I'm using elastic search for storing the data (spring data elasticsearch ) and I, need to store geolocation in my document. The class structure is in the following format.

@Document(indexName = "outlet")
public class OutletIndex implements IESMapper {

    @Id
    private String path;

    private String name;

    @GeoPointField
    private GeoPoint geoPoint;

    // setters and getters

}

Since there are no setters for class GeoPoint it does not work with @ModelAttribute annotation in spring MVC controller. That I need to get it from the front so I'd updated it to:

@Document(indexName = "outlet")
public class OutletIndex implements IESMapper {

    @Id
    private String path;

    private String name;

    @GeoPointField
    private GeoPoint geoPoint;

    private String geoLocation;


   public void setGeoLocation(String geoLocation) {
       this.geoLocation = geoLocation;
       if (geoLocation != null && geoLocation.trim() != "") {
           String[] loc = geoLocation.split(",");
           this.geoPoint = new GeoPoint(Double.parseDouble(loc[0]), Double.parseDouble(loc[1]));
       }
   } 

   // setters and getters

}

An additional field which holds it's string representation and within the Setter which also updates the GeoPiont.

Is there any better approach to do this?

EDIT: One more doubt, is there any way to use the string as geopoint(comma separated value)?

It seems like you are using geo_point data type with data in Elasticsearch of the format location:"latVal,lonVal". This is allowed with Elasticsearch as one of the valid formats for geo_point.

Elasticsearch just provides the data stored in the format you've given. For the same geo_point type in your ES schema, you can store it in multiple formats in different documents and when you try to get them ES will just return them in the format you've stored.

This thing causes issues, as if you have different formats for the same type to be handled specially for a type safe language like Java. You can either do 2 things: ensure a consistent type throughout (both while indexing and retrieving), handle each corner case on application side.

To avoid all this mess, a good rule of thumb I follow is to use the same format as the one provided by the Java client. Here in this case I would not use any custom de-serialization and serialization logic. Instead it would be better to save the location in the format location:{"lat": latVal, "lon": lonVal}. (GeoPoint class expects a double lat and a double lon)

If you ensure this, you will no longer need to think multiple times over the types you'll be receiving and their corner cases while handling them and at the same time avoid a lot of confusion.

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