3

Original Issue

For integration tests hitting a database, I've been setting up a TransactionScope in the NUnit SetUp method and rolling back in the TearDown. When I switched my tests to use async for everything, changes weren't getting rolled back. I switched my SetUp from async Task to void and it started behaving as expected.

Short question derived from case

When using TransactionScope with async/await, do you need to create your SqlConnection on the same thread as the TransactionScope in order to propagate to all subsequent async operations?

Long Question

.NET added TransactionScopeAsyncFlowOption to TransactionScope and described it as controlling "whether the ambient transaction associated with the transaction scope will flow across thread continuations"

Based on behavior I'm seeing, it looks like you still need to instantiate your SqlConnections on the TransactionScope's root thread, otherwise commands aren't enlisted automatically in the ambient transaction. That makes mechanical sense, I just can't find it anywhere in the documentation. So I guess I'm wondering if anyone knows a little bit more about the subject?

This is the test case (uses NUnit and Dapper) I arrived at when trying to figure out what was going on with my specific issue, which was a timeout bc the table is locked by a transaction my second connection isn't enlisted in (i think?)

NUnit related side note: if you are testing async code and you wanna run everything inside a TransactionScope, don't make your [SetUp] method async Task. If you do, it'll probably run on a separate thread from your actual test method and your connections won't be enlisted in the transaction.

public class SqlConnectionTimeout
{
    public string DatabaseName = "AsyncDeadlock_TestCase";
    public string ConnectionString = "";

    [Test, Explicit]
    public void _RecreateDatabase()
    {
        using (var connection = IntegrationTestDatabase.RecreateDatabase(DatabaseName))
        {
            connection.Execute(@"
                CREATE TABLE [dbo].[example](
                    [id] [int] IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL,
                    [number] [int] NOT NULL,
                    CONSTRAINT [PK_example] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED 
                    (
                        [id] ASC
                    )WITH (PAD_INDEX = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS = ON) ON [PRIMARY]
                ) ON [PRIMARY];

                CREATE TABLE [dbo].[exampleTwo](
                    [id] [int] IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL,
                    [number] [int] NOT NULL,
                    CONSTRAINT [PK_exampleTwo] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED 
                    (
                        [id] ASC
                    )WITH (PAD_INDEX = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS = ON) ON [PRIMARY]
                ) ON [PRIMARY];
            ");
        }
    }

    [Test]
    public async Task Timeout()
    {
        TransactionScope transaction = null;
        SqlConnection firstConnection = null;

        Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
        {
            transaction = new TransactionScope(TransactionScopeAsyncFlowOption.Enabled);

            firstConnection = new SqlConnection(ConnectionString);
            firstConnection.Open();
        }).Wait();

        using (transaction)
        {
            using (firstConnection)
            {
                using (var secondConnection = new SqlConnection(ConnectionString))
                {
                    await secondConnection.OpenAsync();

                    await firstConnection.ExecuteAsync("INSERT INTO example (number) VALUES (100);");

                    Assert.ThrowsAsync<SqlException>(async () => await secondConnection.QueryAsync<int>(
                        new CommandDefinition("SELECT * FROM example", commandTimeout: 1)
                    ));
                }
            }
        }
    }

    [Test]
    public async Task NoTimeout()
    {
        TransactionScope transaction = null;
        SqlConnection firstConnection = null;
        SqlConnection secondConnection = null;

        Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
        {
            transaction = new TransactionScope(TransactionScopeAsyncFlowOption.Enabled);

            firstConnection = new SqlConnection(ConnectionString);
            firstConnection.Open();

            secondConnection = new SqlConnection(ConnectionString);
            secondConnection.Open();
        }).Wait();

        using (transaction)
        {
            using (firstConnection)
            {
                using (secondConnection )
                {
                    await firstConnection.ExecuteAsync("INSERT INTO example (number) VALUES (100);");

                    await secondConnection.QueryAsync<int>(
                        new CommandDefinition("SELECT * FROM example", commandTimeout: 1)
                    );
                }
            }
        }

        // verify that my connections correctly enlisted in the transaction
        // and rolled back my insert

        using (var thirdConnection = new SqlConnection(ConnectionString))
        {
            thirdConnection.Open();

            var count = await thirdConnection.ExecuteScalarAsync("SELECT COUNT(*) FROM example");
            Assert.AreEqual(0, count);
        }
    }
}
  • can you explicitly associate commands with the appropriate transaction? – Mobigital Feb 7 '17 at 22:07
  • 1
    Please make note of the .NET runtime you're using. – Stephen Cleary Feb 7 '17 at 22:09
  • 1
    The TransactionScope doesn't affect asynchronous operations. The option is needed because TransactionScope wasn't preserved by await to the synchronization context in previous versions. The test code though opens the connection on a different thread with Task.StartNew. There is no context to preserve. Why are you doing this instead of using SqlConnection.OpenAsync() ? – Panagiotis Kanavos Feb 8 '17 at 15:06
  • In other words - your code discards the TransactionScope explicitly. There is no ambient TransactionScope to enlist to. – Panagiotis Kanavos Feb 8 '17 at 15:07
  • 1
    "whether the ambient transaction associated with the transaction scope will flow across thread continuations" - yes, but your code isn't using a thread continuation to link the block which creates the TransactionScope and the later using blocks - so one would not expect this option to have any effect here. In other words, you create an ambient transaction within that StartNew lambda but there's never an ambient transaction in the surrounding code. – Damien_The_Unbeliever Feb 8 '17 at 15:26
0

Based on comments on my answer, specifically Panagiotis Kanavos' answer:

The async option for transactionscope causes the TransactionScope to be passed from task to task via the synchronization context. The test code in my question opened the connection on a different thread than the TransactionScope was opened on with Task.StartNew, so there was no context to pass along, no transaction to propagate.

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