glazer Feb 7 '17 at 13:22
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The alignment is made with a technique that implies the combination of text-align:justify, display: inline-block and generated content to have elements equally distribuited horizontally.

The purpose of generated content is to force a line break, otherwise the elements remain left (or right or center) aligned.

So, the important parts of the code are:

.header_top_bar .content {
    text-align: justify;
    ...
}

.header_top_bar .title, .header_top_bar .social, .header_top_bar .newsletter, .header_top_bar .search {
    display: inline-block;
    ...
}

and

.header_top_bar .content::after {
    content: '';
    display: inline-block;
    vertical-align: top;
    width: 99%;
}

At this link you can find an explanation of this technique.

I also made a fiddle with a simplified version of the code

.wrapper{
    text-align: justify;
    padding: 10px;
    background: #333;
}
.wrapper::after {
    content: '';
    display: inline-block;
    vertical-align: top;
    width: 99%;
}
.justified-element {
    display: inline-block;
    vertical-align: middle;
    margin: 0;
    font-size: 16px;
    color: #fff;
}
<div class="wrapper">
  <p class="justified-element">One</p>
  <span class="justified-element">Two</span>
  <div class="justified-element">Three</div>
  <p class="justified-element">Four</p>
</div>

  • thank you. This is great answer. Specifically, the 'generated content' is important as the elements only form one line. Here is a neat explanation: blog.vjeux.com/2011/css/css-one-line-justify.html – Andrew Hardiman Feb 7 '17 at 14:44
  • 1
    Yes, the generated content is the most important part, and the most interesting thing is that you can use this technique not only for text but also for layouts (as in the link I posted). – Elisa Feb 7 '17 at 14:54
  • I just wanted to add the following, as it is important to understand. The ::after selector adds additional content, after, the 'content' of the element (i.e. still within the element), not after the element itself. – Andrew Hardiman Feb 7 '17 at 16:24
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This line makes the "follow us" element sit in the centre:

text-align: justify;

It's in the div named content inside the div named header_top_bar, as you can see in the image below:

enter image description here

If you remove it then the elements look like this:

enter image description here

1

The parent of the div you're asking about has the css property text-align: justify

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